Cohen, Paul R.


Learning a Skill-Teaching Curriculum with Dynamic Bayes Nets

AAAI Conferences

We propose an intelligent tutoring system that constructs a curriculum of hints and problems in order to teach a student skills with a rich dependency structure. We provide a template for building a multi-layered Dynamic Bayes Net to model this problem and describe how to learn the parameters of the model from data. Planning with the DBN then produces a teaching policy for the given domain. We test this end-to-end curriculum design system in two human-subject studies in the areas of finite field arithmetic and artificial language and show this method performs on par with hand-tuned expert policies.


Human Natural Instruction of a Simulated Electronic Student

AAAI Conferences

Humans naturally use multiple modes of instruction while teaching one another. We would like our robots and artificial agents to be instructed in the same way, rather than programmed. In this paper, we review prior work on human instruction of autonomous agents and present observations from two exploratory pilot studies and the results of a full study investigating how multiple instruction modes are used by humans. We describe our Bootstrapped Learning User Interface, a prototype multiinstruction interface informed by our human-user studies.


Reports of the AAAI 2008 Fall Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the 2008 Fall Symposium Series, held Friday through Sunday, November 7-9, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia. The titles of the seven symposia were (1) Adaptive Agents in Cultural Contexts, (2) AI in Eldercare: New Solutions to Old Problems, (3) Automated Scientific Discovery, (4) Biologically Inspired Cognitive Architectures, (5) Education Informatics: Steps toward the International Internet Classroom, (6) Multimedia Information Extraction, and (7) Naturally Inspired AI.


Reports of the AAAI 2008 Fall Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the 2008 Fall Symposium Series, held Friday through Sunday, November 7-9, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia. The titles of the seven symposia were (1) Adaptive Agents in Cultural Contexts, (2) AI in Eldercare: New Solutions to Old Problems, (3) Automated Scientific Discovery, (4) Biologically Inspired Cognitive Architectures, (5) Education Informatics: Steps toward the International Internet Classroom, (6) Multimedia Information Extraction, and (7) Naturally Inspired AI.    


If Not Turing's Test, Then What?

AI Magazine

If it is true that good problems produce good science, then it will be worthwhile to identify good problems, and even more worthwhile to discover the attributes that make them good problems. This discovery process is necessarily empirical, so we examine several challenge problems, beginning with Turing's famous test, and more than a dozen attributes that challenge problems might have. We are led to a contrast between research strategies -- the successful "divide and conquer" strategy and the promising but largely untested "developmental" strategy -- and we conclude that good challenge problems encourage the latter strategy.


If Not Turing's Test, Then What?

AI Magazine

If it is true that good problems produce good science, then it will be worthwhile to identify good problems, and even more worthwhile to discover the attributes that make them good problems. This discovery process is necessarily empirical, so we examine several challenge problems, beginning with Turing's famous test, and more than a dozen attributes that challenge problems might have. We are led to a contrast between research strategies -- the successful "divide and conquer" strategy and the promising but largely untested "developmental" strategy -- and we conclude that good challenge problems encourage the latter strategy.


AAAI 2001 Spring Symposium Series Reports

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, presented the 2001 Spring Symposium Series on Monday through Wednesday, 26 to 28 March 2001, at Stanford University. The titles of the seven symposia were (1) Answer Set Programming: Toward Efficient and Scalable Knowledge, Representation and Reasoning, (2) Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Entertainment, (3) Game-Theoretic and Decision-Theoretic Agents, (4) Learning Grounded Representations, (5) Model-Based Validation of Intelligence, (6) Robotics and Education, and (7) Robust Autonomy.


AAAI 2001 Spring Symposium Series Reports

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, presented the 2001 Spring Symposium Series on Monday through Wednesday, 26 to 28 March 2001, at Stanford University. The titles of the seven symposia were (1) Answer Set Programming: Toward Efficient and Scalable Knowledge, Representation and Reasoning, (2) Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Entertainment, (3) Game-Theoretic and Decision-Theoretic Agents, (4) Learning Grounded Representations, (5) Model-Based Validation of Intelligence, (6) Robotics and Education, and (7) Robust Autonomy.


The DARPA High-Performance Knowledge Bases Project

AI Magazine

Now completing its first year, the High-Performance Knowledge Bases Project promotes technology for developing very large, flexible, and reusable knowledge bases. The project is supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and includes more than 15 contractors in universities, research laboratories, and companies.


The DARPA High-Performance Knowledge Bases Project

AI Magazine

Now completing its first year, the High-Performance Knowledge Bases Project promotes technology for developing very large, flexible, and reusable knowledge bases. The project is supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and includes more than 15 contractors in universities, research laboratories, and companies. The evaluation of the constituent technologies centers on two challenge problems, in crisis management and battlespace reasoning, each demanding powerful problem solving with very large knowledge bases. This article discusses the challenge problems, the constituent technologies, and their integration and evaluation.