Sukthankar, Gita


Learning Continuous State/Action Models for Humanoid Robots

AAAI Conferences

Reinforcement learning (RL) is a popular choice for solving robotic control problems. However, applying RL techniques to controlling humanoid robots with high degrees of freedom remains problematic due to the difficulty of acquiring sufficient training data. The problem is compounded by the fact that most real-world problems involve continuous states and actions. In order for RL to be scalable to these situations it is crucial that the algorithm be sample efficient. Model-based methods tend to be more data efficient than model-free approaches and have the added advantage that a single model can generalize to multiple control problems. This paper proposes a model approximation algorithm for continuous states and actions that integrates case-based reasoning (CBR) and Hidden Markov Models (HMM) to generalize from a small set of state instances. The paper demonstrates that the performance of the learned model is close to that of the system dynamics it approximates, where performance is measured in terms of sampling error.



The Ninth Annual AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment (AIIDE): A Report

AI Magazine

The Ninth Annual AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment (AIIDE) was held October 14–18, 2013, at Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts. The mission of the AIIDE conference is to provide a forum for researchers and game developers to discuss ways that AI can enhance games and other forms of interactive entertainment. In addition to presentations on adapting standard AI techniques such as search, planning and machine learning for use within games, key topic areas include creating realistic autonomous characters, interactive narrative, procedural content generation, and integrating AI into game design and production tools.


The Ninth Annual AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment (AIIDE): A Report

AI Magazine

The Ninth Annual AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment (AIIDE) was held October 14–18, 2013, at Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts. The mission of the AIIDE conference is to provide a forum for researchers and game developers to discuss ways that AI can enhance games and other forms of interactive entertainment. In addition to presentations on adapting standard AI techniques such as search, planning and machine learning for use within games, key topic areas include creating realistic autonomous characters, interactive narrative, procedural content generation, and integrating AI into game design and production tools.



The AAAI-13 Conference Workshops

AI Magazine

The AAAI-13 Workshop Program, a part of the 27th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, was held Sunday and Monday, July 14–15, 2013 at the Hyatt Regency Bellevue Hotel in Bellevue, Washington, USA. The program included 12 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence, including Activity Context-Aware System Architectures (WS-13-05); Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Methods in Computational Biology (WS-13-06); Combining Constraint Solving with Mining and Learning (WS-13-07); Computer Poker and Imperfect Information (WS-13-08); Expanding the Boundaries of Health Informatics Using Artificial Intelligence (WS-13-09); Intelligent Robotic Systems (WS-13-10); Intelligent Techniques for Web Personalization and Recommendation (WS-13-11); Learning Rich Representations from Low-Level Sensors (WS-13-12); Plan, Activity, and Intent Recognition (WS-13-13); Space, Time, and Ambient Intelligence (WS-13-14); Trading Agent Design and Analysis (WS-13-15); and Statistical Relational Artificial Intelligence (WS-13-16).


Reports of the AAAI 2011 Conference Workshops

AI Magazine

The AAAI-11 workshop program was held Sunday and Monday, August 7–18, 2011, at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco in San Francisco, California USA. The AAAI-11 workshop program included 15 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence. The titles of the workshops were Activity Context Representation: Techniques and Languages; Analyzing Microtext; Applied Adversarial Reasoning and Risk Modeling; Artificial Intelligence and Smarter Living: The Conquest of Complexity; AI for Data Center Management and Cloud Computing; Automated Action Planning for Autonomous Mobile Robots; Computational Models of Natural Argument; Generalized Planning; Human Computation; Human-Robot Interaction in Elder Care; Interactive Decision Theory and Game Theory; Language-Action Tools for Cognitive Artificial Agents: Integrating Vision, Action and Language; Lifelong Learning; Plan, Activity, and Intent Recognition; and Scalable Integration of Analytics and Visualization. This article presents short summaries of those events.


Reports of the AAAI 2011 Conference Workshops

AI Magazine

The AAAI-11 workshop program was held Sunday and Monday, August 7–18, 2011, at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco in San Francisco, California USA. The AAAI-11 workshop program included 15 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence. The titles of the workshops were Activity Context Representation: Techniques and Languages; Analyzing Microtext; Applied Adversarial Reasoning and Risk Modeling; Artificial Intelligence and Smarter Living: The Conquest of Complexity; AI for Data Center Management and Cloud Computing; Automated Action Planning for Autonomous Mobile Robots; Computational Models of Natural Argument; Generalized Planning; Human Computation; Human-Robot Interaction in Elder Care; Interactive Decision Theory and Game Theory; Language-Action Tools for Cognitive Artificial Agents: Integrating Vision, Action and Language; Lifelong Learning; Plan, Activity, and Intent Recognition; and Scalable Integration of Analytics and Visualization. This article presents short summaries of those events.


A Real-Time Opponent Modeling System for Rush Football

AAAI Conferences

One drawback with using plan recognition in adversarial games is that often players must commit to a plan before it is possible to infer the opponent's intentions. In such cases, it is valuable to couple plan recognition with plan repair, particularly in multi-agent domains where complete replanning is not computationally feasible. This paper presents a method for learning plan repair policies in real-time using Upper Confidence Bounds applied to Trees (UCT). We demonstrate how these policies can be coupled with plan recognition in an American football game (Rush 2008) to create an autonomous offensive team capable of responding to unexpected changes in defensive strategy. Our real-time version of UCT learns play modifications that result in a significantly higher average yardage and fewer interceptions than either the baseline game or domain-specific heuristics. Although it is possible to use the actual game simulator to measure reward offline, to execute UCT in real-time demands a different approach; here we describe two modules for reusing data from offline UCT searches to learn accurate state and reward estimators.


Reports of the AAAI 2010 Fall Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the 2010 Fall Symposium Series, held Thursday through Saturday, November 11-13, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia. The titles of the eight symposia are as follows: (1) Cognitive and Metacognitive Educational Systems; (2) Commonsense Knowledge; (3) Complex Adaptive Systems: Resilience, Robustness, and Evolvability; (4) Computational Models of Narrative; (5) Dialog with Robots; (6) Manifold Learning and Its Applications; (7) Proactive Assistant Agents; and (8) Quantum Informatics for Cognitive, Social, and Semantic Processes. The highlights of each symposium are presented in this report.