Geib, Christopher


Reports of the Workshops of the Thirty-First AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence

AI Magazine

Reports of the Workshops of the Thirty-First AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence


Building Helpful Virtual Agents Using Plan Recognition and Planning

AAAI Conferences

This paper presents a new model of cooperative behavior based on the interaction of plan recognition and automated planning.  Based on observations of the actions of an "initiator" agent, a  "supporter" agent uses plan recognition to hypothesize the plans  and goals of the initiator.  The supporter agent then proposes and  plans for a set of subgoals it will achieve to help the initiator.  The approach is demonstrated in an open-source, virtual robot  platform.




The AAAI-13 Conference Workshops

AI Magazine

The AAAI-13 Workshop Program, a part of the 27th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, was held Sunday and Monday, July 14–15, 2013 at the Hyatt Regency Bellevue Hotel in Bellevue, Washington, USA. The program included 12 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence, including Activity Context-Aware System Architectures (WS-13-05); Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Methods in Computational Biology (WS-13-06); Combining Constraint Solving with Mining and Learning (WS-13-07); Computer Poker and Imperfect Information (WS-13-08); Expanding the Boundaries of Health Informatics Using Artificial Intelligence (WS-13-09); Intelligent Robotic Systems (WS-13-10); Intelligent Techniques for Web Personalization and Recommendation (WS-13-11); Learning Rich Representations from Low-Level Sensors (WS-13-12); Plan, Activity, and Intent Recognition (WS-13-13); Space, Time, and Ambient Intelligence (WS-13-14); Trading Agent Design and Analysis (WS-13-15); and Statistical Relational Artificial Intelligence (WS-13-16).


Parallelizing Plan Recognition

AAAI Conferences

Modern multi-core computers provide an opportunity to parallelize plan recognition algorithms to decrease runtime. Viewing the problem as one of parsing and performing a complete breadth first search, makes ELEXIR (Engine for LEXicalized Intent Recognition) (Geib '09, Geib '11) particularly suitable for such parallelism. This paper documents the extension of ELEXIR to utilize such modern computing platforms. We will discuss multiple possible algorithms for distributing work between parallel threads and the associated performance wins. We will show, that the best of these algorithms will provide close to linear speedup (up to a maximum number of processors), and that features of the problem domain have an impact on the speedup.


Considering State in Plan Recognition with Lexicalized Grammars

AAAI Conferences

This paper documents extending the ELEXIR (Engine for LEXicalized Intent Recognition) system (Geib 2009; Geib 2011) with a world model. This is a significant increase in the expressiveness of the plan recognition system and allows a number of additions to the algorithm, most significantly conditioning probabilities for recognized plans on the state of the world during execution. Since, ELEXIR falls in the family of gramatical methods for plan recognition in viewing the problem of plan recognition as that of parsing, this paper will also briefly discuss how this extension relates to state of the art proposals in the natural language community regarding probabilistic parsing.


Reports of the AAAI 2011 Conference Workshops

AI Magazine

The AAAI-11 workshop program was held Sunday and Monday, August 7–18, 2011, at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco in San Francisco, California USA. The AAAI-11 workshop program included 15 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence. The titles of the workshops were Activity Context Representation: Techniques and Languages; Analyzing Microtext; Applied Adversarial Reasoning and Risk Modeling; Artificial Intelligence and Smarter Living: The Conquest of Complexity; AI for Data Center Management and Cloud Computing; Automated Action Planning for Autonomous Mobile Robots; Computational Models of Natural Argument; Generalized Planning; Human Computation; Human-Robot Interaction in Elder Care; Interactive Decision Theory and Game Theory; Language-Action Tools for Cognitive Artificial Agents: Integrating Vision, Action and Language; Lifelong Learning; Plan, Activity, and Intent Recognition; and Scalable Integration of Analytics and Visualization. This article presents short summaries of those events.


Reports of the AAAI 2011 Conference Workshops

AI Magazine

The AAAI-11 workshop program was held Sunday and Monday, August 7–18, 2011, at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco in San Francisco, California USA. The AAAI-11 workshop program included 15 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence. The titles of the workshops were Activity Context Representation: Techniques and Languages; Analyzing Microtext; Applied Adversarial Reasoning and Risk Modeling; Artificial Intelligence and Smarter Living: The Conquest of Complexity; AI for Data Center Management and Cloud Computing; Automated Action Planning for Autonomous Mobile Robots; Computational Models of Natural Argument; Generalized Planning; Human Computation; Human-Robot Interaction in Elder Care; Interactive Decision Theory and Game Theory; Language-Action Tools for Cognitive Artificial Agents: Integrating Vision, Action and Language; Lifelong Learning; Plan, Activity, and Intent Recognition; and Scalable Integration of Analytics and Visualization. This article presents short summaries of those events.


Fixing a Hole in Lexicalized Plan Recognition

AAAI Conferences

Previous work has suggested the use of lexicalized grammars for probabilistic plan recognition. Such grammars allow the domain builder to delay commitment to hypothesizing high level goals in order to reduce computational costs. However this delay has limitations. In the case of only partial observation traces, delaying commitment can prevent such algorithms from forming correct conclusions about some goals. This paper presents a heuristic metric to address this limitation. It advocates computing the maximum change in conditional probability across all the computed explanations given the observations explicitly considering a goal of interest.