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Nintendo Switch Joy-Con and Pro Controllers are on sale ahead of Black Friday

Mashable

The Nintendo Switch is an undeniably fantastic gaming console. Not only is it extremely convenient for taking on the go, but it's also home to some of the best games of the past few years that you simply can't get elsewhere -- The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, Super Mario Odyssey, Animal Crossing: New Horizons, and Fire Emblem: Three Houses, just to name a few. But the one decidedly not-so-great aspect of the Switch is the included Joy-Con controllers. They're known to lose their motion control accuracy after a while, and they're pretty much the opposite of ergonomic (don't even get us started on playing multiplayer games with split Joy-Con controllers...yikes). SEE ALSO: Nintendo's Switch Lite is exactly what it needs to be Even if you insist on going Joy-Con, it's always good to have a backup controller for when your pals want in on the fun, or for when you want to switch pairs while the other charges.


Watch OSIRIS-REx take a bite out of asteroid Bennu's surface

Engadget

OSIRIS-REx became the first mission to gather samples from an asteroid in space after it successfully collected rocky "regolith" material from the surface of Bennu. Now, NASA has released several videos showing exactly how that six-second collection process looked, and the best way to describe it is "controlled chaos." NASA prepared for this moment for a long time, as OSIRIS-Rex first started orbiting Bennu in early 2019. It conducted surveys early on that revealed organic carbonaceous material spread widely over Bennu's surface, particularly at the Nightingale site chosen for the sampling process. That gave NASA confidence that it would collect a sample with organic material, which was a central goal of the mission. The sample collection process was a carefully orchestrated dance.


Citrix CEO Henshall: There's broad realization that future of work is hybrid

ZDNet

Most every organization has been thrust into the future of work. What will determine failure or success in this brave new world? Citrix's third quarter was better than expected as demand for its Workspace applications was strong amid remote work arrangements. CEO David Henshall said that Workspace demand should remain strong as work goes hybrid. The company reported third quarter revenue of $767 million, up 5% from a year ago.


Tesla officially starts rollout of Full Self-Driving beta

#artificialintelligence

Tesla CEO Elon Musk announced on Twitter last night that the electric car company's Full Self-Driving beta update is officially being rolled out. "Will be extremely slow and cautious, as it should," Musk added an uncharacteristically serious tone. The update is, according to Musk, a revolutionary rewrite of his car company's controversial self-driving features suite, called Full Self-Driving or FSD. Despite of its name, the $8,000 option hasn't allowed drivers to completely take their hands off the steering wheel -- at least yet. In August, Musk promised that the update will be a "quantum leap, because it's a fundamental architectural rewrite, not an incremental tweak."


Here's how AI can train workers for the jobs of the future

#artificialintelligence

Some AI start-ups are focused directly on reskilling and upskilling today's workers, using AI algorithms to create personalized training programmes that build on workers' existing skillsets to prepare them for future opportunities that leverage technology. For example, California-based EdCast combines a detailed assessment of workers' skills with data-driven analysis of future labour market needs, allowing users to identify potential future jobs and gain the skills and qualifications they need to secure them.


Can Language Models Drive Computer Vision Models Out Of Business

#artificialintelligence

In computer vision applications, attention is either applied along with CNNs or used to replace certain components of these convolutional networks while keeping their overall structure in place. But convolutional architectures still remain dominant. The paper titled, 'An image is worth 16X16 words' was discussed by the likes of Tesla AI head, Andrej Karpathy, among many others. Ever since the seminal paper "Attention Is All You Need," transformers have rekindled the interest in language models. While the transformer architecture has become the go-to solution for many natural language processing tasks, its applications to computer vision remain limited.


FAU Awarded U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant for AI

#artificialintelligence

Dimitris A. Pados, Ph.D., principal investigator, a professor in the Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, a fellow of FAU's Institute for Sensing and Embedded Network Systems Engineering (I-SENSE), the Charles E. Schmidt Eminent Scholar in Engineering and Computer Science, and director of the Center for Connected Autonomy and Artificial Intelligence. Ensuring data quality is critical for artificial intelligence (AI) machines to learn effectively and operate efficiently and safely. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University's College of Engineering and Computer Science have received a three-year, $653,393 grant from the United States Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) for a project titled, "Data Analytics and Data Conformity Evaluation with L1-norm Principal Components." For the project, researchers will develop new theory and methods to curate training data sets for AI learning and screen real-time operational data for AI field deployment. The project team is spearheaded by Dimitris A. Pados, Ph.D., principal investigator, a professor in the Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, a fellow of FAU's Institute for Sensing and Embedded Network Systems Engineering (I-SENSE), the Charles E. Schmidt Eminent Scholar in Engineering and Computer Science, and director of the Center for Connected Autonomy and Artificial Intelligence (ca-ai.fau.edu)


What to Expect When You're Expecting Robots: The Future of Human-Robot Collaboration

#artificialintelligence

A new book co-authored by MIT engineers Julie Shah and Laura Major SM '05 explores a future populated with robot helpers. Book co-authored by MIT Associate Professor Julie Shah and Laura Major SM '05 explores a future populated with robot helpers. As Covid-19 has made it necessary for people to keep their distance from each other, robots are stepping in to fill essential roles, such as sanitizing warehouses and hospitals, ferrying test samples to laboratories, and serving as telemedicine avatars. There are signs that people may be increasingly receptive to robotic help, preferring, at least hypothetically, to be picked up by a self-driving taxi or have their food delivered via robot, to reduce their risk of catching the virus. As more intelligent, independent machines make their way into the public sphere, engineers Julie Shah and Laura Major are urging designers to rethink not just how robots fit in with society, but also how society can change to accommodate these new, "working" robots.


Facial recognition planned to halt virus spread during Tokyo Games

#artificialintelligence

Japan plans to use facial recognition technology, originally intended for security purposes, to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus when it hosts the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics next year, government sources said Wednesday. The technology was initially intended to ensure security identification of personnel involved in the games and the media, and detect suspicious persons. But virus countermeasures have become an urgent concern for the government in its hope of staging a successful Olympics, which has already been delayed by a year due to the pandemic. According to the sources, one plan is to station security cameras equipped with the technology at stadiums and venues to record spectators' faces and body surface temperatures, and to see if they are wearing masks. The recorded data is expected to help prevent cluster infections in case an individual at a game is discovered to be infected later, by helping pinpoint possible virus carriers, tracing their routes and notifying those who were in close contact.


Amazon's new Echo speakers sound better, but do you need to upgrade?

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Amazon has new Echo speakers to sell you. And if you're wondering whether or not to ditch the old ones for these, the answer comes down to two key questions for Alexa, the personal assistant. Do I prefer the looks of a round speaker over a cylinder? Do I crave better sound? This year Amazon is all about being spherical, in the shape of its "The Spheres" corporate headquarters in Seattle.