Fox, Mark S.


General Model of Human Motivation and Goal Ranking

AAAI Conferences

In this article, we describe high-fidelity human behaviour emulation model capable of ranking and re-ranking goals during plan execution based on changing emotional modes of an agent. Our model assumes the agent is rational but its reasoning is bounded. The agent's reasoning process incorporates emotions and basic human needs to emulate changes in human behaviour under cognitive limitations. The majority of cognitive systems that incorporate emotions rely on reactive models that elicit predetermined responses to emotional modes. Our model demonstrates how human emotions change during the execution of a plan independent of specific events that may elicit such responses. The initial goals of the agent are grounded in basic human needs outlined by Maslow's Hierarchy. Once a plan is generated under the cognitive limitations of the agent and execution begins, goals are re-ranked based on an emotional re-evaluation of the plan's progress. The result is a high-fidelity, domain-independent, general theory of motivation based on human needs and emotions. We demonstrate the algorithm with a use-case from the social service domain by emulating the behaviour of homeless clients in response to an intervention program.


Households, The Homeless and Slums Towards a Standard for Representing City Shelter Open Data

AAAI Conferences

In order to compare and analyse open data across cities, standard representations or ontologies have to be created. This paper defines a shelter ontology that includes concepts of shelters, slums, households and homelessness. The design of the ontology is based upon the data requirements of ISO 37120. ISO 37120 defines 100 indicators to measure and compare city performance. There are three shelter-themed indicators defined, namely 15.1 Percentage of city population living in slums, 15.2 Number of homeless per 100 000 population, and 15.3 Percentage of households that exist without registered legal titles. This ontology enables both the representation of the ISO 37120 Shelter theme indicators' definitions, and a city's indicator values and supporting data. This enables the analysis of city indicators by intelligent agents.


An Ontology for Open 311 Data

AAAI Conferences

A major challenge in the analysis of city data is the integration of data from different sources. This paper defines an ontology, called Open 311 Ontology, that provides a unified terminology and a reference model for representing the 311 data. We illustrate how the ontology can be used to map and integrate data from multiple cities, and for answering competency questions.


City Knowledge Patterns: A Standard for Smart City Knowledge Management

AAAI Conferences

In this paper, we describe our efforts in recognizing knowledge requirements of city governments. This model, which we denote as City Knowledge Patterns, is a set of standard Knowledge Patterns identifying the concepts required to represent municipal knowledge.


Foundation Ontologies Requirements for Global City Indicators

AAAI Conferences

City Indicators are metrics used to measure city per- formance. Global City Indicators, as developed by the Global Cities Institute at the University of Toronto, are metrics that have been agreed to by over 250 cities world wide and have been approved as ISO 37120. The definitions of the indicators exist only in written form. The purpose of this research is to provide an ontology for representing the definition of these indi- cators and their instantiation by cities worldwide so that they can shared across the Semantic Web. This paper describes the requirements for the ontology and provides an example of its use.


Building Agents to Serve Customers

AI Magazine

AI agents combining natural language interaction, task planning, and business ontologies can help companies provide better-quality and more costeffective customer service. Our customer-service agents use natural language to interact with customers, enabling customers to state their intentions directly instead of searching for the places on the Web site that may address their concern. Our agents converse with customers, guaranteeing that needed information is acquired from customers and that relevant information is provided to them in order for both parties to make the right decision. The net effect is a more frictionless interaction process that improves the customer experience and makes businesses more competitive on the service front.


Building Agents to Serve Customers

AI Magazine

AI agents combining natural language interaction, task planning, and business ontologies can help companies provide better-quality and more costeffective customer service. Our customer-service agents use natural language to interact with customers, enabling customers to state their intentions directly instead of searching for the places on the Web site that may address their concern. We use planning methods to search systematically for the solution to the customer's problem, ensuring that a resolution satisfactory for both the customer and the company is found, if one exists. Our agents converse with customers, guaranteeing that needed information is acquired from customers and that relevant information is provided to them in order for both parties to make the right decision. The net effect is a more frictionless interaction process that improves the customer experience and makes businesses more competitive on the service front.


A Generic Framework for Constraint-Directed Search and Scheduling

AI Magazine

This article introduces a generic framework for constraint-directed search. The research literature in constraint-directed scheduling is placed within the framework both to provide insight into, and examples of, the framework and to allow a new perspective on the scheduling literature. We show how a number of algorithms from the constraint-directed scheduling research can be conceptualized within the framework. This conceptualization allows us to identify and compare variations of components of our framework and provides new perspective on open research issues. We discuss the prospects for an overall comparison of scheduling strategies and show that firm conclusions vis-a-vis such a comparison are not supported by the literature. Our principal conclusion is the need for an empirical model of both the characteristics of scheduling problems and the solution techniques themselves. Our framework is offered as a tool for the development of such an understanding of constraint-directed scheduling and, more generally, constraint-directed search.


Enterprise Modeling

AI Magazine

To remain competitive, enterprises must become increasingly agile and integrated across their functions. Enterprise models play a critical role in this integration, enabling better designs for enterprises, analysis of their performance, and management of their operations. This article motivates the need for enterprise models and introduces the concepts of generic and deductive enterprise models. It reviews research to date on enterprise modeling and considers in detail the Toronto virtual enterprise effort at the University of Toronto.