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Why Do Solar Farms Kill Birds? Call in the AI Bird Watcher

WIRED

America's solar farms have a bird problem. Utility companies have been finding bird carcasses littering the ground at their facilities for years, a strange and unexpected consequence of the national solar boom. No one was quite sure why this was happening, but it was clearly a problem for a type of energy that was billed as being environmentally friendly. So in 2013, a group of utilities, academics, and environmental organizations came together to form the Avian Solar Working Group to develop strategies to mitigate avian deaths at solar facilities around the US. "There was very little research about the impacts of solar on birds," says Misti Sporer, the lead environmental scientist at Duke Energy, an electric utility in North Carolina, and the coordinator of the working group.


Is China Winning the AI Race?

#artificialintelligence

CAMBRIDGE – COVID-19 has become a severe stress test for countries around the world. From supply-chain management and health-care capacity to regulatory reform and economic stimulus, the pandemic has mercilessly punished governments that did not – or could not – adapt quickly. From Latin America's lost decade in the 1980s to the more recent Greek crisis, there are plenty of painful reminders of what happens when countries cannot service their debts. A global debt crisis today would likely push millions of people into unemployment and fuel instability and violence around the world. The virus has also pulled back the curtain on one of this century's most important contests: the rivalry between the United States and China for supremacy in artificial intelligence (AI).


'Reskill And Restart' - An Innovative Solution To Reskill People By Infosys - Express Computer

#artificialintelligence

Infosys (NYSE: INFY), a global leader in next-generation digital services and consulting, today announced a consortium in partnership with pymetrics – the leader in fair talent matching – that brings together training partners Merit America, Per Scholas, Revature, and Woz Enterprise. The consortium will leverage Infosys Wingspan and pymetrics' AI-based talent-matching platform to meet the reskilling and employment needs raised by the COVID-19 crisis in America. Reskill and Restart--powered by Infosys Wingspan--takes job seekers on a guided journey, beginning with aptitude and skills assessment, followed by curated job-specific skills training, and culminating in matching them with available positions. The consortium of partners has built new pathways for talent to transition from traditional jobs across various industries and workstreams to digital and operations jobs of the future. It also enables employers who are scaling up to review the available talent pool for the right match and hire them while they undergo rapid and job-specific reskilling on this integrated multi-stakeholder platform.


AI 50: America's Most Promising Artificial Intelligence Companies

#artificialintelligence

Our second annual list highlights promising, private, U.S.-based companies that are using artificial intelligence in meaningful business-oriented ways.


Ingraham tells voters to 'learn to spot lies' from Democrats, prevent 'Orwellian chasm' of Biden presidency

FOX News

With the rise of the hard left in America, we should keep George Orwell's warning in mind and learn to spot lies that are made to sound truthful. Laura Ingraham opened Thursday's show with a monologue meant to help viewers "decode" the language used by Democrats to assuage voters who might otherwise be skeptical or fearful of a Joe Biden presidency. The "Ingraham Angle" host began by quoting George Orwell's classic 1946 essay, "Politics and the English Language," in which he wrote that "political language ... is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind." "At the time, George Orwell was writing about the rise of communism and far-left thought," Ingraham said. "Today with the rise of the hard left in America, we should keep Orwell's warnings in mind and learn to spot lies that are made to sound truthful during this pivotal time," she said.


Advice for the new NSF director

Science

A new director, Dr. Sethuraman Panchanathan, takes the helm of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) during a pivotal time for the future of scientific research in the United States. This month marks the 75th anniversary of the seminal report “Science—The Endless Frontier” by Vannevar Bush, director of the Office of Scientific Research and Development, submitted in 1945. The treatise laid the groundwork for the NSF and many other investments that have kept the United States at the forefront of scientific advancement and economic innovation. Today, American science and the United States face similar challenges that center around national security, economic strength, and social justice. To renovate the NSF in ways that address current issues, Dr. Panchanathan should use his position to build on the time-tested partnership between science and the U.S. government. To this end, I offer the following advice for improving the NSF in the coming years. In his new role, the director should position himself as the nation's leading public advocate for science. Although American society relies on scientific research and investment more than ever before, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has exposed in the American populace a vast and dangerous ignorance about science. Because the NSF supports all science and engineering disciplines, the director is uniquely positioned to be America's spokesperson for the promise of science—and government investment in science—to solve vexing problems and grow the economy. The NSF director can also speak about the nature of scientific research and how both successes and failures create new knowledge and innovations worthy of taxpayer investments. To use this bully pulpit for effectively communicating with policy-makers and the public, the director should rely on the agency's communications resources. Current events have refocused attention on the fact that all fields of scientific research in the United States have been far too White and male for far too long. The director should address the need for greater diversity in the scientific workforce. Drawing on a diverse talent pool can provide a key strategic advantage for the United States because scientists from diverse backgrounds ask different questions and in serving as role models, increase public support for science. The new director should seize this moment in our social consciousness to make science more inclusive by building on existing programs (such as the NSF ADVANCE and INCLUDES initiatives). He should also follow the recommendations of the National Science Board Vision 2030 report, which encourages institutional change and the adoption of proven science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) pedagogy and practices that boost diversity and inclusion. Such remodeling should prioritize inclusiveness and innovation in the way the NSF reviews and awards grants. The NSF's merit-based review system is the world's gold standard, but even gold needs occasional polishing. Streamlining the current grant application process will benefit applicants from all backgrounds by reducing structural barriers to entry that often hinder minority scientists and minority-serving institutions. Innovations that result from NSF investments must serve the public good. Building on successful programs such as the NSF Innovation Corps, the new director should seek ways to help faculty and students move scientific discoveries into the marketplace efficiently for the public good. For example, providing researchers with relatively modest supplemental awards to support market analysis or other aspects of technology transfer could help science faculty advance NSF-funded research with potential applications in both the public and private sectors. And the director should guide the NSF to focus on emerging fields such as artificial intelligence, quantum mechanics, and cognitive neuroscience—all of which are crucial to America's national security and economic competitiveness. These suggestions are starting points. Dr. Panchanathan should take advice not only from longtime scientists and university leaders like myself, but also from NSF career staff and the many university faculty members who rotate through NSF. Fortunately for all scientists and citizens, Dr. Panchanathan has a world-class track record of leadership on diversity, reform, and advancing emerging fields of science. For instance, at Arizona State University, Dr. Panchanathan developed assistive devices for the visually impaired, and demonstrably sharpened the university's focus on innovation and entrepreneurship. At this crucial juncture for America's scientific enterprise, NSF's future is in extremely capable hands.


China Wants to Lead the World on AI. What Does That Mean for America?

#artificialintelligence

Years ago, the thought of using software to fight a deadly pathogen might have seemed far-fetched. The Coronavirus pandemic has caused monumental shifts in the use and deployment of artificial intelligence (AI) around the world. Of those now using AI to fight Coronavirus, none are more prominent than China. From software that diagnoses the symptoms of Coronavirus to algorithms that identify and compile data on individuals with high temperatures vis-à-vis infrared cameras, China is showcasing the potential applications of AI. But Beijing is also demonstrating its willingness to leverage the technology to solve many of its problems.


Blue Hexagon Next-Gen NDR innovator recognized in Forbes AI 50 list for 2020 – IAM Network

#artificialintelligence

Deep Learning based Network Detection and Response technology leader included in "America's Most Promising Artificial Intelligence Companies"Blue Hexagon, deep learning innovator of Cyber AI You Can Trust was recognized in the 2020 Forbes AI 50 list. As one of America's most promising artificial intelligence (AI) companies, Blue Hexagon is the only real time deep learning cybersecurity company to instantly stop zero-day malware and threats before infiltration, detect and block active adversaries and reduce SOC alert overload."Traditional We are able to achieve 99.8% threat detection accuracy and sub-second verdict speed with our deep learning technology to revolutionize security operations," said Nayeem Islam, CEO of Blue Hexagon. "Forbes included us for using artificial intelligence in meaningful business-oriented ways. We're proud to be included in their list, and believe AI will fundamentally change the way we protect against cyber threats."In


Trade groups offering $100,000 reward after noose found at Facebook data center

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

The FBI and Justice Department are assisting the Altoona Police Department's investigation after a noose was found last month at a work site on the Facebook Data Center property in Altoona, Iowa. Altoona police officials say they contacted the FBI on June 19, the day the noose was found. The date coincided with Juneteenth, the annual holiday celebrating the end of slavery. Interviews are still being conducted in the investigation, according to Altoona Police Department Public Information Officer Alyssa Wilson. While federal investigators were already involved with the incident, as of Thursday, all information in the case will be filtered through the FBI's Omaha office.


AI 50: America's Most Promising Artificial Intelligence Companies

#artificialintelligence

Our second annual list highlights promising, private, U.S.-based companies that are using artificial intelligence in meaningful business-oriented ways.