Regional Government


Rensselaer focuses IBM's AiMOS supercomputer on machine learning

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Sophisticated machine learning applications require not only enormous amounts of training data, but powerful computer hardware on which to train. An analysis conducted by San Francisco research firm OpenAI found that since 2012, the amount of compute used in the largest training runs has been increasing exponentially with a 3.4-month doubling time, and that it's grown by more than 300,000 times over that same time period. The trend spurred the development of supercomputers like the U.S. Department of Energy's Sierra and Summit, which leverage dedicated accelerator chips to speed up AI computation. Now, IBM's Hardware Center, in collaboration with New York State, SUNY Polytechnic Institute, and other members of IBM's AI Hardware Center, has delivered a new machine for the Department of Computer Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) that's optimized for state-of-the-art machine learning workloads. It's dubbed Artificial Intelligence Multiprocessing Optimized System, or AiMOS (in honor of Rensselaer cofounder Amos Eaton), and it will principally tackle projects in biology, chemistry, the humanities, and related domains underway at the new IBM Research AI Hardware Center on the SUNY campus in Albany.


Considering AI In Hiring? As Its Use Grows, So Do The Legal Implications For Employers.

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Employers engage artificial intelligence solutions amid a talent shortage. As employers grapple with a widespread labor shortage, more are turning to artificial intelligence tools in their search for qualified candidates. Hiring managers are using increasingly sophisticated AI solutions to streamline large parts of the hiring process. The tools scrape online job boards and evaluate applications to identify the best fits. They can even stage entire online interviews and scan everything from word choice to facial expressions before recommending the most qualified prospects.


Robots Aim to Boost Astronaut Efficiency

Communications of the ACM

ESA's SpaceBok robot is designed to walk, hop, and run in low-gravity environments. From free-flying droids to humanoids, from crawlers to inflatable torsos, space robots of myriad types are now being considered for missions in low Earth orbit, on interplanetary spacecraft, and on other worlds. It might sound like a prop list from a Star Wars movie, but space agencies and their contractors are developing a panoply of robotic assistants with a serious aim in mind: to boost the productivity and safety of astronauts. The idea behind robot assistants is multifaceted: one aim is to offload time-consuming repetitive tasks like space station cleaning and inventory making from crew members to free-flying or humanoid robots. Ground robots controlled from, say, spacecraft orbiting the Moon or Mars could construct human habitats ahead of a landing, or perform reconnaissance ahead of human exploration missions.


A Hands-Free Ride

Communications of the ACM

I recently had the opportunity to take a ride in a Waymo self-driving car in Chandler, AZ. I had been looking forward to this experience, not only to see how well the technology worked but also what the experience might be like as a passenger. Upon my arrival at the Waymo facility, I had apparently approached the side of the building where the Waymo cars go at the end of their duty cycles to be refueled and inspected. As I drove in, I was more or less surrounded by incoming Waymo vehicles. I relaxed as they navigated their way around me.


Artificial Intelligence is heralding a new dawn in the way we diagnose, treat and manage disease - FutureScot

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Lord Drayson seems a man on the move. As an amateur racing driver, it is perhaps an innate charateristic, and in the current debate around health data his foot is very much on the gas. I meet the former Labour government science and defence minister shortly after he lays out a bold new vision for the NHS at FutureScot's recent Digital Health & Care conference in Glasgow. Urbane and well-connected, Drayson is also a keen student of policy and how the arguments around big tech and health data are shaping up. For background, there is an intensifying argument that the NHS needs to make much more use of a still largely untapped goldmine of data, which could herald a new dawn in the way we diagnose, treat and manage disease – not to mention save billions of pounds annually.


Artificial intelligence improve military power -Industry Global News24

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Artificial intelligence and AI are transformative advancements that level many playing fields, such a large number of in reality that a small country can militarily contend with extraordinary military power, similar to the US. The Chinese have an open, exceptionally profound, amazingly well-subsidized pledge to AI. Aviation based armed forces General VeraLinn Jamieson says it evidently: "We gauge the complete spending on artificial intelligence frameworks in China in 2017 was $12 billion. We likewise gauge that it will develop to at any rate $70 billion by 2020." Andrew Yang, during a Democratic Candidates banter, expressed that the US is losing the AI weapons contest to China. Barely a year back, I contended something very similar.


Artificial intelligence helps spot wildfires faster

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As wildfire season raged in California this fall, a startup a few states away used artificial intelligence to pinpoint the location of blazes there within minutes -- in some cases far faster than these fires might otherwise be noticed by firefighters or civilians. Santa Fe-based Descartes Labs, which uses AI to analyze satellite imagery, launched its U.S. wildfire detector in July. The company's AI software pores over images coming in roughly every few minutes from two different U.S. government weather satellites, in search of any changes -- the presence of smoke, a shift in thermal infrared data showing hot spots -- that could indicate a fire has ignited. Descartes is testing its detector by sending alerts to select forestry officials in its home state of New Mexico and told CNN Business its wildfire detector has spotted about 6,200 total thus far. The company says it can often detect these fires when they're just about 10 acres in size.


New Zealand Global Information Society Watch

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Algorithms and social media: A need for regulations to control harmful content? On 15 March 2019, a white supremacist committed a terrorist attack on two mosques in Christchurch, murdering 51 people as they were peacefully worshipping, injuring many others and live streaming the attack on Facebook. The attack was the worst of its kind in New Zealand's history and prompted an emotional nationwide outpouring of solidarity with Muslim communities. Our prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, moved quickly, travelling immediately to the Muslim communities affected, framing the attack as one on all New Zealanders, vowing compassion, refusing to ever say the name of the attacker, issuing a pledge to ban semi-automatic weapons of the kind used in the attack, and steering her people through a difficult emotional time of grief, anger and shock. The global response led Ardern and French President Emmanuel Macron to issue the #Christchurch Call,[1] calling for, among other things, an examination of the use of algorithms by social media platforms to identify and interfere with terrorist extremist online content. This country report critically examines the events, including discussion of technical measures to find and moderate the objectionable content.


NASA captures incredible close-up shot of plumes of dust leaving an asteroid

Daily Mail - Science & tech

NASA has captured an incredible close-up shot of plumes of dust and rocks erupting from the surface of near-Earth asteroid Bennu as it spins through the solar system. Researchers from the University of Arizona have been studying the images taken by the navigation camera on the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft. The high-resolution images were taken as part of a NASA mission to bring samples of the asteroid - that is about 300,000miles away - back to Earth for scientists to study. These images offer a detailed look at small-scale rock and particle loss from an active asteroid for the first time, say researchers. Previous studies have been limited to only the largest ejections seen from Earth.


SpaceX successfully launches Dragon for its 19th mission to the ISS carrying a 5,700-pound payload

Daily Mail - Science & tech

SpaceX successfully launched the'Dragon' capsule on top of its Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida for its 19th commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station. The craft took off at 12:29 PM Thursday carrying a 5,700-pound payload that includes genetically-edited'mighty-mice' and Budweiser barley seeds. The Dragon safely deployed from the rocket and is coasting towards the International Space Station– it will reach the craft in three days and spend a total of 30 before returning to Earth with other research and cargo. The mission had been scheduled to launch yesterday, but rough winds detected in the upper atmosphere forced a one-day delay for safety reasons. However, it was a beautiful day in Cape Canaveral with low wind speeds, allowing SpaceX to give the launch another go.