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Alcatraz escape mystery may have just been solved with facial-recognition tech

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The 57-year-old mystery of an infamous prison break from Alcatraz may have finally been solved using artificial-intelligence and facial-recognition technology. Rothco, the Irish creative agency owned by Accenture Interactive, teamed up with AI specialists at Identv to analyse a picture of two escapees and have, for the first time, confirmed their identities. On 11 June 1962, three prisoners – Frank Morris, along with brothers John and Clarence Anglin – broke out of their cells and escaped from the prison on Alcatraz Island, near San Francisco Bay. The trio's extraordinary escape, in which they used sharpened spoons to dig through the walls and made papier-mâché dummies to fool the guards, was made famous in the 1979 movie Escape from Alcatraz. The prison, which shut down in 1963, was famed for being supposedly impossible to escape from.


Precision medicine startup Notable starts trial to test AI platform in blood cancer patients - MedCity News

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A technology company uses artificial intelligence to assist in cancer drug development has launched a study that will collect data on up to 1,000 blood cancer patients over the course of a year. San Francisco-based Notable said Wednesday it had launched the study, titled ANSWer, which will collect de-identified specimens with matched clinical data from participants in U.S. and Canadian clinical networks, at the time of their entry into the study and during subsequent visits. Patients with acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, multiple myeloma, lymphomas, myeloproliferative disorders and others will be included. The goal is to establish a tumor registry with annotated clinical outcomes. "The observational clinical trial that we're kicking off will give us the opportunity to test more patients than ever before, allowing us to continue increasing the platform's predictive value," Notable CEO Matt De Silva said in a statement.


It's too late to ban face recognition – here's what we need instead

New Scientist

Calls for an outright ban on face recognition technology are growing louder, but it is already too late. Given its widespread use by tech companies and the police, permanently rolling back the technology is impossible. It was widely reported this week that the European Commission is considering a temporary ban on the use of face recognition in public spaces. The proposed hiatus of up to five years, according to a white paper obtained by news site Politico, would aim to give politicians in Europe time to develop measures to mitigate the potential risks associated with the technology. Several US cities, including San Francisco, are mulling or have enacted similar bans.


AI Can Do Great Things--if It Doesn't Burn the Planet

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Artificial intelligence routinely produces startling achievements, but those advances require staggering amounts of computing power and electricity. Last month, researchers at OpenAI in San Francisco revealed an algorithm capable of learning, through trial and error, how to manipulate the pieces of a Rubik's Cube using a robotic hand. It was a remarkable research feat, but it required more than 1,000 desktop computers plus a dozen machines running specialized graphics chips crunching intensive calculations for several months. The effort may have consumed about 2.8 gigawatt-hours of electricity, estimates Evan Sparks, CEO of Determined AI, a startup that provides software to help companies manage AI projects. A spokesperson for OpenAI questioned the calculation, noting that it makes several assumptions.


Exclusive look at Cruise's first driverless car without a steering wheel or pedals

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The not-a-car sits on the gleaming black stage surrounded by a halo of light. It's orange and black and white, and roughly the same size as a crossover SUV, but somehow looks much larger from the outside. There is no obvious front to the vehicle, no hood, no driver or passenger side windows, no side-view mirrors. The symmetry of the exterior is oddly comforting. I am one of the first non-employees to see it, after being invited by self-driving company Cruise to come out to San Francisco for an early look.


AI Can Do Great Things--if It Doesn't Burn the Planet

#artificialintelligence

Last month, researchers at OpenAI in San Francisco revealed an algorithm capable of learning, through trial and error, how to manipulate the pieces of a Rubik's Cube using a robotic hand. It was a remarkable research feat, but it required more than 1,000 desktop computers plus a dozen machines running specialized graphics chips crunching intensive calculations for several months. The effort may have consumed about 2.8 gigawatt-hours of electricity, estimates Evan Sparks, CEO of Determined AI, a startup that provides software to help companies manage AI projects. A spokesperson for OpenAI questioned the calculation, noting that it makes several assumptions. But OpenAI declined to disclose further details of the project or offer an estimate of the electricity it consumed.


GM's autonomous car company, Cruise, unveils Origin self-driving shuttle

FOX News

Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com General Motors is looking to "move beyond the car" with a shuttle that can move by itself. The automaker's autonomous vehicle subsidiary, Cruise, unveiled a self-driving shuttle prototype on Tuesday in San Francisco, and it doesn't have a steering wheel, foot pedals or any driver controls -- just seating for six accessed through large sliding doors. The all-electric Origin was designed to provide maximum passenger space and will eventually be deployed in a ride-hailing service run by Cruise. The company originally hoped to launch the service by the end of 2019 but delayed it to further develop the self-driving technology and the infrastructure required to operate a large network of vehicles.


GM to debut autonomous car without a steering wheel, report says

FOX News

Money Map Press chief investment strategist Keith Fitz-Gerald says he's excited about GM's new self-driving car but says society won't be ready for it for at least a decade. Cruise, General Motors' autonomous car subsidiary, is set to unveil its first fully driverless car on Tuesday in San Francisco, according to Bloomberg. Cruise has been developing self-driving technology with the goal of launching a ride-hailing service similar to Uber or Lyft and has a press conference scheduled for 4 pm PST. Sources familiar with the details of the event told the news outlet that, unlike the Chevrolet Bolt electric cars Cruise has been testing on the streets of San Francisco with human monitors, the vehicle will not have a steering wheel or pedals. It's an idea the company first pitched two years ago with an image of a Bolt's interior without the controls as it began petitioning the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration to allow it to build and deploy such a vehicle on public roads.


NXT – Data Engineer ai-jobs.net

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Citadel is a global investment firm built around world-class talent, sound risk management, and innovative leading-edge technology. For a quarter of a century, Citadel's hedge funds have delivered meaningful and measurable results to top-tier investors around the world, including sovereign wealth funds, public institutions, corporate pensions, endowments and foundations. With an unparalleled ability to identify and execute on great ideas, Citadel's team of more than 675 investment professionals, operating from offices including Chicago, New York, San Francisco, London, Hong Kong and Shanghai, deploy capital across all major asset classes, in all major financial markets.


Did HAL Commit Murder?

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Last month at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art I saw "2001: A Space Odyssey" on the big screen for my 47th time. The fact that this masterpiece remains on nearly every relevant list of "top ten films" and is shown and discussed over a half-century after its 1968 release is a testament to the cultural achievement of its director Stanley Kubrick, writer Arthur C. Clarke, and their team of expert filmmakers. As with each viewing, I discovered or appreciated new details. But three iconic scenes -- HAL's silent murder of astronaut Frank Poole in the vacuum of outer space, HAL's silent medical murder of the three hibernating crewmen, and the poignant sorrowful "death" of HAL -- prompted deeper reflection, this time about the ethical conundrums of murder by a machine and of a machine. In the past few years experimental autonomous cars have led to the death of pedestrians and passengers alike. AI-powered bots, meanwhile, are infecting networks and influencing national elections. Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking, Sam Harris, and many other leading AI researchers have sounded the alarm: Unchecked, they say, AI may progress beyond our control and pose significant dangers to society. When astronauts Frank and Dave retreat to a pod to discuss HAL's apparent malfunctions and whether they should disconnect him, Dave imagines HAL's views and says: "Well I don't know what he'd think about it."