McGuinness, Deborah L.


Exploiting Task-Oriented Resources to Learn Word Embeddings for Clinical Abbreviation Expansion

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In the medical domain, identifying and expanding abbreviations in clinical texts is a vital task for both better human and machine understanding. It is a challenging task because many abbreviations are ambiguous especially for intensive care medicine texts, in which phrase abbreviations are frequently used. Besides the fact that there is no universal dictionary of clinical abbreviations and no universal rules for abbreviation writing, such texts are difficult to acquire, expensive to annotate and even sometimes, confusing to domain experts. This paper proposes a novel and effective approach -- exploiting task-oriented resources to learn word embeddings for expanding abbreviations in clinical notes. We achieved 82.27\% accuracy, close to expert human performance.


Reports of the AAAI 2011 Fall Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the 2011 Fall Symposium Series, held Friday through Sunday, November 4–6, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia. The titles of the seven symposia are as follows: (1) Advances in Cognitive Systems; (2) Building Representations of Common Ground with Intelligent Agents; (3) Complex Adaptive Systems: Energy, Information and Intelligence; (4) Multiagent Coordination under Uncertainty; (5) Open Government Knowledge: AI Opportunities and Challenges; (6) Question Generation; and (7) Robot-Human Teamwork in Dynamic Adverse Environment. The highlights of each symposium are presented in this report.


Reports of the AAAI 2011 Fall Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the 2011 Fall Symposium Series, held Friday through Sunday, November 4–6, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia. The titles of the seven symposia are as follows: (1) Advances in Cognitive Systems; (2) Building Representations of Common Ground with Intelligent Agents; (3) Complex Adaptive Systems: Energy, Information and Intelligence; (4) Multiagent Coordination under Uncertainty; (5) Open Government Knowledge: AI Opportunities and Challenges; (6) Question Generation; and (7) Robot-Human Teamwork in Dynamic Adverse Environment. The highlights of each symposium are presented in this report.


Reports of the AAAI 2010 Spring Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, is pleased to present the 2010 Spring Symposium Series, to be held Monday through Wednesday, March 22–24, 2010 at Stanford University. The titles of the seven symposia are Artificial Intelligence for Development; Cognitive Shape Processing; Educational Robotics and Beyond: Design and Evaluation; Embedded Reasoning: Intelligence in Embedded Systems Intelligent Information Privacy Management; It's All in the Timing: Representing and Reasoning about Time in Interactive Behavior; and Linked Data Meets Artificial Intelligence.


Reports of the AAAI 2010 Spring Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University’s Department of Computer Science, is pleased to present the 2010 Spring Symposium Series, to be held Monday through Wednesday, March 22–24, 2010 at Stanford University. The titles of the seven symposia are Artificial Intelligence for Development; Cognitive Shape Processing; Educational Robotics and Beyond: Design and Evaluation; Embedded Reasoning: Intelligence in Embedded Systems Intelligent Information Privacy Management; It’s All in the Timing: Representing and Reasoning about Time in Interactive Behavior; and Linked Data Meets Artificial Intelligence.


Integrity Constraints in OWL

AAAI Conferences

In many data-centric semantic web applications, it is desirable to use OWL to encode the Integrity Constraints (IC) that must be satisfied by instance data. However, challenges arise due to the Open World Assumption (OWA) and the lack of a Unique Name Assumption (UNA) in OWL’s standard semantics. In particular, conditions that trigger constraint violations in systems using the ClosedWorld Assumption (CWA), will generate new inferences in standard OWL-based reasoning applications. In this paper, we present an alternative IC semantics for OWL that allows applications to work with the CWA and the weak UNA. Ontology modelers can choose which OWL axioms to be interpreted with our IC semantics. Thus application developers are able to combine open world reasoning with closed world constraint validation in a flexible way. We also show that IC validation can be reduced to query answering under certain conditions. Finally, we describe our prototype implementation based on the OWL reasoner Pellet.


Towards Faceted Browsing over Linked Data

AAAI Conferences

As the pace of Linked data generation and usage increases, so does the interest in intelligent, usable, and scalable browsing tools. Faceted browsing has potential to provide a foundation for effective dataset navigation. In this paper, we will discuss some of the anticipated benefits along with some associated challenges in building the next-generation faceted browsing system for the Web of Linked Data. We also present our initial system design and implementation.


An Ensemble Learning and Problem Solving Architecture for Airspace Management

AAAI Conferences

In this paper we describe the application of a novel learning and problem solving architecture to the domain of airspace management, where multiple requests for the use of airspace need to be reconciled and managed automatically. The key feature of our "Generalized Integrated Learning Architecture" (GILA) is a set of integrated learning and reasoning (ILR) systems coordinated by a central meta-reasoning executive (MRE). Each ILR learns independently from the same training example and contributes to problem-solving in concert with other ILRs as directed by the MRE. Formal evaluations show that our system performs as well as or better than humans after learning from the same training data. Further, GILA outperforms any individual ILR run in isolation, thus demonstrating the power of the ensemble architecture for learning and problem solving.


AAAI 2008 Spring Symposia Reports

AI Magazine

The titles of the eight symposia were as follows: (1) AI Meets Business Rules and Process Management, (2) Architectures for Intelligent Theory-Based Agents, (3) Creative Intelligent Systems, (4) Emotion, Personality, and Social Behavior, (5) Semantic Scientific Knowledge Integration, (6) Social Information Processing, (7) Symbiotic Relationships between Semantic Web and Knowledge Engineering, (8) Using AI to Motivate Greater Participation in Computer Science The goal of the AI Meets Business Rules and Process Management AAAI symposium was to investigate the various approaches and standards to represent business rules, business process management and the semantic web with respect to expressiveness and reasoning capabilities. The Semantic Scientific Knowledge Symposium was interested in bringing together the semantic technologies community with the scientific information technology community in an effort to build the general semantic science information community. The Social Information Processing's goal was to investigate computational and analytic approaches that will enable users to harness the efforts of large numbers of other users to solve a variety of information processing problems, from discovering high-quality content to managing common resources. The purpose of the Using AI to Motivate Greater Participation in Computer Science symposium was to identify ways that topics in AI may be used to motivate greater student participation in computer science by highlighting fun, engaging, and intellectually challenging developments in AI-related curriculum at a number of educational levels.


AAAI 2008 Spring Symposia Reports

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) was pleased to present the AAAI 2008 Spring Symposium Series, held Wednesday through Friday, March 26–28, 2008 at Stanford University, California. The titles of the eight symposia were as follows: (1) AI Meets Business Rules and Process Management, (2) Architectures for Intelligent Theory-Based Agents, (3) Creative Intelligent Systems, (4) Emotion, Personality, and Social Behavior, (5) Semantic Scientific Knowledge Integration, (6) Social Information Processing, (7) Symbiotic Relationships between Semantic Web and Knowledge Engineering, (8) Using AI to Motivate Greater Participation in Computer Science The goal of the AI Meets Business Rules and Process Management AAAI symposium was to investigate the various approaches and standards to represent business rules, business process management and the semantic web with respect to expressiveness and reasoning capabilities. The focus of the Architectures for Intelligent Theory-Based Agents AAAI symposium was the definition of architectures for intelligent theory-based agents, comprising languages, knowledge representation methodologies, reasoning algorithms, and control loops. The Creative Intelligent Systems Symposium included five major discussion sessions and a general poster session (in which all contributing papers were presented). The purpose of this symposium was to explore the synergies between creative cognition and intelligent systems. The goal of the Emotion, Personality, and Social Behavior symposium was to examine fundamental issues in affect and personality in both biological and artificial agents, focusing on the roles of these factors in mediating social behavior. The Semantic Scientific Knowledge Symposium was interested in bringing together the semantic technologies community with the scientific information technology community in an effort to build the general semantic science information community. The Social Information Processing's goal was to investigate computational and analytic approaches that will enable users to harness the efforts of large numbers of other users to solve a variety of information processing problems, from discovering high-quality content to managing common resources. The goal of the Symbiotic Relationships between the Semantic Web and Software Engineering symposium was to explore how the lessons learned by the knowledge-engineering community over the past three decades could be applied to the bold research agenda of current workers in semantic web technologies. The purpose of the Using AI to Motivate Greater Participation in Computer Science symposium was to identify ways that topics in AI may be used to motivate greater student participation in computer science by highlighting fun, engaging, and intellectually challenging developments in AI-related curriculum at a number of educational levels. Technical reports of the symposia were published by AAAI Press.