Cunningham, Pádraig


Link Prediction with Social Vector Clocks

arXiv.org Machine Learning

State-of-the-art link prediction utilizes combinations of complex features derived from network panel data. We here show that computationally less expensive features can achieve the same performance in the common scenario in which the data is available as a sequence of interactions. Our features are based on social vector clocks, an adaptation of the vector-clock concept introduced in distributed computing to social interaction networks. In fact, our experiments suggest that by taking into account the order and spacing of interactions, social vector clocks exploit different aspects of link formation so that their combination with previous approaches yields the most accurate predictor to date.


Aggregating Content and Network Information to Curate Twitter User Lists

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Twitter introduced user lists in late 2009, allowing users to be grouped according to meaningful topics or themes. Lists have since been adopted by media outlets as a means of organising content around news stories. Thus the curation of these lists is important - they should contain the key information gatekeepers and present a balanced perspective on a story. Here we address this list curation process from a recommender systems perspective. We propose a variety of criteria for generating user list recommendations, based on content analysis, network analysis, and the "crowdsourcing" of existing user lists. We demonstrate that these types of criteria are often only successful for datasets with certain characteristics. To resolve this issue, we propose the aggregation of these different "views" of a news story on Twitter to produce more accurate user recommendations to support the curation process.


Network Analysis of Recurring YouTube Spam Campaigns

AAAI Conferences

As the popularity of content sharing websites has increased, they have become targets for spam, phishing and the distribution of malware. On YouTube, the facility for users to post comments can be used by spam campaigns to direct unsuspecting users to malicious third-party websites. In this paper, we demonstrate how such campaigns can be tracked over time using network motif profiling, i.e. by tracking counts of indicative network motifs. By considering all motifs of up to five nodes, we identify discriminating motifs that reveal two distinctly different spam campaign strategies, and present an evaluation that tracks two corresponding active campaigns.


Identifying Representative Textual Sources in Blog Networks

AAAI Conferences

We apply methods from social network analysis and visualization to facilitate a study of the Irish blogosphere from a cultural studies perspective.We focus on solving the practical issues that arise when the goal is to perform textual analysis of the corpus produced by a network of bloggers. Previous studies into blogging networks have noted difficulties arising when trying to identify the extent and boundaries of these networks. As a response to calls for increasingly data-led approaches in media and cultural studies, we discuss a variety of social network analysis methods that can be used to identify which blogs can be seen as members of a posited “Irish blogging network” (and hence sources of textual material). We identify hub blogs, communities of sites corresponding to different topics, and representative bloggers within these communities. Based on this study, we propose a set of guidelines for researchers who wish to map out blogging networks.



An Analysis of Current Trends in CBR Research Using Multi-View Clustering

AI Magazine

The European Conference on Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) in 2008 marked 15 years of international and European CBR conferences where almost seven hundred research papers were published. In this report we review the research themes covered in these papers and identify the topics that are active at the moment. The main mechanism for this analysis is a clustering of the research papers based on both co-citation links and text similarity. It is interesting to note that the core set of papers has attracted citations from almost three thousand papers outside the conference collection so it is clear that the CBR conferences are a sub-part of a much larger whole. It is remarkable that the research themes revealed by this analysis do not map directly to the sub-topics of CBR that might appear in a textbook. Instead they reflect the applications-oriented focus of CBR research, and cover the promising application areas and research challenges that are faced.