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Raglin, Adrienne


Causal Inference for Time series Analysis: Problems, Methods and Evaluation

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Time series data is a collection of chronological observations which is generated by several domains such as medical and financial fields. Over the years, different tasks such as classification, forecasting, and clustering have been proposed to analyze this type of data. Time series data has been also used to study the effect of interventions over time. Moreover, in many fields of science, learning the causal structure of dynamic systems and time series data is considered an interesting task which plays an important role in scientific discoveries. Estimating the effect of an intervention and identifying the causal relations from the data can be performed via causal inference. Existing surveys on time series discuss traditional tasks such as classification and forecasting or explain the details of the approaches proposed to solve a specific task. In this paper, we focus on two causal inference tasks, i.e., treatment effect estimation and causal discovery for time series data, and provide a comprehensive review of the approaches in each task. Furthermore, we curate a list of commonly used evaluation metrics and datasets for each task and provide in-depth insight. These metrics and datasets can serve as benchmarks for research in the field.


Causal Adversarial Network for Learning Conditional and Interventional Distributions

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We propose a generative Causal Adversarial Network (CAN) for learning and sampling from conditional and interventional distributions. In contrast to the existing CausalGAN which requires the causal graph to be given, our proposed framework learns the causal relations from the data and generates samples accordingly. The proposed CAN comprises a two-fold process namely Label Generation Network (LGN) and Conditional Image Generation Network (CIGN). The LGN is a GAN-based architecture which learns and samples from the causal model over labels. The sampled labels are then fed to CIGN, a conditional GAN architecture, which learns the relationships amongst labels and pixels and pixels themselves and generates samples based on them. This framework is equipped with an intervention mechanism which enables. the model to generate samples from interventional distributions. We quantitatively and qualitatively assess the performance of CAN and empirically show that our model is able to generate both interventional and conditional samples without having access to the causal graph for the application of face generation on CelebA data.


Causal Interpretability for Machine Learning -- Problems, Methods and Evaluation

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Machine learning models have had discernible achievements in a myriad of applications. However, most of these models are black-boxes, and it is obscure how the decisions are made by them. This makes the models unreliable and untrustworthy. To provide insights into the decision making processes of these models, a variety of traditional interpretable models have been proposed. Moreover, to generate more human-friendly explanations, recent work on interpretability tries to answer questions related to causality such as "Why does this model makes such decisions?" or "Was it a specific feature that caused the decision made by the model?". In this work, models that aim to answer causal questions are referred to as causal interpretable models. The existing surveys have covered concepts and methodologies of traditional interpretability. In this work, we present a comprehensive survey on causal interpretable models from the aspects of the problems and methods. In addition, this survey provides in-depth insights into the existing evaluation metrics for measuring interpretability, which can help practitioners understand for what scenarios each evaluation metric is suitable.


Deep causal representation learning for unsupervised domain adaptation

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Studies show that the representations learned by deep neural networks can be transferred to similar prediction tasks in other domains for which we do not have enough labeled data. However, as we transition to higher layers in the model, the representations become more task-specific and less generalizable. Recent research on deep domain adaptation proposed to mitigate this problem by forcing the deep model to learn more transferable feature representations across domains. This is achieved by incorporating domain adaptation methods into deep learning pipeline. The majority of existing models learn the transferable feature representations which are highly correlated with the outcome. However, correlations are not always transferable. In this paper, we propose a novel deep causal representation learning framework for unsupervised domain adaptation, in which we propose to learn domain-invariant causal representations of the input from the source domain. We simulate a virtual target domain using reweighted samples from the source domain and estimate the causal effect of features on the outcomes. The extensive comparative study demonstrates the strengths of the proposed model for unsupervised domain adaptation via causal representations.


Between Multi-Attribute Utility Decision Making and Recommender Systems: Transparent, Instantaneous, Local Recommendations for Sparse Data

AAAI Conferences

One of the most significant contributions to decision technology is multi-attribute utility (MAU) theory. MAU has gained increased traction in determining the value of information in tactical networking, has been a inspiration for some content-based recommender systems, and artifacts of MAU can be found on nearly every e-commerce website. While recommender systems attempt to create a model of the user (often on latent variables) from rating data, MAU attempts to solicit content-relevant attribute weightings explicitly. Both of these methods have trade-offs which might be mitigated if they could be combined. This research presents a method that we call MAUSVR for fusing recommender and MAU decision technology by automatically learning MAU models (from a user's ratings. A comparison with collaborative filtering techniques on the MovieLens dataset suggests that MAUSVR achieves better ranking quality under sparse conditions while also gaining in transparency and locality. Additionally, MAUSVR was able to be built instantaneously (< 100ms) for more than 75% of the evaluated users with an off-the shelf Java implementation of SMOreg. These findings indicate promise for the use of MAUSVR in real-time decision support systems operating in sparse data conditions.