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Bansal, Mohit


Finding a Balanced Degree of Automation for Summary Evaluation

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Human evaluation for summarization tasks is reliable but brings in issues of reproducibility and high costs. Automatic metrics are cheap and reproducible but sometimes poorly correlated with human judgment. In this work, we propose flexible semiautomatic to automatic summary evaluation metrics, following the Pyramid human evaluation method. Semi-automatic Lite2Pyramid retains the reusable human-labeled Summary Content Units (SCUs) for reference(s) but replaces the manual work of judging SCUs' presence in system summaries with a natural language inference (NLI) model. Fully automatic Lite3Pyramid further substitutes SCUs with automatically extracted Semantic Triplet Units (STUs) via a semantic role labeling (SRL) model. Finally, we propose in-between metrics, Lite2.xPyramid, where we use a simple regressor to predict how well the STUs can simulate SCUs and retain SCUs that are more difficult to simulate, which provides a smooth transition and balance between automation and manual evaluation. Comparing to 15 existing metrics, we evaluate human-metric correlations on 3 existing meta-evaluation datasets and our newly-collected PyrXSum (with 100/10 XSum examples/systems). It shows that Lite2Pyramid consistently has the best summary-level correlations; Lite3Pyramid works better than or comparable to other automatic metrics; Lite2.xPyramid trades off small correlation drops for larger manual effort reduction, which can reduce costs for future data collection. Our code and data are publicly available at: https://github.com/ZhangShiyue/Lite2-3Pyramid


ChrEnTranslate: Cherokee-English Machine Translation Demo with Quality Estimation and Corrective Feedback

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

We introduce ChrEnTranslate, an online machine translation demonstration system for translation between English and an endangered language Cherokee. It supports both statistical and neural translation models as well as provides quality estimation to inform users of reliability, two user feedback interfaces for experts and common users respectively, example inputs to collect human translations for monolingual data, word alignment visualization, and relevant terms from the Cherokee-English dictionary. The quantitative evaluation demonstrates that our backbone translation models achieve state-of-the-art translation performance and our quality estimation well correlates with both BLEU and human judgment. By analyzing 216 pieces of expert feedback, we find that NMT is preferable because it copies less than SMT, and, in general, current models can translate fragments of the source sentence but make major mistakes. When we add these 216 expert-corrected parallel texts back into the training set and retrain models, equal or slightly better performance is observed, which indicates the potential of human-in-the-loop learning. Our online demo is at https://chren.cs.unc.edu/ , our code is open-sourced at https://github.com/ZhangShiyue/ChrEnTranslate , and our data is available at https://github.com/ZhangShiyue/ChrEn


EmailSum: Abstractive Email Thread Summarization

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Recent years have brought about an interest in the challenging task of summarizing conversation threads (meetings, online discussions, etc.). Such summaries help analysis of the long text to quickly catch up with the decisions made and thus improve our work or communication efficiency. To spur research in thread summarization, we have developed an abstractive Email Thread Summarization (EmailSum) dataset, which contains human-annotated short (<30 words) and long (<100 words) summaries of 2549 email threads (each containing 3 to 10 emails) over a wide variety of topics. We perform a comprehensive empirical study to explore different summarization techniques (including extractive and abstractive methods, single-document and hierarchical models, as well as transfer and semisupervised learning) and conduct human evaluations on both short and long summary generation tasks. Our results reveal the key challenges of current abstractive summarization models in this task, such as understanding the sender's intent and identifying the roles of sender and receiver. Furthermore, we find that widely used automatic evaluation metrics (ROUGE, BERTScore) are weakly correlated with human judgments on this email thread summarization task. Hence, we emphasize the importance of human evaluation and the development of better metrics by the community. Our code and summary data have been made available at: https://github.com/ZhangShiyue/EmailSum


MTVR: Multilingual Moment Retrieval in Videos

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

We introduce mTVR, a large-scale multilingual video moment retrieval dataset, containing 218K English and Chinese queries from 21.8K TV show video clips. The dataset is collected by extending the popular TVR dataset (in English) with paired Chinese queries and subtitles. Compared to existing moment retrieval datasets, mTVR is multilingual, larger, and comes with diverse annotations. We further propose mXML, a multilingual moment retrieval model that learns and operates on data from both languages, via encoder parameter sharing and language neighborhood constraints. We demonstrate the effectiveness of mXML on the newly collected MTVR dataset, where mXML outperforms strong monolingual baselines while using fewer parameters. In addition, we also provide detailed dataset analyses and model ablations. Data and code are publicly available at https://github.com/jayleicn/mTVRetrieval


QVHighlights: Detecting Moments and Highlights in Videos via Natural Language Queries

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Detecting customized moments and highlights from videos given natural language (NL) user queries is an important but under-studied topic. One of the challenges in pursuing this direction is the lack of annotated data. To address this issue, we present the Query-based Video Highlights (QVHighlights) dataset. It consists of over 10,000 YouTube videos, covering a wide range of topics, from everyday activities and travel in lifestyle vlog videos to social and political activities in news videos. Each video in the dataset is annotated with: (1) a human-written free-form NL query, (2) relevant moments in the video w.r.t. the query, and (3) five-point scale saliency scores for all query-relevant clips. This comprehensive annotation enables us to develop and evaluate systems that detect relevant moments as well as salient highlights for diverse, flexible user queries. We also present a strong baseline for this task, Moment-DETR, a transformer encoder-decoder model that views moment retrieval as a direct set prediction problem, taking extracted video and query representations as inputs and predicting moment coordinates and saliency scores end-to-end. While our model does not utilize any human prior, we show that it performs competitively when compared to well-engineered architectures. With weakly supervised pretraining using ASR captions, Moment-DETR substantially outperforms previous methods. Lastly, we present several ablations and visualizations of Moment-DETR. Data and code is publicly available at https://github.com/jayleicn/moment_detr


How Much Can CLIP Benefit Vision-and-Language Tasks?

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Most existing Vision-and-Language (V&L) models rely on pre-trained visual encoders, using a relatively small set of manually-annotated data (as compared to web-crawled data), to perceive the visual world. However, it has been observed that large-scale pretraining usually can result in better generalization performance, e.g., CLIP (Contrastive Language-Image Pre-training), trained on a massive amount of image-caption pairs, has shown a strong zero-shot capability on various vision tasks. To further study the advantage brought by CLIP, we propose to use CLIP as the visual encoder in various V&L models in two typical scenarios: 1) plugging CLIP into task-specific fine-tuning; 2) combining CLIP with V&L pre-training and transferring to downstream tasks. We show that CLIP significantly outperforms widely-used visual encoders trained with in-domain annotated data, such as BottomUp-TopDown. We achieve competitive or better results on diverse V&L tasks, while establishing new state-of-the-art results on Visual Question Answering, Visual Entailment, and V&L Navigation tasks. We release our code at https://github.com/clip-vil/CLIP-ViL.


VidLanKD: Improving Language Understanding via Video-Distilled Knowledge Transfer

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Since visual perception can give rich information beyond text descriptions for world understanding, there has been increasing interest in leveraging visual grounding for language learning. Recently, vokenization has attracted attention by using the predictions of a text-to-image retrieval model as labels for language model supervision. Despite its success, the method suffers from approximation error of using finite image labels and the lack of vocabulary diversity of a small image-text dataset. To overcome these limitations, we present VidLanKD, a video-language knowledge distillation method for improving language understanding. We train a multi-modal teacher model on a video-text dataset, and then transfer its knowledge to a student language model with a text dataset. To avoid approximation error, we propose to use different knowledge distillation objectives. In addition, the use of a large-scale video-text dataset helps learn diverse and richer vocabularies. In our experiments, VidLanKD achieves consistent improvements over text-only language models and vokenization models, on several downstream language understanding tasks including GLUE, SQuAD, and SWAG. We also demonstrate the improved world knowledge, physical reasoning, and temporal reasoning capabilities of our model by evaluating on the GLUE-diagnostics, PIQA, and TRACIE datasets. Lastly, we present comprehensive ablation studies as well as visualizations of the learned text-to-video grounding results of our teacher and student language models. Our code and models are available at: https://github.com/zinengtang/VidLanKD


VIMPAC: Video Pre-Training via Masked Token Prediction and Contrastive Learning

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Video understanding relies on perceiving the global content and modeling its internal connections (e.g., causality, movement, and spatio-temporal correspondence). To learn these interactions, we apply a mask-then-predict pre-training task on discretized video tokens generated via VQ-VAE. Unlike language, where the text tokens are more independent, neighboring video tokens typically have strong correlations (e.g., consecutive video frames usually look very similar), and hence uniformly masking individual tokens will make the task too trivial to learn useful representations. To deal with this issue, we propose a block-wise masking strategy where we mask neighboring video tokens in both spatial and temporal domains. We also add an augmentation-free contrastive learning method to further capture the global content by predicting whether the video clips are sampled from the same video. We pre-train our model on uncurated videos and show that our pre-trained model can reach state-of-the-art results on several video understanding datasets (e.g., SSV2, Diving48). Lastly, we provide detailed analyses on model scalability and pre-training method design.


An Empirical Survey of Data Augmentation for Limited Data Learning in NLP

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

NLP has achieved great progress in the past decade through the use of neural models and large labeled datasets. The dependence on abundant data prevents NLP models from being applied to low-resource settings or novel tasks where significant time, money, or expertise is required to label massive amounts of textual data. Recently, data augmentation methods have been explored as a means of improving data efficiency in NLP. To date, there has been no systematic empirical overview of data augmentation for NLP in the limited labeled data setting, making it difficult to understand which methods work in which settings. In this paper, we provide an empirical survey of recent progress on data augmentation for NLP in the limited labeled data setting, summarizing the landscape of methods (including token-level augmentations, sentence-level augmentations, adversarial augmentations, and hidden-space augmentations) and carrying out experiments on 11 datasets covering topics/news classification, inference tasks, paraphrasing tasks, and single-sentence tasks. Based on the results, we draw several conclusions to help practitioners choose appropriate augmentations in different settings and discuss the current challenges and future directions for limited data learning in NLP.


Enriching Transformers with Structured Tensor-Product Representations for Abstractive Summarization

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Abstractive summarization, the task of generating a concise summary of input documents, requires: (1) reasoning over the source document to determine the salient pieces of information scattered across the long document, and (2) composing a cohesive text by reconstructing these salient facts into a shorter summary that faithfully reflects the complex relations connecting these facts. In this paper, we adapt TP-TRANSFORMER (Schlag et al., 2019), an architecture that enriches the original Transformer (Vaswani et al., 2017) with the explicitly compositional Tensor Product Representation (TPR), for the task of abstractive summarization. The key feature of our model is a structural bias that we introduce by encoding two separate representations for each token to represent the syntactic structure (with role vectors) and semantic content (with filler vectors) separately. The model then binds the role and filler vectors into the TPR as the layer output. We argue that the structured intermediate representations enable the model to take better control of the contents (salient facts) and structures (the syntax that connects the facts) when generating the summary. Empirically, we show that our TP-TRANSFORMER outperforms the Transformer and the original TP-TRANSFORMER significantly on several abstractive summarization datasets based on both automatic and human evaluations. On several syntactic and semantic probing tasks, we demonstrate the emergent structural information in the role vectors and improved syntactic interpretability in the TPR layer outputs. Code and models are available at https://github.com/jiangycTarheel/TPT-Summ.