Lieberman, Henry


Remembering Marvin Minsky

AI Magazine

Marvin Minsky, one of the pioneers of artificial intelligence and a renowned mathematicial and computer scientist, died on Sunday, 24 January 2016 of a cerebral hemmorhage. In this article, AI scientists Kenneth D. Forbus (Northwestern University), Benjamin Kuipers (University of Michigan), and Henry Lieberman (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) recall their interactions with Minksy and briefly recount the impact he had on their lives and their research. A remembrance of Marvin Minsky was held at the AAAI Spring Symposium at Stanford University on March 22. Video remembrances of Minsky by Danny Bobrow, Benjamin Kuipers, Ray Kurzweil, Richard Waldinger, and others can be on the sentient webpage1 or on youtube.com.


Reports of the AAAI 2011 Conference Workshops

AI Magazine

The AAAI-11 workshop program was held Sunday and Monday, August 7–18, 2011, at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco in San Francisco, California USA. The AAAI-11 workshop program included 15 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence. The titles of the workshops were Activity Context Representation: Techniques and Languages; Analyzing Microtext; Applied Adversarial Reasoning and Risk Modeling; Artificial Intelligence and Smarter Living: The Conquest of Complexity; AI for Data Center Management and Cloud Computing; Automated Action Planning for Autonomous Mobile Robots; Computational Models of Natural Argument; Generalized Planning; Human Computation; Human-Robot Interaction in Elder Care; Interactive Decision Theory and Game Theory; Language-Action Tools for Cognitive Artificial Agents: Integrating Vision, Action and Language; Lifelong Learning; Plan, Activity, and Intent Recognition; and Scalable Integration of Analytics and Visualization. This article presents short summaries of those events.


User Interface Goals, AI Opportunities

AI Magazine

This is an opinion piece about the relationship between the fields of human-computer interaction (HCI), and artificial intelligence (AI). There is an unjustified perception in HCI that AI is unreliable. There is an unjustified perception in AI that interfaces are merely cosmetic. This article argues that AI's goals of intelligent interfaces would benefit enormously by the user-centered design and testing principles of HCI.


Reports on the 2005 AAAI Spring Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence presented its 2005 Spring Symposium Series on Monday through Wednesday, March 21-23, 2005 at Stanford University in Stanford, California. The topics of the eight symposia in this symposium series were (1) AI Technologies for Homeland Security; (2) Challenges to Decision Support in a Changing World; (3) Developmental Robotics; (4) Dialogical Robots: Verbal Interaction with Embodied Agents and Situated Devices; (5) Knowledge Collection from Volunteer Contributors; (6) Metacognition in Computation; (7) Persistent Assistants: Living and Working with AI; and (8) Reasoning with Mental and External Diagrams: Computational Modeling and Spatial Assistance.


Beating Common Sense into Interactive Applications

AI Magazine

A long-standing dream of artificial intelligence has been to put commonsense knowledge into computers -- enabling machines to reason about everyday life. However, it is widely assumed that the use of common sense in interactive applications will remain impractical for years, until these collections can be considered sufficiently complete and commonsense reasoning sufficiently robust. Recently, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Media Laboratory, we have had some success in applying commonsense knowledge in a number of intelligent interface agents, despite the admittedly spotty coverage and unreliable inference of today's commonsense knowledge systems.