Morris, Robert


Planning, Scheduling and Monitoring for Airport Surface Operations

AAAI Conferences

This paper explores the problem of managing movements of aircraft along the surface of busy airports. Airport surface management is a complex logistics problem involving the coordination of humans and machines. The work described here arose from the idea that autonomous towing vehicles for taxiing aircraft could offer a solution to the 'capacity problem' for busy airports, the problem of getting more efficient use of existing surface area to meet increasing demand. Supporting autonomous surface operations requires continuous planning, scheduling and monitoring of operations, as well as systems for optimizing complex human-machine interaction. We identify a set of computational subproblems of the surface management problem that would benefit from recent advances in multi-agent planning and scheduling and probabilistic predictive modeling, and discuss preliminary work at integrating these components into a prototype of a surface management system.


A Summary of the Twenty-Ninth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence

AI Magazine

The Twenty-Ninth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, (AAAI-15) was held in January 2015 in Austin, Texas (USA) The conference program was cochaired by Sven Koenig and Blai Bonet. This report contains reflective summaries of the main conference, the robotics program, the AI and robotics workshop, the virtual agent exhibition, the what's hot track, the competition panel, the senior member track, student and outreach activities, the student abstract and poster program, the doctoral consortium, the women's mentoring event, and the demonstrations program.


A Summary of the Twenty-Ninth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence

AI Magazine

The Twenty-Ninth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, (AAAI-15) was held in January 2015 in Austin, Texas (USA) The conference program was cochaired by Sven Koenig and Blai Bonet. This report contains reflective summaries of the main conference, the robotics program, the AI and robotics workshop, the virtual agent exhibition, the what's hot track, the competition panel, the senior member track, student and outreach activities, the student abstract and poster program, the doctoral consortium, the women's mentoring event, and the demonstrations program.


Self-Driving Aircraft Towing Vehicles: A Preliminary Report

AAAI Conferences

We introduce an application of self-driving vehicle technology to the problem of towing aircraft at busy airports from gate to runway and runway to gate. Autonomous towing can be supervised by human ramp- or ATC controllers, pilots, or ground crew. The controllers provide route information to the tugs, assisted by an automated route planning system. The planning system and tower and ground controllers work in conjunction with the tugs to make tactical decisions during operations to ensure safe and effective taxiing in a highly dynamic environment. We argue here for the potential for significantly reducing fuel emissions, fuel costs, and community noise, while addressing the added complexity of air terminal operations by increasing efficiency and reducing human workload. This paper describes work-in-progress for developing concepts and capabilities for autonomous engines-off taxiing using towing vehicles.


Optimizing Rotorcraft Approach Trajectories with Acoustic and Land Use Models

AAAI Conferences

Recent increase in interest in using rotorcraft (helicopters and tilt-rotor craft) for public transportation has spurred research in making rotorcraft less noisy, particularly as they land. The ground noise associated with landing trajectories followed by rotorcraft depends in part on the changes in altitude and velocity of the rotorcraft during flight. Acoustic models of ground noise taking altitude and velocity effects into account can be used in an optimization process to determine a set of potentially quieter pilot operations. However, optimizing solely for acoustic properties produces patterns that abstract away from the environment in which the trajectory is flown. A quiet procedure flown over a residential area can create considerable annoyance. To overcome this limitation of acoustic-based optimization we propose a hybrid cost model for optimization that combines acoustic criteria with a land use model that views noise-sensitive areas around landing facilities as weighted obstacles. The result is a 3D route planning problem with obstacles. We introduce a system, called NORA (Noise Optimization for Rotorcraft Approach) that allows for the computation of trajectories that simultaneously solve for acoustically quiet patterns that also avoid land sensitive areas.


Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence

AI Magazine

We are pleased to introduce the space application issue articles in this issue of AI Magazine. The exploration of space is a testament to human curiosity and the desire to understand the universe that we inhabit. As many space agencies around the world design and deploy missions, it is apparent that there is a need for intelligent, exploring systems that can make decisions on their own in remote, potentially hostile environments. At the same time, the monetary cost of operating missions, combined with the growing complexity of the instruments and vehicles being deployed, make it apparent that substantial improvements can be made by the judicious use of automation in mission operations.


Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence

AI Magazine

We are pleased to introduce the space application issue articles in this issue of AI Magazine. The exploration of space is a testament to human curiosity and the desire to understand the universe that we inhabit. As many space agencies around the world design and deploy missions, it is apparent that there is a need for intelligent, exploring systems that can make decisions on their own in remote, potentially hostile environments. At the same time, the monetary cost of operating missions, combined with the growing complexity of the instruments and vehicles being deployed, make it apparent that substantial improvements can be made by the judicious use of automation in mission operations.


The Eighth International Workshop on Planning and Scheduling for Space (IWPSS)

AI Magazine

The Eighth International Workshop on Planning and Scheduling for Space (IWPSS 2013) was held on March 25–26 2013 at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. This was the eighth in a regular series that started in 1997.


The Eighth International Workshop on Planning and Scheduling for Space (IWPSS)

AI Magazine

The Eighth International Workshop on Planning and Scheduling for Space (IWPSS 2013) was held on March 25–26 2013 at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. This was the eighth in a regular series that started in 1997.