Michalowski, Martin


Reports of the Workshops of the Thirty-First AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence

AI Magazine

Reports of the Workshops of the Thirty-First AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence


Reports of the 2016 AAAI Workshop Program

AI Magazine

The Workshop Program of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence's Thirtieth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-16) was held at the beginning of the conference, February 12-13, 2016. Workshop participants met and discussed issues with a selected focus -- providing an informal setting for active exchange among researchers, developers and users on topics of current interest. To foster interaction and exchange of ideas, the workshops were kept small, with 25-65 participants. Attendance was sometimes limited to active participants only, but most workshops also allowed general registration by other interested individuals.


Reports on the 2014 AAAI Fall Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The AAAI 2014 Fall Symposium Series was held Thursday through Saturday, November 13–15, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia adjacent to Washington, DC. The titles of the seven symposia were Artificial Intelligence for Human-Robot Interaction, Energy Market Prediction, Expanding the Boundaries of Health Informatics Using AI, Knowledge, Skill, and Behavior Transfer in Autonomous Robots, Modeling Changing Perspectives: Reconceptualizing Sensorimotor Experiences, Natural Language Access to Big Data, and The Nature of Humans and Machines: A Multidisciplinary Discourse. The highlights of each symposium are presented in this report.



Bayesian Learning of Generalized Board Positions for Improved Move Prediction in Computer Go

AAAI Conferences

Computer Go presents a challenging problem for machine learning agents. With the number of possible board states estimated to be larger than the number of hydrogen atoms in the universe, learning effective policies or board evaluation functions is extremely difficult. In this paper we describe Cortigo, a system that efficiently and autonomously learns useful generalizations for large state-space classification problems such as Go. Cortigo uses a hierarchical generative model loosely related to the human visual cortex to recognize Go board positions well enough to suggest promising next moves. We begin by briefly describing and providing motivation for research in the computer Go domain. We describe Cortigo’s ability to learn predictive models based on large subsets of the Go board and demonstrate how using Cortigo’s learned models as additive knowledge in a state-of-the-art computer Go player (Fuego) significantly improves its playing strength.