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Yanco, Holly


The Pyro Toolkit for AI and Robotics

AI Magazine

This article introduces Pyro, an open-source Python robotics toolkit for exploring topics in AI and robotics.


The Pyro Toolkit for AI and Robotics

AI Magazine

This article introduces Pyro, an open-source Python robotics toolkit for exploring topics in AI and robotics. We present key abstractions that allow Pyro controllers to run unchanged on a variety of real and simulated robots. We demonstrate Pyro's use in a set of curricular modules. We then describe how Pyro can provide a smooth transition for the student from symbolic agents to real-world robots, which significantly reduces the cost of learning to use robots. Finally we show how Pyro has been successfully integrated into existing AI and robotics courses.


The 2004 Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

The thirteenth AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition was once again collocated with AAAI-2204, in San Jose, California. As in previous years, the robot events drew competitors from both academia and industry to showcase state-ofthe- art mobile robot software and systems in four organized events.


The 2004 Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

Running services in many small processes improves fault tolerance since any number of services can fail due to programming faults without affecting the rest of the system. While it is clearly important to be able to handle a wide range of failures, application authors should not be required to implement routines to test and react in every known mode of failure for every application, even if the failures are abstracted to a common interface. Thus, the framework also provides transparent fault-tolerance to users of system services. Errors in software and hardware are detected, and corrective action is taken. Services can be restarted or removed from the system, and clients are reconnected to the same service or to another service implementing the same interface without intervention from the application programmer. The Washington University team successfully demonstrated its failure-tolerant framework on its robot, Lewis (figure 6).


2003 AAAI Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

The Twelfth Annual Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) Robot Competition and Exhibition was held in Acapulco, Mexico, in conjunction with the Eighteenth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence. The events included the Robot Host and Urban Search and Rescue competitions, the AAAI Robot Challenge, and the Robot Exhibition. In the Urban Search and Rescue competition, teams attempted to find victims in a simulated disaster area using teleoperated, semiautonomous, and autonomous robots. The AAAI Robot Challenge is a noncompetitive event where the robots attempt to attend the conference by locating the registration booth, registering for the conference, and then giving a talk to an audience.


2003 AAAI Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

The Twelfth Annual Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) Robot Competition and Exhibition was held in Acapulco, Mexico, in conjunction with the Eighteenth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence. The events included the Robot Host and Urban Search and Rescue competitions, the AAAI Robot Challenge, and the Robot Exhibition. In the Robot Host event, the robots had to act as mobile information servers and guides to the exhibit area of the conference. In the Urban Search and Rescue competition, teams attempted to find victims in a simulated disaster area using teleoperated, semiautonomous, and autonomous robots. The AAAI Robot Challenge is a noncompetitive event where the robots attempt to attend the conference by locating the registration booth, registering for the conference, and then giving a talk to an audience. Finally, the Robot Exhibition is an opportunity for robotics researchers to demonstrate their robots' capabilities to conference attendees. The three days of events were capped by the two Robot Challenge participants giving talks and answering questions from the audience.


Ten Years of the AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

Summer 2001 marked the tenth AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition. A decade of contests and exhibitions have inspired innovation and research in AI robotics. We also reflect on how the contest has served as an arena for important debates in the AI and robotics communities. The article closes with a speculative look forward to the next decade of AAAI robot competitions.


AAAI/RoboCup-2001 Robot Rescue

AI Magazine

The AAAI/RoboCup Robot Rescue event is designed to push researchers to design robotic systems for urban search and rescue. The rules were written to approximate a real rescue situation in a simulated environment constructed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.


Ten Years of the AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

"Neats and scruffies alike were mesmerized by the animal-like responses of the robots demonstrated there," says Bonasso. "At the end of "This won't be a slick, polished competition. Over the AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition years, the event and AI Magazine have served as was born. The event has endured to a venue for this and several other intellectual become the oldest AIcentric robotics competition debates, including sensing versus modeling, in the world. As we near the end of our color-based versus shape-based object recognition, first decade, it seems worthwhile to reflect on and reactive control versus symbolic what the origins of the event were, how it has planning for robot navigation (Balch et al. evolved, and where it is headed. The contest immediately took on two important but apparently conflicting roles: First, it provided a target for research in AI and robotics; in Pete Bonasso's words, the event was cast "in the spirit of trying to develop as animate, responsive, and intelligent robot behavior as possible" (Dean and Bonasso 1993).


AAAI/RoboCup-2001 Robot Rescue

AI Magazine

The search and rescue efforts involving structural joint rules committee from RoboCup and collapse and other urban environments (Fire AAAI brought two communities together to 1993). The main task of USAR is to recover live develop the rules and scoring method. Robots involved with USAR must were four registered teams in the competition: identify victims and send back the locations to (1) Sharif University, (2) Swarthmore College, trained medical rescue personnel for removal (3) Utah State University, and (4) the University of the victims from the collapsed area. Additionally, several teams Robot Rescue League rules, designed by the exhibited their robots in the rescue arena, rules committee, keep the USAR task in focus including the University of South Florida and by addressing several issues that arise in real the University of Minnesota. This article discusses USAR situations, such as the time to transport the 2001 Robot Rescue event: the and set up the robot; the number of personnel course, the rules, the research approaches of required to run the robot; and, most importantly, the participants, and the final scores.