Mueller, Erik T.


Using Thought-Provoking Children's Questions to Drive Artificial Intelligence Research

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

We propose to use thought-provoking children's questions (TPCQs), namely Highlights BrainPlay questions, as a new method to drive artificial intelligence research and to evaluate the capabilities of general-purpose AI systems. These questions are designed to stimulate thought and learning in children, and they can be used to do the same thing in AI systems, while demonstrating the system's reasoning capabilities to the evaluator. We introduce the TPCQ task, which which takes a TPCQ question as input and produces as output (1) answers to the question and (2) learned generalizations. We discuss how BrainPlay questions stimulate learning. We analyze 244 BrainPlay questions, and we report statistics on question type, question class, answer cardinality, answer class, types of knowledge needed, and types of reasoning needed. We find that BrainPlay questions span many aspects of intelligence. Because the answers to BrainPlay questions and the generalizations learned from them are often highly open-ended, we suggest using human judges for evaluation.



Question Answering in Natural Language Narratives Using Symbolic Probabilistic Reasoning

AAAI Conferences

We present a framework to represent and reason about nar- ratives. We build a symbolic probabilistic representation of the temporal sequence of world states and events implied by a narrative using statistical approaches. We show that the combination of this representation together with domain knowledge and symbolic probabilistic reasoning algorithms enables understanding of a narrative and answering semantic questions whose responses are not contained in the narrative. In our experiments, we show the power of our framework (vs. traditional approaches) in answering semantic questions for two domains of RoboCup soccer commentaries and early reader children stories focused on spatial contexts.


Reasoning about RoboCup Soccer Narratives

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

This paper presents an approach for learning to translate simple narratives, i.e., texts (sequences of sentences) describing dynamic systems, into coherent sequences of events without the need for labeled training data. Our approach incorporates domain knowledge in the form of preconditions and effects of events, and we show that it outperforms state-of-the-art supervised learning systems on the task of reconstructing RoboCup soccer games from their commentaries.


In Honor of Marvin Minsky's Contributions on his 80th Birthday

AI Magazine

This article seizes an opportune time to honor Marvin and his contributions and influence in artificial intelligence, science, and beyond. The article provides readers with some personal insights of Minsky from Danny Hillis, John McCarthy, Tom Mitchell, Erik Mueller, Doug Riecken, Aaron Sloman, and Patrick Henry Winston -- all members of the AI community that Minsky helped to found. The article continues with a brief resume of Minsky's research, which spans an enormous range of fields. It concludes with a short biographical account of Minsky's personal history.


In Honor of Marvin Minsky's Contributions on his 80th Birthday

AI Magazine

Marvin Lee Minsky, a founder of the field of artificial intelligence and professor at MIT, celebrated his 80th birthday on August 9, 2007. This article seizes an opportune time to honor Marvin and his contributions and influence in artificial intelligence, science, and beyond. The article provides readers with some personal insights of Minsky from Danny Hillis, John McCarthy, Tom Mitchell, Erik Mueller, Doug Riecken, Aaron Sloman, and Patrick Henry Winston -- all members of the AI community that Minsky helped to found. The article continues with a brief resume of Minsky's research, which spans an enormous range of fields. It concludes with a short biographical account of Minsky's personal history.


Achieving Human-Level Intelligence through Integrated Systems and Research: Introduction to This Special Issue

AI Magazine

Articles in this issue describe recent approaches for integrating algorithms and data structures from diverse subfields of AI. The new applications and significant improvements to existing applications this work has enabled demonstrates the ability of integrated systems and research to continue progress towards human-level artificial intelligence.


Achieving Human-Level Intelligence through Integrated Systems and Research: Introduction to This Special Issue

AI Magazine

This special issue is based on the premise that in order to achieve human-level artificial intelligence researchers will have to find ways to integrate insights from multiple computational frameworks and to exploit insights from other fields that study intelligence. Articles in this issue describe recent approaches for integrating algorithms and data structures from diverse subfields of AI. Much of this work incorporates insights from neuroscience, social and cognitive psychology or linguistics. The new applications and significant improvements to existing applications this work has enabled demonstrates the ability of integrated systems and research to continue progress towards human-level artificial intelligence.