Indurkhya, Bipin


Reports of the AAAI 2016 Spring Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, presented the 2016 Spring Symposium Series on Monday through Wednesday, March 21-23, 2016 at Stanford University. The titles of the seven symposia were (1) AI and the Mitigation of Human Error: Anomalies, Team Metrics and Thermodynamics; (2) Challenges and Opportunities in Multiagent Learning for the Real World (3) Enabling Computing Research in Socially Intelligent Human-Robot Interaction: A Community-Driven Modular Research Platform; (4) Ethical and Moral Considerations in Non-Human Agents; (5) Intelligent Systems for Supporting Distributed Human Teamwork; (6) Observational Studies through Social Media and Other Human-Generated Content, and (7) Well-Being Computing: AI Meets Health and Happiness Science.


Incorporating Human Dimension in Autonomous Decision-Making on Moral and Ethical Issues

AAAI Conferences

As autonomous systems are becoming more and more pervasive, they often have to make decisions concerning moral and ethical values. There are many approaches to incorporating moral values in autonomous decision-making that are based on some sort of logical deduction. However, we argue here, in order for decision-making to seem persuasive to humans, it needs to reflect human values and judgments. Employing some insights from our ongoing researchusing features of the blackboard architecture for a context-aware recommender system, and a legal decision-making system that incorporates supra-legal aspects, we aim to explore if this architecture can also be adapted to implement a moral decision-making system that generates rationales that are persuasive to humans. Our vision is that such a system can be used as an advisory system to consider a situation from different moral perspectives, and generate ethical pros and cons of taking a particular course of action in a given context.


Reports on the 2014 AAAI Fall Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The AAAI 2014 Fall Symposium Series was held Thursday through Saturday, November 13–15, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia adjacent to Washington, DC. The titles of the seven symposia were Artificial Intelligence for Human-Robot Interaction, Energy Market Prediction, Expanding the Boundaries of Health Informatics Using AI, Knowledge, Skill, and Behavior Transfer in Autonomous Robots, Modeling Changing Perspectives: Reconceptualizing Sensorimotor Experiences, Natural Language Access to Big Data, and The Nature of Humans and Machines: A Multidisciplinary Discourse. The highlights of each symposium are presented in this report.


Reports on the 2014 AAAI Fall Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The AAAI 2014 Fall Symposium Series was held Thursday through Saturday, November 13–15, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia adjacent to Washington, DC. The titles of the seven symposia were Artificial Intelligence for Human-Robot Interaction, Energy Market Prediction, Expanding the Boundaries of Health Informatics Using AI, Knowledge, Skill, and Behavior Transfer in Autonomous Robots, Modeling Changing Perspectives: Reconceptualizing Sensorimotor Experiences, Natural Language Access to Big Data, and The Nature of Humans and Machines: A Multidisciplinary Discourse. The highlights of each symposium are presented in this report.


A Computational Approach to Re-Interpretation: Generation of Emphatic Poems Inspired by Internet Blogs

AAAI Conferences

We present a system that produces emotionally rich poetry inspired by personalized and empathic interpretation of text, particularly Internet blogs. Our implemented system is based on the blackboard architecture, and generates poetry from a theme that it considers the most inspiring. It also incorporates a model of emotions with an individual optimism rate that defines an affective state. The poems produced by the system contain emotional expressions that describe these feelings. We explain how the system re-conceptualizes the text by the empathic interpretation of its content. We also present how the blackboard architecture may support divergent problem solving in the field of computational creativity.We describe the system architecture and the generation algorithm followed by some illustrative results. Finally, we mention possible continuation of this work by incorporating other language generating systems as well as human experts in the blackboard architecture.


Using Analogy to Transfer Manipulation Skills

AAAI Conferences

We are interested in the manipulation skills required by future service robots performing everyday tasks such as preparing food and cleaning in a typical home environment. Such robots must have a robust set of skills that can be applied in the unpredictable and varying circumstances that arise in everyday life.To succeed in such a setting, a service robot must have a strong ability to transfer old skills to new varied settings. We are inspired by the strong transfer ability demonstrated by infants and toddlers on simple manipulation activities, and we are motivated to try and replicate these abilities in an artificial system.We treat this as a problem of making analogies, and describe a theoretical framework which could account for it. We sketch the ideas of a computational model for implementing the required analogical reasoning.


Reports of the 2013 AAAI Spring Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the AAAI 2013 Spring Symposium Series, held Monday through Wednesday, March 25-27, 2013. The titles of the eight symposia were Analyzing Microtext, Creativity and (Early) Cognitive Development, Data Driven Wellness: From Self-Tracking to Behavior Change, Designing Intelligent Robots: Reintegrating AI II, Lifelong Machine Learning, Shikakeology: Designing Triggers for Behavior Change, Trust and Autonomous Systems, and Weakly Supervised Learning from Multimedia. This report contains summaries of the symposia, written, in most cases, by the cochairs of the symposium.


Reports of the 2013 AAAI Spring Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the AAAI 2013 Spring Symposium Series, held Monday through Wednesday, March 25-27, 2013. The titles of the eight symposia were Analyzing Microtext, Creativity and (Early) Cognitive Development, Data Driven Wellness: From Self-Tracking to Behavior Change, Designing Intelligent Robots: Reintegrating AI II, Lifelong Machine Learning, Shikakeology: Designing Triggers for Behavior Change, Trust and Autonomous Systems, and Weakly Supervised Learning from Multimedia. This report contains summaries of the symposia, written, in most cases, by the cochairs of the symposium.


Creativity and Cognitive Development: The Role of Perceptual Similarity and Analogy

AAAI Conferences

We believe that current research in creativity (especially in artificial intelligence and to a great extent psychology) focuses too much on the product and on exceptional (big-C) creativity. In this paper we want to argue that creative thinking and creative behavior result from the continuation of typical human cognitive development and that by looking into the early stages of this development, we can learn more about creativity. Furthermore, we wish to see analogy as a core mechanism in human cognitive development rather than a special skill among many. Some developmental psychology results that support this claim are reviewed. Analogy and metaphor are also seen as central for the creative process. Whereas mainstream research in artificial creativity and computational models of reasoning by analogy stresses the importance of matching the structure between the source and the target domains, we suggest that perceptual similarities play a much more important role, at least when it comes to creative problem solving. We provide some empirical data to support these claims and discuss their consequences.


Preface

AAAI Conferences

Cross-domain general creativity is probably uniquely human faculty. From a child who constructs a new toy using the old and broken ones, to the scientist who works out a theory and makes a profound impact on human civilization, the process invariably evokes the feelings of surprise, astonishment, and wonder. Though we understand what creativity is at an intuitive level, it has turned out to be quite difficult to define and formally and explore it scientifically.