Zhuang, Honglei


Spherical Text Embedding

Neural Information Processing Systems

Unsupervised text embedding has shown great power in a wide range of NLP tasks. While text embeddings are typically learned in the Euclidean space, directional similarity is often more effective in tasks such as word similarity and document clustering, which creates a gap between the training stage and usage stage of text embedding. To close this gap, we propose a spherical generative model based on which unsupervised word and paragraph embeddings are jointly learned. To learn text embeddings in the spherical space, we develop an efficient optimization algorithm with convergence guarantee based on Riemannian optimization. Our model enjoys high efficiency and achieves state-of-the-art performances on various text embedding tasks including word similarity and document clustering.


Spherical Text Embedding

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Unsupervised text embedding has shown great power in a wide range of NLP tasks. While text embeddings are typically learned in the Euclidean space, directional similarity is often more effective in tasks such as word similarity and document clustering, which creates a gap between the training stage and usage stage of text embedding. To close this gap, we propose a spherical generative model based on which unsupervised word and paragraph embeddings are jointly learned. To learn text embeddings in the spherical space, we develop an efficient optimization algorithm with convergence guarantee based on Riemannian optimization. Our model enjoys high efficiency and achieves state-of-the-art performances on various text embedding tasks including word similarity and document clustering.


Identifying Outlier Arms in Multi-Armed Bandit

Neural Information Processing Systems

We study a novel problem lying at the intersection of two areas: multi-armed bandit and outlier detection. Multi-armed bandit is a useful tool to model the process of incrementally collecting data for multiple objects in a decision space. Outlier detection is a powerful method to narrow down the attention to a few objects after the data for them are collected. However, no one has studied how to detect outlier objects while incrementally collecting data for them, which is necessary when data collection is expensive. We formalize this problem as identifying outlier arms in a multi-armed bandit. We propose two sampling strategies with theoretical guarantee, and analyze their sampling efficiency. Our experimental results on both synthetic and real data show that our solution saves 70-99% of data collection cost from baseline while having nearly perfect accuracy.


Role-Aware Conformity Modeling and Analysis in Social Networks

AAAI Conferences

Conformity is the inclination of a person to be influenced by others. In this paper, we study how the conformity tendency of a person changes with her role, as defined by her structural properties in a social network. We first formalize conformity using a utility function based on the conformity theory from social psychology, and validate the proposed utility function by proving the existence of Nash Equilibria when all users in a network behave according to it. We then extend and incorporate the utility function into a probabilistic topic model, called the Role-Conformity Model (RCM), for modeling user behaviors under the effect of conformity. We apply the proposed RCM to several academic research networks, and discover that people with higher degree and lower clustering coefficient are more likely to conform to others. We also evaluate RCM through the task of word usage prediction in academic publications, and show significant improvements over baseline models.


Zhang

AAAI Conferences

Conformity is the inclination of a person to be influenced by others. In this paper, we study how the conformity tendency of a person changes with her role, as defined by her structural properties in a social network. We first formalize conformity using a utility function based on the conformity theory from social psychology, and validate the proposed utility function by proving the existence of Nash Equilibria when all users in a network behave according to it. We then extend and incorporate the utility function into a probabilistic topic model, called the Role-Conformity Model (RCM), for modeling user behaviors under the effect of conformity. We apply the proposed RCM to several academic research networks, and discover that people with higher degree and lower clustering coefficient are more likely to conform to others. We also evaluate RCM through the task of word usage prediction in academic publications, and show significant improvements over baseline models.