Goel, Ashok K.




Design of an Online Course on Knowledge-Based AI

AAAI Conferences

In Fall 2014 we offered an online course on Knowledge-Based Artificial Intelligence (KBAI) to about 200 students as part of the Georgia Tech Online MS in CS program. By now we have offered the course to more than 1000 students. We describe the design, development and delivery of the online KBAI class in Fall 2014.


Biologically Inspired Design: A New Paradigm for AI Research on Computational Sustainability?

AAAI Conferences

Much AI research on computational sustainability has focused on monitoring, modeling, analysis, and optimization of existing systems and processes. In this article, we present another exciting and promising paradigm for AI research on computational sustainability that emphasizes design of new systems and processes, and, in particular, on biologically inspired design. We first characterize biologically inspired design, then examine its relationship with environmental sustainability, next present a computational model of the process of biologically inspired design, and finally describe a few computational systems for supporting biologically inspired design practice.


A Visual Analogy Approach to Source Case Retrieval in Robot Learning from Observation

AAAI Conferences

Learning by observation is an important goal in developing complete intelligent robots that learn interactively. We present a visual analogy approach toward an integrated, intelligent system capable of learning skills from observation. In particular, we focus on the task of retrieving a previously acquired case similar to a new, observed skill. We describe three approaches to case retrieval: feature matching, feature transformation, and fractal analogy. SIFT features and fractal encoding were used to represent the visual state prior to the skill demonstration, the final state after the skill has been executed, and the visual transformation between the two states. We discovered that the three methods (feature matching, feature transformation, and fractal analogy) are useful for retrieval of similar skill cases under different conditions pertaining to the observed skills.


Learning about Representational Modality: Design and Programming Projects for Knowledge-Based AI

AAAI Conferences

Many AI courses include design and programming projects that provide students with opportunities for experiential learning. Design and programming projects in courses on knowledge-based AI typically explore topics in knowledge, memory, reasoning, and learning. Traditional AI curricula, however, seldom highlight issues of modality of representations, often focusing solely on propositional representations. In this paper, we report on an investigation into learning about representational modality through a series of projects based around geometric analogy problems similar to the Raven’s Progressive Matrices test of intelligence. We conducted this experiment over three years, from Fall 2010 through Fall 2012, in a class on knowledge-based AI. We used the methodology of action research in which the teacher is also the researcher. We discovered that students found these projects motivating, engaging, and challenging, in several cases investing significant time and posting their work online. From our perspective, the projects accomplished the goal of learning about representational modality in addition to knowledge representation and reasoning.


Design Patterns and Cross-Domain Analogies in Biologically Inspired Sustainable Design

AAAI Conferences

Sustainable design is as an important movement in design. Biologically inspired design is a major paradigm for sustainable design. In this paper, we analyze a corpus of biologically inspired design projects in terms of sustainability. We then describe a case study of analogical design of a fog harvesting net, and abstract from it the patterns of Hydrophobia and Hydrophilia. We indicate how these two function-mechanism design patterns occur in several design projects in our corpus. This analysis indicates how biologically inspired sustainable design can be analyzed in terms of cross-domain analogical transfer of design patterns.


Integrating Case-Based and Model-Based Reasoning: A Computational Model of Design Problem Solving

AI Magazine

My Ph.D. dissertation (Goel 1989) presents a computational model of experience-based design. It first reviews the core issues in experience-based design, for example, (1) the content of a design experience (or case), (2) the internal organization of design cases, (3) the language for indexing the cases, (4) the mechanism for retrieving a case relevant to a given design task, (5) the mechanism for adapting a retrieved design to satisfy the constraints of the design task, (6) the mechanism for evaluating a design against the specification of the design task, (7) the mechanism for redesigning a failed design, (8) the mechanism for acquiring new design knowledge, (9) the mechanism for chunking information about a design into a new case, and (10) the mechanism for storing a new case in memory for potential reuse in the future. It then proposes that decisions about these issues might lie in the designer's comprehension of the designs of artifacts he/she has encountered in the past, that is, in his/her mental models of how the designs achieve the functions and satisfy the constraints of the artifacts.


Integrating Case-Based and Model-Based Reasoning: A Computational Model of Design Problem Solving

AI Magazine

My Ph.D. dissertation (Goel 1989) presents a computational model of experience-based design. It first reviews the core issues in experience-based design, for example, (1) the content of a design experience (or case), (2) the internal organization of design cases, (3) the language for indexing the cases, (4) the mechanism for retrieving a case relevant to a given design task, (5) the mechanism for adapting a retrieved design to satisfy the constraints of the design task, (6) the mechanism for evaluating a design against the specification of the design task, (7) the mechanism for redesigning a failed design, (8) the mechanism for acquiring new design knowledge, (9) the mechanism for chunking information about a design into a new case, and (10) the mechanism for storing a new case in memory for potential reuse in the future. It then proposes that decisions about these issues might lie in the designer's comprehension of the designs of artifacts he/she has encountered in the past, that is, in his/her mental models of how the designs achieve the functions and satisfy the constraints of the artifacts.


Basic Artificial Intelligence Research at the Georgia Institute of Technology

AI Magazine

AI research is conducted at a number of academic and research units at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Some of this research is basic in nature, and some has an applied character to it. This article briefly describes basic AI research in the College of Computing at Georgia Tech.