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policy.ai – CSET

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More: Emotion Detection AI Is a $20 Billion Industry. New Research Says It Can't Do What It Claims China's Algorithms of Repression More: Emotion Detection AI Is a $20 Billion Industry. New Research Says It Can't Do What It Claims China's Algorithms of Repression


Singapore has a national AI strategy that will 'transform' the country by 2030 - here are the 5 major plans underway, Business Insider - Business Insider Singapore

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) is increasingly changing the lives of everyday Singaporeans. In the latest Smart Nation development, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Finance Heng Swee Keat announced on Wednesday (Nov 13) that the nation will embark on a "national AI strategy" that plans out ways it will develop and use AI technology. The plan will consist of five "National AI" projects as a start. These will be employed in the sectors of logistics, healthcare, border security, estate management and education management. These sectors were chosen as they have high social and economic impacts, said the Smart Nation and Digital Government Office (SNDGO) in a statement.


AI has a bias problem. Barring African experts from a conference in Canada won't help

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London (CNN Business)Some of the leading artificial intelligence experts from Africa and South America have been denied visas to attend a major industry conference in Canada, dealing a setback to efforts to prevent bias from taking root in the new technology. Conference organizers say Canadian immigration authorities have denied visas to two dozen academics from countries such as Nigeria and Brazil, preventing them from attending the event next month in Vancouver. Katherine Heller, a professor who serves as co-chair of diversity and inclusion at the Neural Information Processing Systems conference, said organizers "are trying extremely hard" to have the visa denials overturned. "It is very significant for the field of AI that all voices be heard," she said. The problem of algorithmic bias in data science has become more pronounced, and there's mounting evidence that AI-powered algorithms display bias against women and some racial groups.


Amazon adds new features to Rekognition software amid ongoing debate over facial recognition tech

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Amazon is rolling out new features that make it easier for customers to search for specific items in large databases of images and videos. The tech giant said Monday it will make "Custom Labels" available next month, allowing Rekognition users without any machine learning experience to deploy the software more nimbly. Custom Labels allow customers to train Rekognition to detect specific objects and scenes related to their use case. For example, a retailer who wants to identify all of the black boots in her online inventory could train the software with images of shoes that meet that description, so that it can detect them in a larger library of images. That type of custom sorting previously required machine learning expertise to build a model from scratch, an Amazon spokesperson said.


Canada refuses visas to African AI researchers

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For the second year in a row, Canada has refused visas to dozens of researchers - most of them from Africa - who were hoping to attend an artificial intelligence (AI) conference in Vancouver. The hassles have caused at least one other AI conference to choose a different country for their next event. The Neural Information Processing Systems conference (NeurIPS), which brings together thousands of experts and researchers from all over the world, will be held in Vancouver next month. Last week, NeurIPS began hearing that several attendees had had their visas denied. It was the second year in a row the conference has had visa troubles.


159. AI, VR and a World Without Privacy as We Explore the Cosmos and What it Means to be Human August Bradley of Mind & Machine

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August Bradley (@augustbradley) is a futurist business consultant, founder/host of the Mind & Machine podcast and former COO of the pioneering virtual reality company Kite & Lightning. August's worked with brands including Coke, Xbox, Kia, Gap, J.Crew, Banana Republic, Fisker Automotive, and many more. He is also a Board Member & Director of the AI & Machine Learning Society, Chairman of the Technarte International Conference, technology series moderator for The Los Angeles ... See More World Affairs Council (LAWAC) and head of the Los Angeles Self Driving Car Meetup. In today's episode we discuss: - Why August and I won't let voice assistants in our homes - What happens next with VR and where it is headed - Which technologies worry August most and why - What does privacy look like in a more connected world - Why Facebook and social media are so bad for all of us - How Amazon helps transform healthcare - The reason AI and automation will be net-negative on jobs - What we have to look forward to when it comes to future technologies - The reason space exploration is so important and exciting - What do we do about big tech and regulation - Why August isn't worried about AI consciousness or superintelligence - The reason food science and clean meat is such a promising field to pursue - Why immigration is a stupid topic to focus on when it comes to jobs - Science fiction as a safety net


Canada refuses visas to African AI researchers

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For the second year in a row, Canada has refused visas to dozens of researchers - most of them from Africa - who were hoping to attend an artificial intelligence (AI) conference in Vancouver. The hassles have caused at least one other AI conference to choose a different country for their next event. The Neural Information Processing Systems conference (NeurIPS), which brings together thousands of experts and researchers from all over the world, will be held in Vancouver next month. Last week, NeurIPS began hearing that several attendees had had their visas denied. It was the second year in a row the conference has had visa troubles.


TTH - Tech update on Mobiles, AI, Laptops, Gadgets, Robotics, UAV & More

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Canadian immigration officials deny travel visas to a large number of AI researchers and research students scheduled to attend the NeurIPS and Black in AI workshop, event organizers said. Among the people who have been denied entry is Tẹjúmádé Àfọ njá, co-organizer of the NeurIPS Machine Learning workshop for the developing world. NeurIP Information Processing Systems (NeurIPs) is the world's largest annual international AI conference, according to the AI Index 2018 report. The conference is scheduled to be held from December 8 to 14 in Vancouver, Canada. On Tuesday, Black in AI co-founder and Google AI researcher Timnit Gebru said that 15 of the 44 attendees who planned to join the workshop on December 9 were denied entry.


GitHub: Over 80% of repository contributions come from outside the U.S.

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GitHub's annual Octoverse report is out today. It found that Microsoft's Visual Studio Code or VSCode (19.1K), Azure Docs (14K), and Flutter (13K) were the top open source projects in total contributors on GitHub in the last year, followed by projects like Google's TensorFlow (9.9K), Kubernetes (6.9K), and the React Native framework created by Facebook. The annual report that looks at trends and milestones for the code repository acquired by Microsoft last year also found that repositories with topics like "deep learning," "natural language processing," and "machine learning" grew in popularity over the course of the past year. GitHub is now used by more than 40 million developers worldwide, a statistic it first shared this summer.


The AI Manifesto

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We live in a time of rapid technological change, where nearly every aspect of our lives now relies on devices that compute and connect. The resulting exponential increase in the use of cyber-physical systems has transformed industry, government, and commerce; what's more, the speed of innovation shows no signs of slowing down, particularly as the revolution in artificial intelligence (AI) stands to transform daily life even further through increasingly powerful tools for data analysis, prediction, security, and automation.1 Like past waves of extreme innovation, as this one crests, debate over ethical usage and privacy controls are likely to proliferate. So far, the intersection of AI and society has brought its own unique set of ethical challenges, some of which have been anticipated and discussed for many years, while others are just beginning to come to light. For example, academics and science fiction authors alike have long pondered the ethical implications of hyper-intelligent machines, but it's only recently that we've seen real-world problems start to surface, like social bias in automated decision-making tools, or the ethical choices made by self-driving cars.2, 5 During the past two decades, the security community has increasingly turned to AI and the power of machine learning (ML) to reap many technological benefits, but those advances have forced security practitioners to navigate a proportional number of risks and ethical dilemmas along the way. As the leader in the development of AI and ML for cybersecurity, BlackBerry Cylance is at the heart of the debate and is passionate about advancing the use of AI for good.