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Agrobotics startup Root AI acquired by AppHarvest for $60M

#artificialintelligence

Root AI, a Somerville, Mass.-based startup developing the Virgo harvesting robot for indoor farms, was acquired by AppHarvest for $60 million. AppHarvest is investing approximately $10 million in cash and the remaining balance in AppHarvest common shares to acquire Root AI. Founded in 2018, Root AI's 19 full-time employees are expected to join AppHarvest's technology group. Root AI co-founder and CEO Josh Lessing will take on the role of CTO for AppHarvest. He will take the lead in continuing to develop the robots and AI capabilities for the network of indoor farms AppHarvest is building.


Robots threaten jobs less than fearmongers claim

#artificialintelligence

THE COFFEESHOP is an engine of social mobility. Barista jobs require soft skills and little experience, making them a first port of call for young people and immigrants looking for work. So it may be worrying that robotic baristas are spreading. RC Coffee, which bills itself "Canada's first robotic café", opened in Toronto last summer. "[T]he barista-to-customer interaction is somewhat risky despite people's best efforts to maintain a safe environment," the firm says.


Evolving AI in health care with Holographic Telepresence

#artificialintelligence

AI in health care sector has evolved leaps and bounds. However, there are certain sensitive areas or domains within it, where the magic touch of AI is yet to be felt. Such a domain is that of emergency health care domains like trauma care centres. Apparently, trauma care centres are the most visited because of the rate of accidents that occur daily. May it be motorbike accidents or gunshot wounds, the victims are straight sent to trauma care hospitals every day.


AI in E-Learning Industry and its Predictions to Watch out for in 2021

#artificialintelligence

With COVID-19 taking hold over the world, it compelled associations worldwide to reevaluate how they conduct business, train, and prepare their employees to address the disruption and business elements' difficulties. How are associations preparing for the coming year in reskilling and upskilling their employees? The pandemic has made unprecedented difficulties that have constrained organizations to search for alternative work types like work from home or remote working and carry virtual training to the front. Prior virtual training was utilized uniquely for the remote workforce or individuals spread across geographies. Working from home is the new normal at this point.


Elon Musk's brain-implant lab claims this poor monkey's playing 'Pong' with its mind

Mashable

Elon Musk's brain-implant lab, Neuralink, today released video appearing to show something the tech billionaire has been bragging about since 2019: a monkey playing a video game ... with its mind. In the video (and an accompanying one of the Neuralink signal readout, if you're into that), a rhesus macaque named Pager is shown playing simple games on a screen while sucking on a straw that's delivering a tasty banana smoothie as a reward. Pager, at first, uses a joystick to move a dot around a grid, placing it onto squares that light up one by one at random. In the next sequence, he's still using the joystick -- but as the gently British-accented narrator points out, the joystick apparatus is quite clearly unplugged. The implant, we're told, is transmitting data from the electrical signals his brain emits as he plays.


LLNL Virtual Seminar Series Explores Data-Driven Physical Simulations

#artificialintelligence

The rapidly growing fields of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) have become cornerstones of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) data science research activities. The Lab's scientific community regularly publishes advancements in both AI/ML applications and theory, contributing to international discourse on the possibilities of these compelling technologies. The large volume of AI/ML scientific literature can be overwhelming, so researchers sometimes organize reading groups where one person reads a paper and presents the methods and results to colleagues. For instance, the Lab has active reading groups studying ML and reinforcement learning. The Data-Driven Physical Simulation (DDPS) reading group has been meeting biweekly since October 2019.


Machine Learning, AI, Carving Out Niches in Clinical Lab Management

#artificialintelligence

While clinical labs' use of machine learning and artificial intelligence is perhaps most prominently associated with areas like pathology and microbiology testing, these tools are also seeing uptake for lab management applications like specimen routing and billing support. These kinds of logistical applications have proved particularly relevant during the COVID-19 pandemic, helping laboratories handle dramatic increases in testing demand, but investments in this technology has at some labs long pre-dated SARS-CoV-2.


Neuralink's brain-computer interface demo shows a monkey playing Pong

Engadget

Elon Musk's last update on Neuralink -- his company that is working on technology that will connect the human brain directly to a computer -- featured a pig with one of its chips implanted in its brain. Now Neuralink is demonstrating its progress by showing a Macaque with one of the Link chips playing Pong. At first using "Pager" is shown using a joystick, and then eventually, according to the narration, using only its mind via the wireless connection. Monkey plays Pong with his mind https://t.co/35NIFm4C7T Today we are pleased to reveal the Link's capability to enable a macaque monkey, named Pager, to move a cursor on a computer screen with neural activity using a 1,024 electrode fully-implanted neural recording and data transmission device, termed the N1 Link.


Algorithms similar to what Netflix and Facebook use can 'predict' the biological language of cancer

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Algorithms similar to those used by Netflix, Amazon and Facebook have shown the ability to decipher the'biological language' of cancer, Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. Researchers trained a large-scale language model with a recommendation AI to look at what happens when something goes wrong with proteins that leads to the development of a disease. The work, conducted by St. John's College and the University of Cambridge, programed the algorithm to learn the language of shapeshifting droplets of proteins found in cells in order to understand their function and malfunction. By learning these protein droplets' language, the team can then'correct the grammatical mistakes inside cells that cause disease.'' Professor Tuomas Knowles, a Fellow at St John's College, said: 'Any defects connected with these protein droplets can lead to diseases such as cancer. 'This is why bringing natural language processing technology into research into the molecular origins of protein malfunction is vital if we want to be able to correct the grammatical mistakes inside cells that cause disease.' Machine learning technology has made waves in the tech industry – Netflix uses it to recommend series, Facebook's suggest someone to friend and Amazon's Alexa has an algorithm to recognize people based on their voice.


Artificial Intelligence could 'crack the language of cancer and Alzheimer's'

#artificialintelligence

Powerful algorithms used by Netflix, Amazon and Facebook can'predict' the biological language of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, scientists have found. Big data produced during decades of research was fed into a computer language model to see if artificial intelligence can make more advanced discoveries than humans. Academics based at St John's College, University of Cambridge, found the machine-learning technology could decipher the'biological language' of cancer, Alzheimer's, and other neurodegenerative diseases. Their ground-breaking study has been published in the scientific journal PNAS today and could be used in the future to'correct the grammatical mistakes inside cells that cause disease'. Professor Tuomas Knowles, lead author of the paper and a Fellow at St John's College, said: "Bringing machine-learning technology into research into neurodegenerative diseases and cancer is an absolute game-changer. Ultimately, the aim will be to use artificial intelligence to develop targeted drugs to dramatically ease symptoms or to prevent dementia happening at all."