Finin, Tim


Platys: From Position to Place-Oriented Mobile Computing

AI Magazine

The Platys project focuses on developing a high-level, semantic notion of location called place. A place, unlike a geospatial position, derives its meaning from a user’s actions and interactions in addition to the physical location where they occur. Our aim is to enable the construction of a large variety of applications that take advantage of place to render relevant content and functionality and thus, improve user experience. We consider elements of context that are particularly related to mobile computing. The main problems we have addressed to realize our place-oriented mobile computing vision, are representing places, recognizing places, engineering place-aware applications. We describe the approaches we have developed for addressing these problems and related subproblems. A key element of our work is the use of collaborative information sharing where users’ devices share and integrate knowledge about places. Our place ontology facilitates such collaboration. Declarative privacy policies allow users to specify contextual features under which they prefer to share or not share their information.


Entity Type Recognition for Heterogeneous Semantic Graphs

AI Magazine

We describe an approach for identifying fine-grained entity types in heterogeneous data graphs that is effective for unstructured data or when the underlying ontologies or semantic schemas are unknown. Identifying fine-grained entity types, rather than a few high-level types, supports coreference resolution in heterogeneous graphs by reducing the number of possible coreference relations that must be considered. For such cases, we use supervised machine learning to map entity attributes and relations to a known set of attributes and relations from appropriate background knowledge bases to predict instance entity types. We evaluated this approach in experiments on data from DBpedia, Freebase, and Arnetminer using DBpedia as the background knowledge base.


Entity Type Recognition for Heterogeneous Semantic Graphs

AI Magazine

We describe an approach for identifying fine-grained entity types in heterogeneous data graphs that is effective for unstructured data or when the underlying ontologies or semantic schemas are unknown. Identifying fine-grained entity types, rather than a few high-level types, supports coreference resolution in heterogeneous graphs by reducing the number of possible coreference relations that must be considered. Big data problems that involve integrating data from multiple sources can benefit from our approach when the datas ontologies are unknown, inaccessible or semantically trivial. For such cases, we use supervised machine learning to map entity attributes and relations to a known set of attributes and relations from appropriate background knowledge bases to predict instance entity types. We evaluated this approach in experiments on data from DBpedia, Freebase, and Arnetminer using DBpedia as the background knowledge base.


David L Waltz, in Memoriam

AI Magazine

Dave Waltz began his career of creativity and collaboration after completing his dissertation in 1972 at the MIT AI Lab. That dissertation created the field of constraint propagation by showing that constraints and a rich but simple descriptive system were sufficient to recover 3-dimensional information from a 2-dimensional projection. Besides an education, Dave picked up a passion for the high-energy atmosphere that propelled the MIT AI Lab to prominence—an atmosphere that he spent the rest of his life recreating


Reports of the AAAI 2011 Fall Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the 2011 Fall Symposium Series, held Friday through Sunday, November 4–6, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia. The titles of the seven symposia are as follows: (1) Advances in Cognitive Systems; (2) Building Representations of Common Ground with Intelligent Agents; (3) Complex Adaptive Systems: Energy, Information and Intelligence; (4) Multiagent Coordination under Uncertainty; (5) Open Government Knowledge: AI Opportunities and Challenges; (6) Question Generation; and (7) Robot-Human Teamwork in Dynamic Adverse Environment. The highlights of each symposium are presented in this report.


Reports of the AAAI 2011 Fall Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the 2011 Fall Symposium Series, held Friday through Sunday, November 4–6, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia. The titles of the seven symposia are as follows: (1) Advances in Cognitive Systems; (2) Building Representations of Common Ground with Intelligent Agents; (3) Complex Adaptive Systems: Energy, Information and Intelligence; (4) Multiagent Coordination under Uncertainty; (5) Open Government Knowledge: AI Opportunities and Challenges; (6) Question Generation; and (7) Robot-Human Teamwork in Dynamic Adverse Environment. The highlights of each symposium are presented in this report.


The Information Ecology of Social Media and Online Communities

AI Magazine

Social media systems such as weblogs, photo- and link-sharing sites, Wikis and on-line forums are currently thought to produce up to one third of new Web content. One thing that sets these ``Web 2.0'' sites apart from traditional Web pages and resources is that they are intertwined with other forms of networked data. Their standard hyperlinks are enriched by social networks, comments, trackbacks, advertisements, tags, RDF data and metadata. We describe recent work on building systems that use models of the Blogosphere to recognize spam blogs, find opinions on topics, identify communities of interest, derive trust relationships, and detect influential bloggers.


Reports on the 2006 AAAI Fall Symposia

AI Magazine

The American Association for Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the AAAI 2006 Fall Symposium Series, held Friday through Sunday, October 13-15, at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City in Washington, DC. The titles were (1) Aurally Informed Performance: Integrating Ma- chine Listening and Auditory Presentation in Robotic Systems; (2) Capturing and Using Patterns for Evidence Detection; (3) Developmental Systems; (4) Integrating Reasoning into Everyday Applications; (5) Interaction and Emergent Phenomena in Societies of Agents; (6) Semantic Web for Collaborative Knowledge Acquisition; and (7) Spacecraft Autonomy: Using AI to Expand Human Space Exploration.


Reports on the 2006 AAAI Fall Symposia

AI Magazine

The American Association for Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the AAAI 2006 Fall Symposium Series, held Friday through Sunday, October 13-15, at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City in Washington, DC. Seven symposia were held. The titles were (1) Aurally Informed Performance: Integrating Ma- chine Listening and Auditory Presentation in Robotic Systems; (2) Capturing and Using Patterns for Evidence Detection; (3) Developmental Systems; (4) Integrating Reasoning into Everyday Applications; (5) Interaction and Emergent Phenomena in Societies of Agents; (6) Semantic Web for Collaborative Knowledge Acquisition; and (7) Spacecraft Autonomy: Using AI to Expand Human Space Exploration.


AAAI 2000 Workshop Reports

AI Magazine

The AAAI-2000 Workshop Program was held Sunday and Monday, 3031 July 2000 at the Hyatt Regency Austin and the Austin Convention Center in Austin, Texas. The 15 workshops held were (1) Agent-Oriented Information Systems, (2) Artificial Intelligence and Music, (3) Artificial Intelligence and Web Search, (4) Constraints and AI Planning, (5) Integration of AI and OR: Techniques for Combinatorial Optimization, (6) Intelligent Lessons Learned Systems, (7) Knowledge-Based Electronic Markets, (8) Learning from Imbalanced Data Sets, (9) Learning Statistical Models from Rela-tional Data, (10) Leveraging Probability and Uncertainty in Computation, (11) Mobile Robotic Competition and Exhibition, (12) New Research Problems for Machine Learning, (13) Parallel and Distributed Search for Reasoning, (14) Representational Issues for Real-World Planning Systems, and (15) Spatial and Temporal Granularity.