Pollack, Martha E.


Intelligent Technology for an Aging Population: The Use of AI to Assist Elders with Cognitive Impairment

AI Magazine

Today, approximately 10 percent of the world's population is over the age of 60; by 2050 this proportion will have more than doubled. Moreover, the greatest rate of increase is amongst the "oldest old," people aged 85 and over. While many older adults remain healthy and productive, overall this segment of the population is subject to physical and cognitive impairment at higher rates than younger people. This article surveys new technologies that incorporate artificial intelligence techniques to support older adults and help them cope with the changes of aging, in particular with cognitive decline.


Intelligent Technology for an Aging Population: The Use of AI to Assist Elders with Cognitive Impairment

AI Magazine

Today, approximately 10 percent of the world's population is over the age of 60; by 2050 this proportion will have more than doubled. Moreover, the greatest rate of increase is amongst the "oldest old," people aged 85 and over. While many older adults remain healthy and productive, overall this segment of the population is subject to physical and cognitive impairment at higher rates than younger people. This article surveys new technologies that incorporate artificial intelligence techniques to support older adults and help them cope with the changes of aging, in particular with cognitive decline.



There's More to Life Than Making Plans: Plan Management in Dynamic, Multiagent Environments

AI Magazine

For many years, research in AI plan generation was governed by a number of strong, simplifying assumptions: The planning agent is omniscient, its actions are deterministic and instantaneous, its goals are fixed and categorical, and its environment is static. More recently, researchers have developed expanded planning algorithms that are not predicated on such assumptions, but changing the way in which plans are formed is only part of what is required when the classical assumptions are abandoned. The demands of dynamic, uncertain environments mean that in addition to being able to form plans -- even probabilistic, uncertain plans -- agents must be able to effectively manage their plans. In this article, which is based on a talk given at the 1998 AAAI Fall Symposium on Distributed, Continual Planning, we first identify reasoning tasks that are involved in plan management, including commitment management, environment monitoring, alternative assessment, plan elaboration, metalevel control, and coordination with other agents. We next survey approaches we have developed to many of these tasks and discuss a plan-management system we are building to ground our theoretical work, by providing us with a platform for integrating our techniques and exploring their value in a realistic problem. Throughout, our discussion is informal and relies on numerous examples; the reader can consult the various papers cited for technical details.


Artificial Intelligence -- A Modern Approach -- A Review

AI Magazine

This book review examines Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach, by Stuart Russell and Peter Norvig, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1995, 932 pp., $62.90, ISBN 0-13-103805-2.


Benchmarks, Test Beds, Controlled Experimentation, and the Design of Agent Architectures

AI Magazine

Benchmarks, test beds, and controlled experimentation are becoming more common. We discuss these issues as they relate to research on agent design. We survey existing test beds for agents and argue for appropriate caution in their use. We end with a debate on the proper role of experimental methodology in the design and validation of planning agents.


Benchmarks, Test Beds, Controlled Experimentation, and the Design of Agent Architectures

AI Magazine

The methodological underpinnings of AI are slowly changing. Benchmarks, test beds, and controlled experimentation are becoming more common. Although we are optimistic that this change can solidify the science of AI, we also recognize a set of difficult issues concerning the appropriate use of this methodology. We discuss these issues as they relate to research on agent design. We survey existing test beds for agents and argue for appropriate caution in their use. We end with a debate on the proper role of experimental methodology in the design and validation of planning agents.