Getoor, Lise


Hinge-Loss Markov Random Fields and Probabilistic Soft Logic

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

A fundamental challenge in developing high-impact machine learning technologies is balancing the need to model rich, structured domains with the ability to scale to big data. Many important problem areas are both richly structured and large scale, from social and biological networks, to knowledge graphs and the Web, to images, video, and natural language. In this paper, we introduce two new formalisms for modeling structured data, and show that they can both capture rich structure and scale to big data. The first, hinge-loss Markov random fields (HL-MRFs), is a new kind of probabilistic graphical model that generalizes different approaches to convex inference. We unite three approaches from the randomized algorithms, probabilistic graphical models, and fuzzy logic communities, showing that all three lead to the same inference objective. We then define HL-MRFs by generalizing this unified objective. The second new formalism, probabilistic soft logic (PSL), is a probabilistic programming language that makes HL-MRFs easy to define using a syntax based on first-order logic. We introduce an algorithm for inferring most-probable variable assignments (MAP inference) that is much more scalable than general-purpose convex optimization methods, because it uses message passing to take advantage of sparse dependency structures. We then show how to learn the parameters of HL-MRFs. The learned HL-MRFs are as accurate as analogous discrete models, but much more scalable. Together, these algorithms enable HL-MRFs and PSL to model rich, structured data at scales not previously possible.


Capturing Planned Protests from Open Source Indicators

AI Magazine

Civil unrest events (protests, strikes, and “occupy” events) are common occurrences in both democracies and authoritarian regimes. The study of civil unrest is a key topic for political scientists as it helps capture an important mechanism by which citizenry express themselves. In countries where civil unrest is lawful, qualitative analysis has revealed that more than 75 percent of the protests are planned, organized, or announced in advance; therefore detecting references to future planned events in relevant news and social media is a direct way to develop a protest forecasting system. We report on a system for doing that in this article. It uses a combination of keyphrase learning to identify what to look for, probabilistic soft logic to reason about location occurrences in extracted results, and time normalization to resolve future time mentions. We illustrate the application of our system to 10 countries in Latin America: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, El Salvador, Mexico, Paraguay, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Results demonstrate our successes in capturing significant societal unrest in these countries with an average lead time of 4.08 days. We also study the selective superiorities of news media versus social media (Twitter, Facebook) to identify relevant trade-offs.


Using Semantics and Statistics to Turn Data into Knowledge

AI Magazine

Many information extraction and knowledge base construction systems are addressing the challenge of deriving knowledge from text. In this article, we represent the desired knowledge base as a knowledge graph and introduce the problem of knowledge graph identification, collectively resolving the entities, labels, and relations present in the knowledge graph. Knowledge graph identification requires reasoning jointly over millions of extractions simultaneously, posing a scalability challenge to many approaches. We use probabilistic soft logic (PSL), a recently-introduced statistical relational learning framework, to implement an efficient solution to knowledge graph identification and present state-of-the-art results for knowledge graph construction while performing an order of magnitude faster than competing methods.


Using Semantics and Statistics to Turn Data into Knowledge

AI Magazine

Many information extraction and knowledge base construction systems are addressing the challenge of deriving knowledge from text. A key problem in constructing these knowledge bases from sources like the web is overcoming the erroneous and incomplete information found in millions of candidate extractions. To solve this problem, we turn to semantics — using ontological constraints between candidate facts to eliminate errors. In this article, we represent the desired knowledge base as a knowledge graph and introduce the problem of knowledge graph identification, collectively resolving the entities, labels, and relations present in the knowledge graph. Knowledge graph identification requires reasoning jointly over millions of extractions simultaneously, posing a scalability challenge to many approaches. We use probabilistic soft logic (PSL), a recently-introduced statistical relational learning framework, to implement an efficient solution to knowledge graph identification and present state-of-the-art results for knowledge graph construction while performing an order of magnitude faster than competing methods.


Hinge-loss Markov Random Fields: Convex Inference for Structured Prediction

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Graphical models for structured domains are powerful tools, but the computational complexities of combinatorial prediction spaces can force restrictions on models, or require approximate inference in order to be tractable. Instead of working in a combinatorial space, we use hinge-loss Markov random fields (HL-MRFs), an expressive class of graphical models with log-concave density functions over continuous variables, which can represent confidences in discrete predictions. This paper demonstrates that HL-MRFs are general tools for fast and accurate structured prediction. We introduce the first inference algorithm that is both scalable and applicable to the full class of HL-MRFs, and show how to train HL-MRFs with several learning algorithms. Our experiments show that HL-MRFs match or surpass the predictive performance of state-of-the-art methods, including discrete models, in four application domains.


A Hypergraph-Partitioned Vertex Programming Approach for Large-scale Consensus Optimization

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In modern data science problems, techniques for extracting value from big data require performing large-scale optimization over heterogenous, irregularly structured data. Much of this data is best represented as multi-relational graphs, making vertex programming abstractions such as those of Pregel and GraphLab ideal fits for modern large-scale data analysis. In this paper, we describe a vertex-programming implementation of a popular consensus optimization technique known as the alternating direction of multipliers (ADMM). ADMM consensus optimization allows elegant solution of complex objectives such as inference in rich probabilistic models. We also introduce a novel hypergraph partitioning technique that improves over state-of-the-art partitioning techniques for vertex programming and significantly reduces the communication cost by reducing the number of replicated nodes up to an order of magnitude. We implemented our algorithm in GraphLab and measure scaling performance on a variety of realistic bipartite graph distributions and a large synthetic voter-opinion analysis application. In our experiments, we are able to achieve a 50% improvement in runtime over the current state-of-the-art GraphLab partitioning scheme.


Scalable Text and Link Analysis with Mixed-Topic Link Models

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Many data sets contain rich information about objects, as well as pairwise relations between them. For instance, in networks of websites, scientific papers, and other documents, each node has content consisting of a collection of words, as well as hyperlinks or citations to other nodes. In order to perform inference on such data sets, and make predictions and recommendations, it is useful to have models that are able to capture the processes which generate the text at each node and the links between them. In this paper, we combine classic ideas in topic modeling with a variant of the mixed-membership block model recently developed in the statistical physics community. The resulting model has the advantage that its parameters, including the mixture of topics of each document and the resulting overlapping communities, can be inferred with a simple and scalable expectation-maximization algorithm. We test our model on three data sets, performing unsupervised topic classification and link prediction. For both tasks, our model outperforms several existing state-of-the-art methods, achieving higher accuracy with significantly less computation, analyzing a data set with 1.3 million words and 44 thousand links in a few minutes.


Utility Elicitation as a Classification Problem

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

We investigate the application of classification techniques to utility elicitation. In a decision problem, two sets of parameters must generally be elicited: the probabilities and the utilities. While the prior and conditional probabilities in the model do not change from user to user, the utility models do. Thus it is necessary to elicit a utility model separately for each new user. Elicitation is long and tedious, particularly if the outcome space is large and not decomposable. There are two common approaches to utility function elicitation. The first is to base the determination of the users utility function solely ON elicitation OF qualitative preferences.The second makes assumptions about the form AND decomposability OF the utility function.Here we take a different approach: we attempt TO identify the new USERs utility function based on classification relative to a database of previously collected utility functions. We do this by identifying clusters of utility functions that minimize an appropriate distance measure. Having identified the clusters, we develop a classification scheme that requires many fewer and simpler assessments than full utility elicitation and is more robust than utility elicitation based solely on preferences. We have tested our algorithm on a small database of utility functions in a prenatal diagnosis domain and the results are quite promising.


Bisimulation-based Approximate Lifted Inference

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

There has been a great deal of recent interest in methods for performing lifted inference; however, most of this work assumes that the first-order model is given as input to the system. Here, we describe lifted inference algorithms that determine symmetries and automatically lift the probabilistic model to speedup inference. In particular, we describe approximate lifted inference techniques that allow the user to trade off inference accuracy for computational efficiency by using a handful of tunable parameters, while keeping the error bounded. Our algorithms are closely related to the graph-theoretic concept of bisimulation. We report experiments on both synthetic and real data to show that in the presence of symmetries, run-times for inference can be improved significantly, with approximate lifted inference providing orders of magnitude speedup over ground inference.


Lifted Graphical Models: A Survey

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

This article presents a survey of work on lifted graphical models. We review a general form for a lifted graphical model, a par-factor graph, and show how a number of existing statistical relational representations map to this formalism. We discuss inference algorithms, including lifted inference algorithms, that efficiently compute the answers to probabilistic queries. We also review work in learning lifted graphical models from data. It is our belief that the need for statistical relational models (whether it goes by that name or another) will grow in the coming decades, as we are inundated with data which is a mix of structured and unstructured, with entities and relations extracted in a noisy manner from text, and with the need to reason effectively with this data. We hope that this synthesis of ideas from many different research groups will provide an accessible starting point for new researchers in this expanding field.