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Collaborating Authors

Pavllo, Dario


Hierarchical Image Classification using Entailment Cone Embeddings

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Image classification has been studied extensively, but there has been limited work in using unconventional, external guidance other than traditional image-label pairs for training. We present a set of methods for leveraging information about the semantic hierarchy embedded in class labels. We first inject label-hierarchy knowledge into an arbitrary CNN-based classifier and empirically show that availability of such external semantic information in conjunction with the visual semantics from images boosts overall performance. Taking a step further in this direction, we model more explicitly the label-label and label-image interactions using order-preserving embeddings governed by both Euclidean and hyperbolic geometries, prevalent in natural language, and tailor them to hierarchical image classification and representation learning. We empirically validate all the models on the hierarchical ETHEC dataset.


Modeling Human Motion with Quaternion-based Neural Networks

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Previous work on predicting or generating 3D human pose sequences regresses either joint rotations or joint positions. The former strategy is prone to error accumulation along the kinematic chain, as well as discontinuities when using Euler angles or exponential maps as parameterizations. The latter requires re-projection onto skeleton constraints to avoid bone stretching and invalid configurations. This work addresses both limitations. QuaterNet represents rotations with quaternions and our loss function performs forward kinematics on a skeleton to penalize absolute position errors instead of angle errors. We investigate both recurrent and convolutional architectures and evaluate on short-term prediction and long-term generation. For the latter, our approach is qualitatively judged as realistic as recent neural strategies from the graphics literature. Our experiments compare quaternions to Euler angles as well as exponential maps and show that only a very short context is required to make reliable future predictions. Finally, we show that the standard evaluation protocol for Human3.6M produces high variance results and we propose a simple solution.