Scheutz, Matthias



A Framework for Resolving Open-World Referential Expressions in Distributed Heterogeneous Knowledge Bases

AAAI Conferences

We present a domain-independent approach to reference resolution that allows a robotic or virtual agent to resolve references to entities (e.g., objects and locations) found in open worlds when the information needed to resolve such references is distributed among multiple heterogeneous knowledge bases in its architecture. An agent using this approach can combine information from multiple sources without the computational bottleneck associated with centralized knowledge bases. The proposed approach also facilitates “lazy constraint evaluation”, i.e., verifying properties of the referent through different modalities only when the information is needed. After specifying the interfaces by which a reference resolution algorithm can request information from distributed knowledge bases, we present an algorithm for performing open-world reference resolution within that framework, analyze the algorithm’s performance, and demonstrate its behavior on a simulated robot.


Learning to Recognize Novel Objects in One Shot through Human-Robot Interactions in Natural Language Dialogues

AAAI Conferences

Being able to quickly and naturally teach robots new knowledge is critical for many future open-world human-robot interaction scenarios. In this paper we present a novel approach to using natural language context for one-shot learning of visual objects, where the robot is immediately able to recognize the described object. We describe the architectural components and demonstrate the proposed approach on a robotic platform in a proof-of-concept evaluation.


Grounding Natural Language References to Unvisited and Hypothetical Locations

AAAI Conferences

While much research exists on resolving spatial natural language references to known locations, little work deals with handling references to unknown locations. In this paper we introduce and evaluate algorithms integrated into a cognitive architecture which allow an agent to learn about its environ-ment while resolving references to both known and unknown locations. We also describe how multiple components in the architecture jointly facilitate these capabilities.


Crossing Boundaries: Multi-Level Introspection in a Complex Robotic Architecture for Automatic Performance Improvements

AAAI Conferences

Introspection mechanisms are employed in agent architectures toimprove agent performance. However, there is currently no approach tointrospection that makes automatic adjustments at multiple levels inthe implemented agent system. We introduce our novel multi-levelintrospection framework that can be used to automatically adjustarchitectural configurations based on the introspection results at theagent, infrastructure and component level. We demonstrate the utilityof such adjustments in a concrete implementation on a robot where thehigh-level goal of the robot is used to automatically configure thevision system in a way that minimizes resource consumption whileimproving overall task performance.


Mapping the Landscape of Human-Level Artificial General Intelligence

AI Magazine

We present the broad outlines of a roadmap toward human-level artificial general intelligence (henceforth, AGI). We begin by discussing AGI in general, adopting a pragmatic goal for its attainment and a necessary foundation of characteristics and requirements. An initial capability landscape will be presented, drawing on major themes from developmental psychology and illuminated by mathematical, physiological and information processing perspectives. The challenge of identifying appropriate tasks and environments for measuring AGI will be addressed, and seven scenarios will be presented as milestones suggesting a roadmap across the AGI landscape along with directions for future research and collaboration.


Toward Humanlike Task-Based Dialogue Processing for Human Robot Interaction

AI Magazine

Many human social exchanges and coordinated activities critically involve dialogue interactions. Hence, we need to develop natural humanlike dialogue processing mechanisms for future robots if they are to interact with humans in natural ways. In this article we discuss the challenges of designing such flexible dialogue-based robotic systems. We report results from data we collected in human interaction experiments in the context of a search task and show how we can use these results to build more flexible robotic architectures that are starting to address the challenges of task-based humanlike natural language dialogues on robots.


Toward Humanlike Task-Based Dialogue Processing for Human Robot Interaction

AI Magazine

Many human social exchanges and coordinated activities critically involve dialogue interactions. Hence, we need to develop natural humanlike dialogue processing mechanisms for future robots if they are to interact with humans in natural ways. In this article we discuss the challenges of designing such flexible dialogue-based robotic systems. We report results from data we collected in human interaction experiments in the context of a search task and show how we can use these results to build more flexible robotic architectures that are starting to address the challenges of task-based humanlike natural language dialogues on robots.


The Third International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction

AI Magazine

The third international conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI-2008) was held in Amsterdam, The Netherland, March 12-15, 2008. The theme of HRI-2008, "Living With Robots", highlights the importance of the technical and social issues underlying human-robot interaction with companion and assistive robots for long-term use in everyday life and work activities. More than two hundred and fifty researchers, practitioners, and exhibitors attended the conference, and many more contributed to the conference as authors or reviewers. HRI-2009 will be held in San Diego, California from March 11-13, 2009.


The Third International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction

AI Magazine

The third international conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI-2008) was held in Amsterdam, The Netherland, March 12-15, 2008. The theme of HRI-2008, "Living With Robots", highlights the importance of the technical and social issues underlying human-robot interaction with companion and assistive robots for long-term use in everyday life and work activities. More than two hundred and fifty researchers, practitioners, and exhibitors attended the conference, and many more contributed to the conference as authors or reviewers. HRI-2009 will be held in San Diego, California from March 11-13, 2009.