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Collaborating Authors

Kurakin, Alex


AdaMatch: A Unified Approach to Semi-Supervised Learning and Domain Adaptation

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

We extend semi-supervised learning to the problem of domain adaptation to learn significantly higher-accuracy models that train on one data distribution and test on a different one. With the goal of generality, we introduce AdaMatch, a method that unifies the tasks of unsupervised domain adaptation (UDA), semi-supervised learning (SSL), and semi-supervised domain adaptation (SSDA). In an extensive experimental study, we compare its behavior with respective state-of-the-art techniques from SSL, SSDA, and UDA on vision classification tasks. We find AdaMatch either matches or significantly exceeds the state-of-the-art in each case using the same hyper-parameters regardless of the dataset or task. For example, AdaMatch nearly doubles the accuracy compared to that of the prior state-of-the-art on the UDA task for DomainNet and even exceeds the accuracy of the prior state-of-the-art obtained with pre-training by 6.4% when AdaMatch is trained completely from scratch. Furthermore, by providing AdaMatch with just one labeled example per class from the target domain (i.e., the SSDA setting), we increase the target accuracy by an additional 6.1%, and with 5 labeled examples, by 13.6%.


FixMatch: Simplifying Semi-Supervised Learning with Consistency and Confidence

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Semi-supervised learning (SSL) provides an effective means of leveraging unlabeled data to improve a model's performance. In this paper, we demonstrate the power of a simple combination of two common SSL methods: consistency regularization and pseudo-labeling. Our algorithm, FixMatch, first generates pseudo-labels using the model's predictions on weakly-augmented unlabeled images. For a given image, the pseudo-label is only retained if the model produces a high-confidence prediction. The model is then trained to predict the pseudo-label when fed a strongly-augmented version of the same image. Despite its simplicity, we show that FixMatch achieves state-of-the-art performance across a variety of standard semi-supervised learning benchmarks, including 94.93% accuracy on CIFAR-10 with 250 labels and 88.61% accuracy with 40 -- just 4 labels per class. Since FixMatch bears many similarities to existing SSL methods that achieve worse performance, we carry out an extensive ablation study to tease apart the experimental factors that are most important to FixMatch's success. We make our code available at https://github.com/google-research/fixmatch.


ReMixMatch: Semi-Supervised Learning with Distribution Alignment and Augmentation Anchoring

arXiv.org Machine Learning

A BSTRACT We improve the recently-proposed "MixMatch" semi-supervised learning algorithm by introducing two new techniques: distribution alignment and augmentation anchoring. Distribution alignment encourages the marginal distribution of predictions on unlabeled data to be close to the marginal distribution of ground-truth labels. Augmentation anchoring feeds multiple strongly augmented versions of an input into the model and encourages each output to be close to the prediction for a weakly-augmented version of the same input. To produce strong augmentations, we propose a variant of AutoAugment which learns the augmentation policy while the model is being trained. Our new algorithm, dubbed ReMix-Match, is significantly more data-efficient than prior work, requiring between 5 and 16 less data to reach the same accuracy. For example, on CIFAR-10 with 250 labeled examples we reach 93 .73% This can enable the use of large, powerful models when labeling data is expensive or inconvenient. Research on SSL has produced a diverse collection of approaches, including consistency regularization (Sajjadi et al., 2016; Laine & Aila, 2017) which encourages a model to produce the same prediction when the input is perturbed and entropy minimization (Grandvalet & Bengio, 2005) which encourages the model to output high-confidence predictions. The recently proposed "MixMatch" algorithm (Berthelot et al., 2019) combines these techniques in a unified loss function and achieves strong performance on a variety of image classification benchmarks.


High-Fidelity Extraction of Neural Network Models

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Model extraction allows an adversary to steal a copy of a remotely deployed machine learning model given access to its predictions. Adversaries are motivated to mount such attacks for a variety of reasons, ranging from reducing their computational costs, to eliminating the need to collect expensive training data, to obtaining a copy of a model in order to find adversarial examples, perform membership inference, or model inversion attacks. In this paper, we taxonomize the space of model extraction attacks around two objectives: \emph{accuracy}, i.e., performing well on the underlying learning task, and \emph{fidelity}, i.e., matching the predictions of the remote victim classifier on any input. To extract a high-accuracy model, we develop a learning-based attack which exploits the victim to supervise the training of an extracted model. Through analytical and empirical arguments, we then explain the inherent limitations that prevent any learning-based strategy from extracting a truly high-fidelity model---i.e., extracting a functionally-equivalent model whose predictions are identical to those of the victim model on all possible inputs. Addressing these limitations, we expand on prior work to develop the first practical functionally-equivalent extraction attack for direct extraction (i.e., without training) of a model's weights. We perform experiments both on academic datasets and a state-of-the-art image classifier trained with 1 billion proprietary images. In addition to broadening the scope of model extraction research, our work demonstrates the practicality of model extraction attacks against production-grade systems.


Adversarial Examples that Fool both Human and Computer Vision

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Machine learning models are vulnerable to adversarial examples: small changes to images can cause computer vision models to make mistakes such as identifying a school bus as an ostrich. However, it is still an open question whether humans are prone to similar mistakes. Here, we create the first adversarial examples designed to fool humans, by leveraging recent techniques that transfer adversarial examples from computer vision models with known parameters and architecture to other models with unknown parameters and architecture, and by modifying models to more closely match the initial processing of the human visual system. We find that adversarial examples that strongly transfer across computer vision models influence the classifications made by time-limited human observers.