Dautenhahn, Kerstin


Adaptive Gesture Extraction and Imitation for Human-Robot Interaction

AAAI Conferences

A robotic system for extracting and imitating gestures in Human-Robot Interaction is presented. Using the iCub robot and RGB-D sensors, contextually important time points are used to mark and ground the gestures. The benefits of this approach are that the gesture imitation appears both visually and behaviourally realistic, the cognitive and computation loads are reduced and no predefined mappings or speech-based annotations are needed. The system is adaptive to individual users and contributes to the creation and maintenance of a smoother interaction.


Analysis of the Limitations of an Experience Metric Space when Used in a Mobile Domestic Robot

AAAI Conferences

This paper introduces the concept and use of an Interaction History Architecture for use on a mobile domestic robot and analyses the limitations of this configuration. The interaction history architecture builds upon Shannon information theory and has been previously used in a humanoid robot to learn basic children’s games. Previous work has shown that experience spaces can be highly flexible when used for learning. In this paper we outline and experiment designed to test the abilities of the architecture and how it can be used with classic clicker style training to teach domestic robots simple tasks. It then presents results from an experiment exploring these capabilities as well as the limitation found therein.


Interaction Histories and Short Term Memory: Enactive Development of Turn-taking Behaviors in a Childlike Humanoid Robot

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In this article, an enactive architecture is described that allows a humanoid robot to learn to compose simple actions into turn-taking behaviors while playing interaction games with a human partner. The robot's action choices are reinforced by social feedback from the human in the form of visual attention and measures of behavioral synchronization. We demonstrate that the system can acquire and switch between behaviors learned through interaction based on social feedback from the human partner. The role of reinforcement based on a short term memory of the interaction is experimentally investigated. Results indicate that feedback based only on the immediate state is insufficient to learn certain turn-taking behaviors. Therefore some history of the interaction must be considered in the acquisition of turn-taking, which can be efficiently handled through the use of short term memory.


As Time Goes By: Representing and Reasoning About Timing in Human-Robot Interaction Studies

AAAI Conferences

We summarise the experimental design issues related to timing in several human-robot interaction scenarios investigating turn-taking or synchronization between child-sized humanoid robots and human participants. Our aim is not to have the humanoid robots just replicate the human’s behaviours (e.g. waving, peek-a-boo, or drumming), but to engage in interactions in a socially appropriate manner. From these various studies, we have identified several ways in which time has an impact on interaction. We have also identified practical concerns about data collection for time-dependent interactions and ways to address them. The conclusions drawn from this work is likely to be useful in informing the design of systems which engage in synchronized or turn-taking interactions with people.


The Third International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction

AI Magazine

The third international conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI-2008) was held in Amsterdam, The Netherland, March 12-15, 2008. The theme of HRI-2008, "Living With Robots", highlights the importance of the technical and social issues underlying human-robot interaction with companion and assistive robots for long-term use in everyday life and work activities. More than two hundred and fifty researchers, practitioners, and exhibitors attended the conference, and many more contributed to the conference as authors or reviewers. HRI-2009 will be held in San Diego, California from March 11-13, 2009.


The Third International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction

AI Magazine

The third international conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI-2008) was held in Amsterdam, The Netherland, March 12-15, 2008. The theme of HRI-2008, "Living With Robots", highlights the importance of the technical and social issues underlying human-robot interaction with companion and assistive robots for long-term use in everyday life and work activities. More than two hundred and fifty researchers, practitioners, and exhibitors attended the conference, and many more contributed to the conference as authors or reviewers. HRI-2009 will be held in San Diego, California from March 11-13, 2009.


AAAI 2000 Fall Symposium Series Reports

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence presented the 2000 Fall Symposium Series was held on Friday through Sunday, 3 to 5 November, at the Sea Crest Oceanfront Conference Center. The titles of the five symposia were (1) Building Dialogue Systems for Tutorial Applications, (2) Learning How to Do Things, (3) Parallel Cognition for Embodied Agents, (4) Simulating Human Agents, and (5) Socially Intelligent Agents: The Human in the Loop.


AAAI 2000 Fall Symposium Series Reports

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence presented the 2000 Fall Symposium Series was held on Friday through Sunday, 3 to 5 November, at the Sea Crest Oceanfront Conference Center. The titles of the five symposia were (1) Building Dialogue Systems for Tutorial Applications, (2) Learning How to Do Things, (3) Parallel Cognition for Embodied Agents, (4) Simulating Human Agents, and (5) Socially Intelligent Agents: The Human in the Loop.


The 1997 AAAI Fall Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence held its 1997 Fall Symposia Series on 7 to 9 November in Cambridge, Massachusetts. This article contains summaries of the six symposia that were conducted: (1) Communicative Action in Humans and Machines, (2) Context in Knowledge Representation and Natural Language, (3) Intelligent Tutoring System Authoring Tools, (4) Model-Directed Autonomous Systems, (5) Reasoning with Diagrammatic Representations II, and (6) Socially Intelligent Agents.


The 1997 AAAI Fall Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence held its 1997 Fall Symposia Series on 7 to 9 November in Cambridge, Massachusetts. This article contains summaries of the six symposia that were conducted: (1) Communicative Action in Humans and Machines, (2) Context in Knowledge Representation and Natural Language, (3) Intelligent Tutoring System Authoring Tools, (4) Model-Directed Autonomous Systems, (5) Reasoning with Diagrammatic Representations II, and (6) Socially Intelligent Agents.