Riedl, Mark


A General Level Design Editor for Co-Creative Level Design

AAAI Conferences

In this paper we describe a level design editor designed as an interface to allow different AI agents to creatively collaborate on level design problems with human designers. We intend to investigate the comparative impacts of different AI techniques on user experience in this context.


Playable Experiences at AIIDE 2016

AAAI Conferences

The AIIDE Playable Experiences track celebrates innovations in how AI can be used in polished interactive experiences. Four 2016 accepted submissions display a diversity of approaches. Rogue Process combines techniques for medium-permanence procedurally generated hacking worlds. Elsinore applies temporal predicate logic to enable a time-traveling narrative with character simulation. A novel level generator uses conceptual blending to translate Mario Bros. design styles across levels. And Bad News uses deep simulation of a town and it's residents to ground a mixed-reality performance. Together these playable experiences showcase the opportunities for AI in interactive experiences.


Dramatis: A Computational Model of Suspense

AAAI Conferences

We introduce Dramatis, a computational model of suspense based on a reformulation of a psychological definition of the suspense phenomenon. In this reformulation, suspense is correlated with the audience’s ability to generate a plan for the protagonist to avoid an impending negative outcome. Dramatis measures the suspense level by generating such a plan and determining its perceived likelihood of success. We report on three evaluations of Dramatis, including a comparison of Dramatis output to the suspense reported by human readers, as well as ablative tests of Dramatis components. In these studies, we found that Dramatis output corresponded to the suspense ratings given by human readers for stories in three separate domains.


The Eighth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment

AI Magazine

The Eighth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment (AIIDE) was held October 8-12, 2012, at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. The conference included a research and industry track as well as a demonstration program. The conference featured 16 technical papers, 16 posters, and one demonstration, along with invited speakers, the StarCraft Ai competition, a newly-introduced Doctoral Consortium, and 5 workshops.


The Eighth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment

AI Magazine

The Eighth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment (AIIDE) was held October 8-12, 2012, at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. The conference included a research and industry track as well as a demonstration program. The conference featured 16 technical papers, 16 posters, and one demonstration, along with invited speakers, the StarCraft Ai competition, a newly-introduced Doctoral Consortium, and 5 workshops. This report summarizes the activities of the conference.


Recap of the Seventh AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment (AIIDE)

AI Magazine

The Seventh AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment was held from October 11–14, 2011, on the campus of Stanford University near Palo Alto, California. This report summarizes the conference and related activities.


Recap of the Seventh AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment (AIIDE)

AI Magazine

The Seventh AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment was held from October 11–14, 2011, on the campus of Stanford University near Palo Alto, California. The conference featured a research track, an industry track, a demo program, and three one-day workshops. This report summarizes the conference and related activities.


Automated Scenario Adaptation in Support of Intelligent Tutoring Systems

AAAI Conferences

Learners may develop expertise by experiencing numerous different but relevant situations. Computer games and virtual simulations can facilitate these training opportunities, however, because of the relative difficulty in authoring new scenarios, the increasing need for new and different scenarios becomes a bottleneck in the learning process. Furthermore, a one-size-fits-all scenario may not address all of the abilities, needs, or goals of a particular learner. To address these issues we present a novel technique, Automated Scenario Adaptation, to automatically “rewrite” narrative scenario content to suit individual learners’ needs and abilities and to incorporate recent changes from real world learning needs. Scenario adaptation acts as problem generation for intelligent tutoring systems, producing greater learning opportunities that facilitate engagement and continued learner involvement.


Supporting End-User Authoring of Alternate Reality Games with Cross-Location Compatibility

AAAI Conferences

Alternate reality games (ARG) overlay a fictional story on top of the real world. Geo-location ties ARG storylines to specific locations in the real world. Unfortunately these games suffer from cross-location scalability limitation: games can only be played in very specific places. We describe location translation, a process whereby ARG locations are transformed to new locations through a combination of statistical information retrieval and greedy hill-climbing search.


Reports of the AAAI 2010 Conference Workshops

AI Magazine

The AAAI-10 Workshop program was held Sunday and Monday, July 11–12, 2010 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgia. The AAAI-10 workshop program included 13 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence. The titles of the workshops were AI and Fun, Bridging the Gap between Task and Motion Planning, Collaboratively-Built Knowledge Sources and Artificial Intelligence, Goal-Directed Autonomy, Intelligent Security, Interactive Decision Theory and Game Theory, Metacognition for Robust Social Systems, Model Checking and Artificial Intelligence, Neural-Symbolic Learning and Reasoning, Plan, Activity, and Intent Recognition, Statistical Relational AI, Visual Representations and Reasoning, and Abstraction, Reformulation, and Approximation. This article presents short summaries of those events.