Information Technology


Chatbots: Automating customer service in ASEAN

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In Southeast Asia, e-commerce is big business, with Singapore, Malaysia, the Philippines, Indonesia and Thailand generating US$14.8 billion in online sales throughout 2016. According to a 2019 study from Facebook and Bain & Company, ASEAN's digital consumers' spending will triple by 2025. Within the e-commerce sector, online retailers are already embracing artificial intelligence (AI) applications such as chatbots, to deliver a more personal experience for shoppers online. According to a 2018 article by Rene Millman titled'Adoption of AI booming in Southeast Asia,' the adoption rate of AI in the region grew to 14 percent in 2018. The article, citing an IDC report'Asia Pacific Enterprise Cognitive/AI Survey,' revealed that 37 percent of companies would put AI adoption plans in place in the next five years.


American businesses pass tipping point towards universal automation adoption

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SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA: The technology market has passed the tipping point with more than half of organisations today having adopted intelligent automation, as Robotic Process Automation (RPA) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) shift from emerging technologies to mainstream business solutions, according to a new analyst report by Futurum Research, commissioned by Automation Anywhere, an automation technology firm. The'Report for the State of RPA and Smart Automation' interviewed more than 1,000 business executives in North America and found that while 75.3% believe automation will make them more competitive, significant disparities exist between industries – with public sector and, surprisingly, technology companies lagging significantly when it comes to adoption. While more than half of businesses in North America have already implemented some type of automation solution, such as RPA and AI, the research uncovered notable differences between industries. For instance, nearly 9 out of 10 manufacturing organisations have already adopted some form of intelligent automation, compared to less than 3 in 10 public sector organisations. Despite these identified barriers to overcome, 9 in 10 organisations that have not yet implemented RPA and AI-based automation solutions report having sufficient internal technical competencies to do so, showing that technical implementation is no longer a significant hurdle for most organisations.


Intel Throws Down AI Gauntlet With Neural Network Chips

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At this year's Intel AI Summit, the chipmaker demonstrated its first-generation Neural Network Processors (NNP): NNP-T for training and NNP-I for inference. Both product lines are now in production and are being delivered to initial customers, two of which, Facebook and Baidu, showed up at the event to laud the new chippery. The purpose-built NNP devices represent Intel's deepest thrust into the AI market thus far, challenging Nvidia, AMD, and an array of startups aimed at customers who are deploying specialized silicon for artificial intelligence. In the case of the NNP products, that customer base is anchored by hyperscale companies – Google, Facebook, Amazon, and so on – whose businesses are now all powered by artificial intelligence. Naveen Rao, corporate vice president and general manager of the Artificial Intelligence Products Group at Intel, who presented the opening address at the AI Summit, says that the company's AI solutions are expected to generate more than $3.5 billion in revenue in 2019.


Intel's AI brains will give future laptops a new speed boost

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Intel's Nervana NNP-I chips are designed to be crammed into data centers for AI tasks like translating text or analyzing photos. It may not be obvious, but you're almost certainly using AI every day. Artificial intelligence-boosting hardware in your phone enables voice recognition and spots your friends in photos. In the cloud, it delivers search results and weeds out spam email. Next up for dedicated AI hardware will be your laptop, Intel expects.


IoT News - Small Businesses, It's Time to Ride the IoT Wave - IoT Business News

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There is nothing new about the fierce competition going out there across the globe; the fear of staying behind compels each one of us to ride the growth in your business you have to adapt to market trends. But the question is what does it mean to adapt to market trends? Over a span of years, disruptive technologies such as the Internet of Things (IoT), artificial intelligence, AR/VR seems to have created a huge impact on our lives. Everything seems changed right from the way we view, use, analyze and most important of all interact with these smart devices especially in the profit-spinning realm. Days have come where we are able to witness how internet-connected virtual assistants, appliances, security systems and more can all communicate and coordinate with each other, allowing business owners to automate as well as streamline mundane, time-consuming activities.


Microsoft AI chief Harry Shum to depart in February after 23 years at the tech giant

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Microsoft AI chief Harry Shum is leaving after 23 years at the Redmond, Wash. Shum, the executive vice president in charge of Microsoft's AI and Research Group, will depart in Feb. 1, 2020, a Microsoft spokesperson confirmed Wednesday. Microsoft CTO Kevin Scott will take over Shum's responsibilities while maintaining his previous work. The change is effective immediately. Shum, who also led Microsoft Research, will continue advising Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella and co-founder Bill Gates, but it's unclear what else is on the horizon for Shum.


Chaz Firestone - Arts & Sciences Magazine

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Try zeroing in on an orange. While the human brain may correctly identify the images, a machine might mistake them for a missile or jaguar, says Chaz Firestone, assistant professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Those mistakes might seem comical at face value, but could prove deadly if a self-driving car doesn't recognize a person in its path, for example. Or when we begin relying more on automated radiology to screen for anomalies like tumors or tissue damage. "Most of the time, research in our field [of artificial intelligence] is about getting computers to think like people," says Firestone.


Visa: Using AI To Separate The Good, Bad From Transactions PYMNTS.com

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That's the payments volume running over Visa's global network, a network whose vast global expanse is a tempting playground for cyberthieves. Visa's cybersecurity team, as Chief Information Security Officer Sunil Seshadri told Karen Webster, also logs as many as 8 billion security events every day -- that's billion with a "b." Not all events are intrusions or even attempts, but also include routine security logs and regular everyday network activity. These logs provide deep insight into what is happening in Visa's infrastructure and network on a real-time basis. But finding the signal in this noisy data is a challenge.


5G: What IT leaders need to know

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The basics of 5G start simply: 5G stands for the telecom providers' fifth-generation technology. You already knew that, or perhaps don't need to know that – the semantics aren't what will impact your business. You also already know 5G's overarching promise: It will be faster than previous generations. It's the business impacts that may not yet be as clear-cut. Experts generally concur this is more a matter of when than if.


Scammers deepfake CEO's voice to talk underling into $243,000 transfer

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Any business in its right mind should be painfully aware of how much money they could bleed via skillful Business Email Compromise (BEC) scams, where fraudsters convincingly forge emails, invoices, contracts and letters to socially engineer the people who hold the purse strings. And any human in their right mind should be at least a little freaked out by how easy it now is to churn out convincing deepfake videos – including, say, of you, cast in an adult movie, or of your CEO saying things that… well, they would simply never say. Well, welcome to a hybrid version of those hoodwinks: deepfake audio, which was recently used in what's considered to be the first known case of an AI-generated voice of a CEO to bilk a UK-based energy firm out of €220,000 (USD $243,000). The Wall Street Journal reports that some time in March, the British CEO thought he had gotten a call from the CEO of his business's parent company, which is based in Germany. Whoever placed the call sounded legitimate.