Atkinson, Katie



Fifteenth International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law (ICAIL 2015)

AI Magazine

The 15th International Conference on AI and Law (ICAIL 2015) will be held in San Diego, California, USA, June 8-12, 2015, at the University of San Diego, at the Kroc Institute, under the auspices of the International Association for Artificial Intelligence and Law (IAAIL), an organization devoted to promoting research and development in the field of AI and law with members throughout the world. The conference is held in cooperation with the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) and with ACM SIGAI (the Special Interest Group on Artificial Intelligence of the Association for Computing Machinery).


Fifteenth International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law (ICAIL 2015)

AI Magazine

The 15th International Conference on AI and Law (ICAIL 2015) will be held in San Diego, California, USA, June 8-12, 2015, at the University of San Diego, at the Kroc Institute, under the auspices of the International Association for Artificial Intelligence and Law (IAAIL), an organization devoted to promoting research and development in the field of AI and law with members throughout the world. The conference is held in cooperation with the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) and with ACM SIGAI (the Special Interest Group on Artificial Intelligence of the Association for Computing Machinery).


Distributing Coalition Value Calculations to Coalition Members

AAAI Conferences

Within characteristic function games, agents have the option of joining one of many different coalitions, based on the utility value of each candidate coalition. However, determining this utility value can be computationally complex since the number of coalitions increases exponentially with the number of agents available. Various approaches have been proposed that mediate this problem by distributing the computational load so that each agent calculates only a subset of coalition values. However, current approaches are either highly inefficient due to redundant calculations, or make the benevolence assumption (i.e. are not suitable for adversarial environments). We introduce DCG, a novel algorithm that distributes the calculations of coalition utility values across a community of agents, such that: (i) no inter-agent communication is required; (ii) the coalition value calculations are (approximately) equally partitioned into shares, one for each agent; (iii) the utility value is calculated only once for each coalition, thus redundant calculations are eliminated; (iv) there is an equal number of operations for agents with equal sized shares; and (v) an agent is only allocated those coalitions in which it is a potential member. The DCG algorithm is presented and illustrated by means of an example. We formally prove that our approach allocates all of the coalitions to the agents, and that each coalition is assigned once and only once.


Model Checking Command Dialogues

AAAI Conferences

Verification that agent communication protocols have desirable properties or do not have undesirable properties is an important issue in agent systems where agents intend to communicate using such protocols. In this paper we explore the use of model checkers to verify properties of agent communication protocols, with these properties expressed as formulae in temporal logic.  We illustrate our approach using a recently-proposed protocol for agent dialogues over commands, a protocol that permits the agents to present questions, challenges and arguments for or against compliance with a command.


Action-State Semantics for Practical Reasoning

AAAI Conferences

There are two aspects of practical reasoning which present particular difficulties for current approaches to modelling practical reasoning through argumentation: temporal aspects, and the intrinsic worth of actions. Time is important because actions change the state of the world, we need to consider future states as well as past and present ones. Equally, it is often not what we do but the way that we do it that matters: the same future state may be reachable either through desirable or undesirable actions, and often also actions are done for their own sake rather than for the sake of their consequences. In this paper we will present a semantics for practical reasoning, based on a formalisation developed originally for reasoning about commands, in which actions and states are treated as of equal status. We will show how using these semantics facilitates the handling of the temporal aspects of practical reasoning, and enables, where appropriate, justification of actions without reference to their consequences.