Thomaz, Andrea L.


The AAAI 2011 Robot Exhibition

AI Magazine

In this article we report on the exhibits and challenges shown at the AAAI 2011 Robotics Program in San Francisco. The event included a broad demonstration of innovative research at the intersection of robotics and artificial intelligence. Through these multi-year challenge events, our goal has been to focus the research community's energy toward common platforms and common problems to work toward the greater goal of embodied AI.


The AAAI 2011 Robot Exhibition

AI Magazine

In this article we report on the exhibits and challenges shown at the AAAI 2011 Robotics Program in San Francisco. The event included a broad demonstration of innovative research at the intersection of robotics and artificial intelligence. Through these multi-year challenge events, our goal has been to focus the research community’s energy toward common platforms and common problems to work toward the greater goal of embodied AI.


Turn-Taking Based on Information Flow for Fluent Human-Robot Interaction

AI Magazine

Turn-taking is a fundamental part of human communication. Our goal is to devise a turn-taking framework for human-robot interaction that, like the human skill, represents something fundamental about interaction, generic to context or domain. We propose a model of turn-taking, and conduct an experiment with human subjects to inform this model. Our findings from this study suggest that information flow is an integral part of human floor-passing behavior.


Turn-Taking Based on Information Flow for Fluent Human-Robot Interaction

AI Magazine

Turn-taking is a fundamental part of human communication. Our goal is to devise a turn-taking framework for human-robot interaction that, like the human skill, represents something fundamental about interaction, generic to context or domain. We propose a model of turn-taking, and conduct an experiment with human subjects to inform this model. Our findings from this study suggest that information flow is an integral part of human floor-passing behavior. Following this, we implement autonomous floor relinquishing on a robot and discuss our insights into the nature of a general turn-taking model for human-robot interaction.


Report on the AAAI 2010 Robot Exhibition

AI Magazine

The 19th robotics program at the annual AAAI conference was held in Atlanta, Georgia in July 2010. In this article we give a summary of three components of the exhibition: small scale manipulation challenge: robotic chess; the learning by demonstration challenge, and the education track. We also describe the participating teams, highlight the research questions they tackled and briefly describe the systems they demonstrated.


Report on the AAAI 2010 Robot Exhibition

AI Magazine

The 19th robotics program at the annual AAAI conference was held in Atlanta, Georgia in July 2010. In this article we give a summary of three components of the exhibition: small scale manipulation challenge: robotic chess; the learning by demonstration challenge, and the education track. In each section we detail the challenge task. We also describe the participating teams, highlight the research questions they tackled and briefly describe the systems they demonstrated.


Enabling Intelligence through Middleware: Report of the AAAI 2010 Workshop

AI Magazine

The AAAI 2010 Workshop on Enabling Intelligence through Middleware (held during the Twenty-Fourth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence) focused on the issues and opportunities inherent in the robotics middleware packages that we use. The workshop consisted of three invited speakers and six middleware research presenters. This report presents the highlights of that discussion and the packages presented.


Reports of the AAAI 2009 Spring Symposia

AI Magazine

The titles of the nine symposia were Agents that Learn from Human Teachers, Benchmarking of Qualitative Spatial and Temporal Reasoning Systems, Experimental Design for Real-World Systems, Human Behavior Modeling, Intelligent Event Processing, Intelligent Narrative Technologies II, Learning by Reading and Learning to Read, Social Semantic Web: Where Web 2.0 Meets Web 3.0, and Technosocial Predictive Analytics. The aim of the Benchmarking of Qualitative Spatial and Temporal Reasoning Systems symposium was to initiate the development of a problem repository in the field of qualitative spatial and temporal reasoning and identify a graded set of challenges for future midterm and long-term research. The Intelligent Event Processing symposium discussed the need for more AI-based approaches in event processing and defined a kind of research agenda for the field, coined as intelligent complex event processing (iCEP). The Intelligent Narrative Technologies II AAAI symposium discussed innovations, progress, and novel techniques in the research domain.


Reports of the AAAI 2009 Spring Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, was pleased to present the 2009 Spring Symposium Series, held Monday through Wednesday, March 23–25, 2009 at Stanford University. The titles of the nine symposia were Agents that Learn from Human Teachers, Benchmarking of Qualitative Spatial and Temporal Reasoning Systems, Experimental Design for Real-World Systems, Human Behavior Modeling, Intelligent Event Processing, Intelligent Narrative Technologies II, Learning by Reading and Learning to Read, Social Semantic Web: Where Web 2.0 Meets Web 3.0, and Technosocial Predictive Analytics. The goal of the Agents that Learn from Human Teachers was to investigate how we can enable software and robotics agents to learn from real-time interaction with an everyday human partner. The aim of the Benchmarking of Qualitative Spatial and Temporal Reasoning Systems symposium was to initiate the development of a problem repository in the field of qualitative spatial and temporal reasoning and identify a graded set of challenges for future midterm and long-term research. The Experimental Design symposium discussed the challenges of evaluating AI systems. The Human Behavior Modeling symposium explored reasoning methods for understanding various aspects of human behavior, especially in the context of designing intelligent systems that interact with humans. The Intelligent Event Processing symposium discussed the need for more AI-based approaches in event processing and defined a kind of research agenda for the field, coined as intelligent complex event processing (iCEP). The Intelligent Narrative Technologies II AAAI symposium discussed innovations, progress, and novel techniques in the research domain. The Learning by Reading and Learning to Read symposium explored two aspects of making natural language texts semantically accessible to, and processable by, machines. The Social Semantic Web symposium focused on the real-world grand challenges in this area. Finally, the Technosocial Predictive Analytics symposium explored new methods for anticipatory analytical thinking that provide decision advantage through the integration of human and physical models.