Green, Nancy


Reports of the AAAI 2011 Conference Workshops

AI Magazine

The AAAI-11 workshop program was held Sunday and Monday, August 7–18, 2011, at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco in San Francisco, California USA. The AAAI-11 workshop program included 15 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence. The titles of the workshops were Activity Context Representation: Techniques and Languages; Analyzing Microtext; Applied Adversarial Reasoning and Risk Modeling; Artificial Intelligence and Smarter Living: The Conquest of Complexity; AI for Data Center Management and Cloud Computing; Automated Action Planning for Autonomous Mobile Robots; Computational Models of Natural Argument; Generalized Planning; Human Computation; Human-Robot Interaction in Elder Care; Interactive Decision Theory and Game Theory; Language-Action Tools for Cognitive Artificial Agents: Integrating Vision, Action and Language; Lifelong Learning; Plan, Activity, and Intent Recognition; and Scalable Integration of Analytics and Visualization. This article presents short summaries of those events.


Reports of the AAAI 2011 Spring Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, presented the 2011 Spring Symposium Series Monday through Wednesday, March 21–23, 2011 at Stanford University. The titles of the eight symposia were AI and Health Communication, Artificial Intelligence and Sustainable Design, AI for Business Agility, Computational Physiology, Help Me Help You: Bridging the Gaps in Human-Agent Collaboration, Logical Formalizations of Commonsense Reasoning, Multirobot Systems and Physical Data Structures, and Modeling Complex Adaptive Systems As If They Were Voting Processes.


Reports of the AAAI 2009 Fall Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the 2009 Fall Symposium Series, held Thursday through Saturday, November 5–7, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia. The Symposium Series was preceded on Wednesday, November 4 by a one-day AI funding seminar. The titles of the seven symposia were as follows: (1) Biologically Inspired Cognitive Architectures, (2) Cognitive and Metacognitive Educational Systems, (3) Complex Adaptive Systems and the Threshold Effect: Views from the Natural and Social Sciences, (4) Manifold Learning and Its Applications, (5) Multirepresentational Architectures for Human-Level Intelligence, (6) The Uses of Computational Argumentation, and (7) Virtual Healthcare Interaction.


AAAI 2006 Spring Symposium Reports

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Computer Science Department, was pleased to present its 2006 Spring Symposium Series held March 27-29, 2006, at Stanford University, California.


The AAAI Spring Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, held the 1998 Spring Symposium Series on 23 to 25 March at Stanford University. The topics of the eight symposia were (1) Applying Machine Learning to Discourse Processing, (2) Integrating Robotic Research: Taking the Next Leap, (3) Intelligent Environments, (4) Intelligent Text Summarization, (5) Interactive and Mixed-Initiative Decision-Theoretic Systems, (6) Multimodal Reasoning, (7) Prospects for a Common-Sense Theory of Causation, and (8) Satisficing Models.


The 1996 AAAI Spring Symposia Reports

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence held its 1996 Spring Symposia Series on March 27 to 29 at Stanford University. This article contains summaries of the eight symposia that were conducted: (1) Acquisition, Learning, and Demonstration: Automating Tasks for Users; (2) Adaptation, Coevolution, and Learning in Multiagent Systems; (3) Artificial Intelligence in Medicine: Applications of Current Technologies; (4) Cognitive and Computational Models of Spatial Representation; (5) Computational Implicature: Computational Approaches to Interpreting and Generating Conversational Implicature; (6) Computational Issues in Learning Models of Dynamic Systems; (7) Machine Learning in Information Access; and (8) Planning with Incomplete Information for Robot Problems.