Nirenburg, Sergei




OntoAgents Gauge Their Confidence In Language Understanding

AAAI Conferences

This paper details how OntoAgents, language-endowed intelligent agents developed in the OntoAgent framework, assess their confidence in understanding language inputs. It presents scoring heuristics for the following subtasks of natural language understanding: lexical disambiguation and the establishment of semantic dependencies; reference resolution; nominal compounding; the treatment of fragments; and the interpretation of indirect speech acts. The scoring of confidence in individual linguistic subtasks is a prerequisite for computing the overall confidence in the understanding of an utterance. This, in turn, is a prerequisite for the agent’s deciding how to act upon that level of understanding.


Reference-Related Memory Management in Intelligent Agents Emulating Humans

AAAI Conferences

For intelligent agents modeled to emulate people, reference resolution is memory management: when processing an object or event – whether it appears in language or in the simulated physical or cognitive experience of the agent – the agent must determine how that object or event correlates with known objects and events, and must store the new memory with semantically explicit links to related prior knowledge. This paper discusses eventualities for memory-based reference resolution and the modeling strategies used in the OntoAgent environment to permit agents to fully and automatically make reference decisions.


Aspects of Metacognitive Self-Awareness in Maryland Virtual Patient

AAAI Conferences

This paper describes Maryland Virtual Patient (MVP), a simulation and tutoring environment developed to support training cognitive decision making in clinical medicine. MVP is implemented as a society of agents, with one role – that of the trainee – played by a human and other roles played by artificial intelligent agents. In order to make the trainee’s experience as similar as possible to the traditional medical training environment, MVP is implemented as a collection of knowledge-based models of simulated human-like perception, reasoning and action processes. MVP operation involves metacognition: for example, the MVP virtual patient is aware of the physiological state of its body, of its physiological and character traits as well as of lacunae in its knowledge about the world and about language. This self-awareness influences the virtual patient’s reasoning and actions. In this paper we illustrate the role of metacognitive self-awareness in the overall operation of MVP.


Cognitive Modeling for Clinical Medicine

AAAI Conferences

This paper describes some functionalities and features of the Maryland Virtual Patient (MVP) environment. MVP models the process of disease progression, diagnosis and treatment in virtual patients who are endowed with a “body,” a simulation of their physiological and pathological processes, and a “mind,” a set of capabilities of perception, reasoning and action that allow the virtual patient to exhibit independent behavior, participate in a natural language dialog, remember events, hold beliefs about other agents and about specific object and event instances, make decisions and learn.


Reports of the AAAI 2009 Spring Symposia

AI Magazine

The titles of the nine symposia were Agents that Learn from Human Teachers, Benchmarking of Qualitative Spatial and Temporal Reasoning Systems, Experimental Design for Real-World Systems, Human Behavior Modeling, Intelligent Event Processing, Intelligent Narrative Technologies II, Learning by Reading and Learning to Read, Social Semantic Web: Where Web 2.0 Meets Web 3.0, and Technosocial Predictive Analytics. The aim of the Benchmarking of Qualitative Spatial and Temporal Reasoning Systems symposium was to initiate the development of a problem repository in the field of qualitative spatial and temporal reasoning and identify a graded set of challenges for future midterm and long-term research. The Intelligent Event Processing symposium discussed the need for more AI-based approaches in event processing and defined a kind of research agenda for the field, coined as intelligent complex event processing (iCEP). The Intelligent Narrative Technologies II AAAI symposium discussed innovations, progress, and novel techniques in the research domain.


Reports of the AAAI 2009 Spring Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, was pleased to present the 2009 Spring Symposium Series, held Monday through Wednesday, March 23–25, 2009 at Stanford University. The titles of the nine symposia were Agents that Learn from Human Teachers, Benchmarking of Qualitative Spatial and Temporal Reasoning Systems, Experimental Design for Real-World Systems, Human Behavior Modeling, Intelligent Event Processing, Intelligent Narrative Technologies II, Learning by Reading and Learning to Read, Social Semantic Web: Where Web 2.0 Meets Web 3.0, and Technosocial Predictive Analytics. The goal of the Agents that Learn from Human Teachers was to investigate how we can enable software and robotics agents to learn from real-time interaction with an everyday human partner. The aim of the Benchmarking of Qualitative Spatial and Temporal Reasoning Systems symposium was to initiate the development of a problem repository in the field of qualitative spatial and temporal reasoning and identify a graded set of challenges for future midterm and long-term research. The Experimental Design symposium discussed the challenges of evaluating AI systems. The Human Behavior Modeling symposium explored reasoning methods for understanding various aspects of human behavior, especially in the context of designing intelligent systems that interact with humans. The Intelligent Event Processing symposium discussed the need for more AI-based approaches in event processing and defined a kind of research agenda for the field, coined as intelligent complex event processing (iCEP). The Intelligent Narrative Technologies II AAAI symposium discussed innovations, progress, and novel techniques in the research domain. The Learning by Reading and Learning to Read symposium explored two aspects of making natural language texts semantically accessible to, and processable by, machines. The Social Semantic Web symposium focused on the real-world grand challenges in this area. Finally, the Technosocial Predictive Analytics symposium explored new methods for anticipatory analytical thinking that provide decision advantage through the integration of human and physical models.


AAAI Fall Symposium Reports

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence presented the 2007 Fall Symposium Series on Friday through Sunday, November 9–11, at the Westin Arlington Gateway, Arlington, Virginia. The titles of the seven symposia were (1) AI and Consciousness: Theoretical Foundations and Current Approaches, (2) Artificial Intelligence for Prognostics, (3) Cognitive Approaches to Natural Language Processing, (4) Computational Approaches to Representation Change during Learning and Development, (5) Emergent Agents and Socialities: Social and Organizational Aspects of Intelligence, (6) Intelligent Narrative Technologies, and (7) Regarding the "Intelligence" in Distributed Intelligent Systems.


AAAI Fall Symposium Reports

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence presented the 2007 Fall Symposium Series on Friday through Sunday, November 9–11, at the Westin Arlington Gateway, Arlington, Virginia. The titles of the seven symposia were (1) AI and Consciousness: Theoretical Foundations and Current Approaches, (2) Artificial Intelligence for Prognostics, (3) Cognitive Approaches to Natural Language Processing, (4) Computational Approaches to Representation Change during Learning and Development, (5) Emergent Agents and Socialities: Social and Organizational Aspects of Intelligence, (6) Intelligent Narrative Technologies, and (7) Regarding the “Intelligence” in Distributed Intelligent Systems.