Meeden, Lisa


The Pyro Toolkit for AI and Robotics

AI Magazine

This article introduces Pyro, an open-source Python robotics toolkit for exploring topics in AI and robotics.


The Pyro Toolkit for AI and Robotics

AI Magazine

This article introduces Pyro, an open-source Python robotics toolkit for exploring topics in AI and robotics. We present key abstractions that allow Pyro controllers to run unchanged on a variety of real and simulated robots. We demonstrate Pyro's use in a set of curricular modules. We then describe how Pyro can provide a smooth transition for the student from symbolic agents to real-world robots, which significantly reduces the cost of learning to use robots. Finally we show how Pyro has been successfully integrated into existing AI and robotics courses.


Reports on the 2005 AAAI Spring Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence presented its 2005 Spring Symposium Series on Monday through Wednesday, March 21-23, 2005 at Stanford University in Stanford, California. The topics of the eight symposia in this symposium series were (1) AI Technologies for Homeland Security; (2) Challenges to Decision Support in a Changing World; (3) Developmental Robotics; (4) Dialogical Robots: Verbal Interaction with Embodied Agents and Situated Devices; (5) Knowledge Collection from Volunteer Contributors; (6) Metacognition in Computation; (7) Persistent Assistants: Living and Working with AI; and (8) Reasoning with Mental and External Diagrams: Computational Modeling and Spatial Assistance.


Reports on the 2005 AAAI Spring Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence presented its 2005 Spring Symposium Series on Monday through Wednesday, March 21-23, 2005 at Stanford University in Stanford, California. The topics of the eight symposia in this symposium series were (1) AI Technologies for Homeland Security; (2) Challenges to Decision Support in a Changing World; (3) Developmental Robotics; (4) Dialogical Robots: Verbal Interaction with Embodied Agents and Situated Devices; (5) Knowledge Collection from Volunteer Contributors; (6) Metacognition in Computation; (7) Persistent Assistants: Living and Working with AI; and (8) Reasoning with Mental and External Diagrams: Computational Modeling and Spatial Assistance.


The AAAI 1999 Mobile Robot Competitions and Exhibitions

AI Magazine

The Eighth Annual Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition was held as part of the Sixteenth National Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Orlando, Florida, 18 to 22 July. The goals of these robot events are to foster the sharing of research and technology, allow research groups to showcase their achievements, encourage students to enter robotics and AI fields at both the undergraduate and graduate level, and increase awareness of the field. The 1999 events included two robot contests; a new, long-term robot challenge; an exhibition; and a National Botball Championship for high school teams sponsored by the KISS Institute. Each of these events is described in detail in this article.


The AAAI 1999 Mobile Robot Competitions and Exhibitions

AI Magazine

The Eighth Annual Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition was held as part of the Sixteenth National Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Orlando, Florida, 18 to 22 July. The goals of these robot events are to foster the sharing of research and technology, allow research groups to showcase their achievements, encourage students to enter robotics and AI fields at both the undergraduate and graduate level, and increase awareness of the field. The 1999 events included two robot contests; a new, long-term robot challenge; an exhibition; and a National Botball Championship for high school teams sponsored by the KISS Institute. Each of these events is described in detail in this article.


Robot Learning a New Subfield? The Robolearn-96 Workshop

AI Magazine

This article posits the idea of robot learning as a new subfield. The results of the Robolearn-96 Workshop provide evidence that learning in modern robotics is distinct from traditional machine learning. The article examines the role of robotics in the social and natural sciences and the potential impact of learning on robotics, generating both a continuum of research issues and a description of the divergent terminology, target domains, and standards of proof associated with robot learning. The article argues that although robot learning is a new subfield, there is significant potential for synergy with traditional machine learning if the differences in research cultures can be overcome.