Kortenkamp, David


Procedure Automation: Sharing Work with Users

AAAI Conferences

An area of interest for NASA is the use of procedures as the basis of task automation. The PRIDE software was developed to author and execute electronic procedures for NASA spacecraft and habitat operations. We describe our approach for modeling human-automation work based on a procedure language, and allocating and execution tasks among a human-automation team. We illustrate our approach with examples of collaborative work using procedure automation.


An Ontology-Based Symbol Grounding System for Human-Robot Interaction

AAAI Conferences

This paper presents an ongoing collaboration to develop a perceptual anchoring framework which creates and maintains the symbol-percept links concerning household objects. The paper presents an approach to non-trivialize the symbol system using ontologies and allow for HRI via enabling queries about objects properties, their affordances, and their perceptual characteristics as viewed from the robot (e.g. last seen). This position paper describes in brief the objective of creating a long term perceptual anchoring framework for HRI and outlines the preliminary work done this far.


Sensor-to-Symbol Reasoning for Embedded Intelligence

AAAI Conferences

Sensor-to-symbol conversion lies at the heart of all embedded intelligent systems. The everyday world occupied by human stakeholders is dominated by objects that have symbolic labels. For an embedded intelligent system to operate in such a world it must also be able to segment its sensory stream into objects and label those objects appropriately. It is our position that development of a consistent and flexible sensor-to-symbol reasoning system (or architecture) is a key component of embedded intelligence.


Reports on the 2006 AAAI Fall Symposia

AI Magazine

The American Association for Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the AAAI 2006 Fall Symposium Series, held Friday through Sunday, October 13-15, at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City in Washington, DC. The titles were (1) Aurally Informed Performance: Integrating Ma- chine Listening and Auditory Presentation in Robotic Systems; (2) Capturing and Using Patterns for Evidence Detection; (3) Developmental Systems; (4) Integrating Reasoning into Everyday Applications; (5) Interaction and Emergent Phenomena in Societies of Agents; (6) Semantic Web for Collaborative Knowledge Acquisition; and (7) Spacecraft Autonomy: Using AI to Expand Human Space Exploration.


Reports on the 2006 AAAI Fall Symposia

AI Magazine

The American Association for Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the AAAI 2006 Fall Symposium Series, held Friday through Sunday, October 13-15, at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City in Washington, DC. Seven symposia were held. The titles were (1) Aurally Informed Performance: Integrating Ma- chine Listening and Auditory Presentation in Robotic Systems; (2) Capturing and Using Patterns for Evidence Detection; (3) Developmental Systems; (4) Integrating Reasoning into Everyday Applications; (5) Interaction and Emergent Phenomena in Societies of Agents; (6) Semantic Web for Collaborative Knowledge Acquisition; and (7) Spacecraft Autonomy: Using AI to Expand Human Space Exploration.


2003 AAAI Spring Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, presented the 2003 Spring Symposium Series, Monday through Wednesday, 24-26 March 2003, at Stanford University. The titles of the eight symposia were Agent-Mediated Knowledge Management, Computational Synthesis: From Basic Building Blocks to High- Level Functions, Foundations and Applications of Spatiotemporal Reasoning (FASTR), Human Interaction with Autonomous Systems in Complex Environments, Intelligent Multimedia Knowledge Management, Logical Formalization of Commonsense Reasoning, Natural Language Generation in Spoken and Written Dialogue, and New Directions in Question-Answering Motivation.


2003 AAAI Spring Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, presented the 2003 Spring Symposium Series, Monday through Wednesday, 24-26 March 2003, at Stanford University. The titles of the eight symposia were Agent-Mediated Knowledge Management, Computational Synthesis: From Basic Building Blocks to High- Level Functions, Foundations and Applications of Spatiotemporal Reasoning (FASTR), Human Interaction with Autonomous Systems in Complex Environments, Intelligent Multimedia Knowledge Management, Logical Formalization of Commonsense Reasoning, Natural Language Generation in Spoken and Written Dialogue, and New Directions in Question-Answering Motivation.


GRACE: An Autonomous Robot for the AAAI Robot Challenge

AI Magazine

In an attempt to solve as much of the AAAI Robot Challenge as possible, five research institutions representing academia, industry, and government integrated their research into a single robot named GRACE. This article describes this first-year effort by the GRACE team, including not only the various techniques each participant brought to GRACE but also the difficult integration effort itself.


GRACE: An Autonomous Robot for the AAAI Robot Challenge

AI Magazine

In an attempt to solve as much of the AAAI Robot Challenge as possible, five research institutions representing academia, industry, and government integrated their research into a single robot named GRACE. This article describes this first-year effort by the GRACE team, including not only the various techniques each participant brought to GRACE but also the difficult integration effort itself.


Intelligent Control of a Water-Recovery System: Three Years in the Trenches

AI Magazine

This article discusses our experience building and running an intelligent control system during a three-year period for a National Aeronautics and Space Administration advanced life support (ALS) system. The system under test was known as the Integrated Water-Recovery System (IWRS). We used the 3T intelligent control architecture to produce software that operated autonomously, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, for 16 months. The article details our development approach, the successes and failures of the system, and our lessons learned. We conclude with a summary of spin-off benefits to the AI community and areas of AI research that can be useful for future ALS systems.