Feigenbaum, Edward A.



Happy Silver Anniversary, AI!

AI Magazine

Artificial intelligence (AI), on the twenty-fifth anniversary of its naming, is a "kid, finally grown up." In this letter to his field, Feigenbaum recounts AI's stumbles and successes, its growing pains and maturation, to a place of preeminence among the sciences; standing with molecular biology, particle physics, and cosmology as owners of the best questions of science.


Stories of AAAI -- Before the Beginning and After: A Love Letter

AI Magazine

This article provides a personal perspective, in three stories, on the origins of AAAI. In the first story, I explain the reasons justifying AAAI's existence. In the second story. In the second story, I recount some of the controvery over the name artificial intelligence, and explain why it was chosen as the new society's moniker. In the third story, I note that AI has not suffered from the applied versus research scism that has affected other societies. Finally, in the fourth story, I mention some of the early issues of finance.


In Memoriam: Robert Engelmore

AI Magazine

Robert S. (Bob) Engelmore, who retired in 1998 from the Knowledge Systems Laboratory at Stanford University, died in an ocean accident in Hawaii on March 25, 2003. As the second editor of AI Magazine, he guided its development from 1981 to 1991; he was also elected a fellow of AAAI in 1992. He had been involved in many aspects of AI and was respected for his uncommon common sense and good humor.


Knowledge-Based Systems Research and Applications in Japan, 1992

AI Magazine

Representatives of universities and businesses were chosen by the Japan Technology Evaluation Center to investigate the state of the technology in Japan relative to the United States. The panel's report focused on applications, tools, and research and development in universities and industry and on major national projects.


Knowledge-Based Systems Research and Applications in Japan, 1992

AI Magazine

This article summarizes the findings of a 1992 study of knowledge-based systems research and applications in Japan. Representatives of universities and businesses were chosen by the Japan Technology Evaluation Center to investigate the state of the technology in Japan relative to the United States. The panel's report focused on applications, tools, and research and development in universities and industry and on major national projects.


In Memoriam: Arthur Samuel: Pioneer in Machine Learning

AI Magazine

Arthur Samuel (1901-1990) was a pioneer of artificial intelligence research. From 1949 through the late 1960s, he did the best work in making computers learn from their expe-rience. His vehicle for this work was the game of checkers.


In Memoriam: Arthur Samuel: Pioneer in Machine Learning

AI Magazine

Arthur Samuel (1901-1990) was a pioneer of artificial intelligence research. From 1949 through the late 1960s, he did the best work in making computers learn from their expe-rience. His vehicle for this work was the game of checkers.


Signal-to-Symbol Transformation: HASP/SIAP Case Study

AI Magazine

Artificial intelligence is that part of computer science that concerns itself with the concepts and methods of symbolic inference and symbolic representation of knowledge. But within the last fifteen years, it has concerned itself also with signals -- with the interpretation or understanding of signal data. AI researchers have discussed "signal-to symbol transformations," and their programs have shown how appropriate use of symbolic manipulations can be of great use in making signal processing more effective and efficient. Indeed, the programs for signal understanding have been fruitful, powerful, and among the most widely recognized of AI's achievements.


AAAI President's Message

AI Magazine

Twenty five years is not long in the history of a science--long enough to achieve, short enough to remember. Your esteemed founders are still around -- vigorous, not so young anymore. Out of the cybernetics you came, and information-theoretic psychology. You were born in the early days of modern computing, on hot, bulky hardware with names few now remember, like JOHNNIAC; in strange and wonderful software called list structures, with stacks you could "push down" and "pop-up," bearing arcane acronyms like IPL and FLPL.