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There Is Something Extremely Wrong With The Texas Shooting Massacre Narrative - The Washington County Auditor

#artificialintelligence

We aren't saying that the massacre didn't happen in Texas and in no way would ever be able to write words that would ease the pain of those parents and family members of the slain children in the Texas Massacre. What is wrong with the narrative is something you probably hadn't heard yet despite the relentless media coverage of the massacre. What would you think If you learned that the school district that the shooting occurred in had Artificial Intelligence Software, that is sold commercially, that is meant to monitor social media for threats of violence against schools and the students. That is exactly what was in place in Uvalde, Texas when the shooting occurred. Worse yet, the software company lists threats of school shootings as one of the features the artificial intelligence is designed to catch before a mass shooting has occurred. In theory, the software catches these threats and reports them to law enforcement so they can respond in time to prevent the tragedy or at least help save as many lives as possible.


The Download: Google's AI cuteness overload, and America's fight for gun control

MIT Technology Review

Another month, another flood of weird, wonderful and cute images generated by an artificial intelligence. In April, OpenAI showed off its new picture-making neural network, DALL-E 2, which could produce remarkable high-res images of almost anything it was asked to. Now, just a few weeks later, Google Brain has revealed its own image-making AI, called Imagen. And it performs even better than DALL-E 2: it scores higher on a standard measure for rating the quality of computer-generated images and the pictures it produced were preferred by a group of human judges. But like OpenAI did with DALL-E, Google is going all in on cuteness.


Families of Oxford High School shooting victims react after board again rejects independent investigation

FOX News

The parents of several Oxford High School students, including deceased Tate Myre, have filed a lawsuit against shooting suspect Ethan Crumbley, his parents and school staff. The parents of two victims of the Nov. 30, 2021, shooting at Oxford High School in Michigan are demanding more transparency from the Oxford Community School District after the board voted against moving forward with an independent investigation into the tragedy last fall. The Oxford Board of Education on Tuesday announced that the district has, for the second time, declined an offer from Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel to conduct a third-party investigation into the school shooting with the goal of determining how shooting suspect Ethan Crumbley, 15, managed to kill four students and injure seven others last fall. "To me, this is an admission of guilt," Buck Myre, father of deceased 16-year-old Tate Myre, said during a Thursday press conference. "They know that things didn't go right that day, and they don't want to stand up and fix it. They're going to hide behind governmental immunity and they're going to hide behind insurance and the lawyers. What's this teach the kids? "We just want accountability," he added later when asked why an independent investigation is important to parents. Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald revealed in December 2021 that school officials met with Crumbley and his parents to discuss violent drawings he created just hours before the deadly rampage. The 15-year-old suspect was able to convince them during the meeting that the concerning drawings were for a "video game." His parents "flatly refused" to take their son home. The shooting has also resulted in several lawsuits, including two that seek $100 million in damages each, against the school district and school employees on behalf of the family of two sisters who attend the school. Ethan Robert Crumbley, 15, charged with first-degree murder in a high school shooting, poses in a jail booking photograph taken at the Oakland County Jail in Pontiac, Michigan. Myre and Meghan Gregory, the mother of 15-year-old Keegan Gregory, who survived the shooting but witnessed and was traumatized by Crumbley's rampage, are suing the shooting suspect's parents, James and Jennifer Crumbley, as well as school staff for negligence. JENNIFER CRUMBLEY, ETHAN CRUMBLEY'S MOTHER, SENT OMINOUS TEXTS ON DAY OF SHOOTING: 'HE CAN'T BE LEFT ALONE' "They're the ones that know what happened that day.


'Really alarming': the rise of smart cameras used to catch maskless students US schools

#artificialintelligence

When students in suburban Atlanta returned to school for in-person classes amid the pandemic, they were required to mask up, like in many places across the US. Yet in this 95,000-student district, officials took mask compliance a step further than most. Through a network of security cameras, officials harnessed artificial intelligence to identify students whose masks drooped below their noses. "If they say a picture is worth a thousand words, if I send you a piece of video – it's probably worth a million," said Paul Hildreth, the district's emergency operations coordinator. "You really can't deny, 'Oh yeah, that's me, I took my mask off.'"


How Smart Tech Is Transforming Nonprofits

#artificialintelligence

Covid-19 created cascades of shortages, disruptions, and problems that rolled downhill and landed in the most vulnerable neighborhoods. In these neighborhoods, it's often nonprofit organizations that provide services to members of the community. While the pandemic accelerated the need for digital transformation throughout the economy, the nonprofit sector was not immune to the need for nearly overnight innovation. As experts on the use of technology for social good, we've observed the many ways that nonprofits have been adopting "smart tech" to further social change in the wake of the pandemic, which we chronicle in our upcoming book, The Smart Nonprofit. We use "smart tech" as an umbrella term for advanced digital technologies that make decisions for people.


Alleged Michigan school shooter convinced officials violent drawings were harmless pursuit

FOX News

Deputy Aaron Garcia, of the U.S. Marshals Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team, details arrests of parents of suspected Michigan school shooter. The accused Michigan high school shooter convinced school officials ahead of the deadly rampage that violent drawings he made were for a "video game," a letter released Saturday by the school shows. "On the morning of Nov. 30, a teacher observed concerning drawings and written statements that have been detailed in media reports, which the teacher reported to school counselors and the Dean of students. The student was immediately removed from the classroom and brought to the guidance counselor's office where he claimed the drawing was part of a video game he was designing and informed counselors that he planned to pursue video game design as a career," a letter sent to the Oxford High School community from Oxford Community Schools superintendent Tim Thorne on Saturday states. Ethan Crumbley, 15, allegedly shot and killed four students and injured seven others at Oxford High School.


Schools put the brakes on facial recognition scheme for kids buying lunch

ZDNet

Schools in the United Kingdom have paused the rollout of facial recognition scans in cafeterias following backlash from data watchdogs and privacy advocates. Last week, the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO), the UK's data and privacy regulator, intervened after nine schools in North Ayrshire, Scotland, began scanning student faces to take payment for school lunches. At the time, more schools were expected to follow suit. The scheme was defended as a cashless, quick, and contactless means of payment in light of COVID-19. However, the ICO and privacy outfits were quick to note that in a time where law enforcement is roundly criticized for using the same technology on the streets, introducing it in schools may be unnecessary.


Facial recognition in schools: the latest software driving school lunchtimes - Education Technology

#artificialintelligence

Over the past year schools across the UK have implemented contactless technology to deliver hot school lunches safely and efficiently. But now, as schools return to normal operations, there's a new type of software powering contactless transactions: facial recognition. Pre-order, cashless payments and contactless are just some of the buzzwords we've heard over the past year, especially regarding school payments and the safe delivery of nutritious school meals. Now more than ever, schools are looking to technology for contactless solutions that increase efficiencies. In 2021, CRB Cunninghams, cashless catering, online payment, and identity management solutions provider to education establishments, launched facial recognition software to UK secondary schools.


Facial recognition scheme in place in some British schools

#artificialintelligence

Updated Facial recognition technology is being employed in more UK schools to allow pupils to pay for their meals, according to reports today. In North Ayrshire Council, a Scottish authority encompassing the Isle of Arran, nine schools are set to begin processing meal payments for school lunches using facial scanning technology. The authority and the company implementing the technology, CRB Cunninghams, claim the system will help reduce queues and is less likely to spread COVID-19 than card payments and fingerprint scanners, according to the Financial Times. Speaking to the publication, David Swanston, the MD of supplier CRB Cunninghams, said the cameras verify the child's identity against "encrypted faceprint templates", and will be held on servers on-site at the 65 schools that have so far signed up. He added: "In a secondary school you have around about a 25-minute period to serve potentially 1,000 pupils. So we need fast throughput at the point of sale."


Privacy fears as schools use facial recognition to speed up lunch queue

The Guardian

Privacy campaigners have raised concerns about the use of facial recognition technology on pupils queueing for lunch in school canteens in the UK. Nine schools in North Ayrshire began taking payments for school lunches this week by scanning the faces of their pupils, according to a report in the Financial Times. More schools are expected to follow. The company supplying the technology claimed it was more Covid-secure than other systems, as it was cashless and contactless, and sped up the lunch queue, cutting the time spent on each transaction to five seconds. With break times shortening, schools are under pressure to get large numbers of students through lunch more quickly.