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Collaborating Authors

Casper, Jennifer


The 2004 Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

The thirteenth AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition was once again collocated with AAAI-2204, in San Jose, California. As in previous years, the robot events drew competitors from both academia and industry to showcase state-ofthe- art mobile robot software and systems in four organized events.


The 2004 Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

Running services in many small processes improves fault tolerance since any number of services can fail due to programming faults without affecting the rest of the system. While it is clearly important to be able to handle a wide range of failures, application authors should not be required to implement routines to test and react in every known mode of failure for every application, even if the failures are abstracted to a common interface. Thus, the framework also provides transparent fault-tolerance to users of system services. Errors in software and hardware are detected, and corrective action is taken. Services can be restarted or removed from the system, and clients are reconnected to the same service or to another service implementing the same interface without intervention from the application programmer. The Washington University team successfully demonstrated its failure-tolerant framework on its robot, Lewis (figure 6).


2003 AAAI Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

The Twelfth Annual Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) Robot Competition and Exhibition was held in Acapulco, Mexico, in conjunction with the Eighteenth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence. The events included the Robot Host and Urban Search and Rescue competitions, the AAAI Robot Challenge, and the Robot Exhibition. In the Urban Search and Rescue competition, teams attempted to find victims in a simulated disaster area using teleoperated, semiautonomous, and autonomous robots. The AAAI Robot Challenge is a noncompetitive event where the robots attempt to attend the conference by locating the registration booth, registering for the conference, and then giving a talk to an audience.


2003 AAAI Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

The Twelfth Annual Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) Robot Competition and Exhibition was held in Acapulco, Mexico, in conjunction with the Eighteenth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence. The events included the Robot Host and Urban Search and Rescue competitions, the AAAI Robot Challenge, and the Robot Exhibition. In the Robot Host event, the robots had to act as mobile information servers and guides to the exhibit area of the conference. In the Urban Search and Rescue competition, teams attempted to find victims in a simulated disaster area using teleoperated, semiautonomous, and autonomous robots. The AAAI Robot Challenge is a noncompetitive event where the robots attempt to attend the conference by locating the registration booth, registering for the conference, and then giving a talk to an audience. Finally, the Robot Exhibition is an opportunity for robotics researchers to demonstrate their robots' capabilities to conference attendees. The three days of events were capped by the two Robot Challenge participants giving talks and answering questions from the audience.


AAAI/RoboCup-2001 Urban Search and Rescue Events

AI Magazine

The RoboCup Rescue Physical Agent League Competition was held in the summer of 2001 in conjunction with the AAAI Mobile Robot Competition Urban Search and Rescue event, eerily preceding the September 11 World Trade Center (WTC) disaster. Four teams responded to the WTC disaster through the auspices of the Center for Robot-Assisted Search and Rescue (CRASAR), directed by John Blitch. Blitch, through his position as program manager for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Tactical Mobile Robots Program, was a supporter of the competition; he also served as a member of the rules committee and a judge. USF participated by chairing the rules committee, judging, assisting with the logistics, providing commentary, and demonstrating tethered and wireless robots whenever entrants had to skip around during the competition.


AAAI/RoboCup-2001 Robot Rescue

AI Magazine

The AAAI/RoboCup Robot Rescue event is designed to push researchers to design robotic systems for urban search and rescue. The rules were written to approximate a real rescue situation in a simulated environment constructed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.


AAAI/RoboCup-2001 Urban Search and Rescue Events

AI Magazine

The RoboCup Rescue Physical Agent League Competition was held in the summer of 2001 in conjunction with the AAAI Mobile Robot Competition Urban Search and Rescue event, eerily preceding the September 11 World Trade Center (WTC) disaster. Four teams responded to the WTC disaster through the auspices of the Center for Robot-Assisted Search and Rescue (CRASAR), directed by John Blitch. The four teams were Foster- Miller and iRobot (both robot manufacturers from the Boston area), the United States Navy's Space Warfare Center (SPAWAR) group from San Diego, and the University of South Florida (USF). Blitch, through his position as program manager for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Tactical Mobile Robots Program, was a supporter of the competition; he also served as a member of the rules committee and a judge. USF participated by chairing the rules committee, judging, assisting with the logistics, providing commentary, and demonstrating tethered and wireless robots whenever entrants had to skip around during the competition. Based on our experiences and history, we were asked to comment on the validity of the competition. The CRASAR collective experience suggests that most of the basic rules of the competition matched reality because the rules accurately reflected deployment scenarios, but the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Standard Test Course, and hardware or software approaches forwarded by competitors in last summer's event, missed the mark. This article briefly reviews the types of robots and missions used by CRASAR at the WTC site, then discusses the robotassisted search and rescue effort in terms of lessons for the competition.


AAAI/RoboCup-2001 Robot Rescue

AI Magazine

The search and rescue efforts involving structural joint rules committee from RoboCup and collapse and other urban environments (Fire AAAI brought two communities together to 1993). The main task of USAR is to recover live develop the rules and scoring method. Robots involved with USAR must were four registered teams in the competition: identify victims and send back the locations to (1) Sharif University, (2) Swarthmore College, trained medical rescue personnel for removal (3) Utah State University, and (4) the University of the victims from the collapsed area. Additionally, several teams Robot Rescue League rules, designed by the exhibited their robots in the rescue arena, rules committee, keep the USAR task in focus including the University of South Florida and by addressing several issues that arise in real the University of Minnesota. This article discusses USAR situations, such as the time to transport the 2001 Robot Rescue event: the and set up the robot; the number of personnel course, the rules, the research approaches of required to run the robot; and, most importantly, the participants, and the final scores.