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Artificial Intelligence Could Be a Solution to America's Mental Health Crisis

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Five years from now, the U.S.' already overburdened mental health system may be short as many as 15,600 psychiatrists as the growth in demand for their services outpaces supply, according to a 2017 report from the National Council for Behavioral Health. But some proponents say that, by then, an unlikely tool--artificial intelligence--may be ready to help mental health practitioners mitigate the impact of the deficit. Medicine is already a fruitful area for artificial intelligence; it has shown promise in diagnosing disease, interpreting images and zeroing in on treatment plans. Though psychiatry is in many ways a uniquely human field, requiring emotional intelligence and perception that computers can't simulate, even here, experts say, AI could have an impact. The field, they argue, could benefit from artificial intelligence's ability to analyze data and pick up on patterns and warning signs so subtle humans might never notice them.


Artificial Intelligence Could Be a Solution to America's Mental Health Crisis

#artificialintelligence

Five years from now, the U.S.' already overburdened mental health system may be short as many as 15,600 psychiatrists as the growth in demand for their services outpaces supply, according to a 2017 report from the National Council for Behavioral Health. But some proponents say that, by then, an unlikely tool--artificial intelligence--may be ready to help mental health practitioners mitigate the impact of the deficit. Medicine is already a fruitful area for artificial intelligence; it has shown promise in diagnosing disease, interpreting images and zeroing in on treatment plans. Though psychiatry is in many ways a uniquely human field, requiring emotional intelligence and perception that computers can't simulate, even here, experts say, AI could have an impact. The field, they argue, could benefit from artificial intelligence's ability to analyze data and pick up on patterns and warning signs so subtle humans might never notice them.


Students push to speed up artificial intelligence adoption in Latin America

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Omar Costilla Reyes reels off all the ways that artificial intelligence might benefit his native Mexico. It could raise living standards, he says, lower health care costs, improve literacy and promote greater transparency and accountability in government. But Mexico, like many of its Latin American neighbors, has failed to invest as heavily in AI as other developing countries. That worries Costilla Reyes, a postdoc at MIT's Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. To give the region a nudge, Costilla Reyes and three other MIT graduate students -- Guillermo Bernal, Emilia Simison and Pedro Colon-Hernandez -- have spent the last six months putting together a three-day event that will bring together policymakers and AI researchers in Latin America with AI researchers in the United States.


Diversity Is Critical in Advertising : I95 Business

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How culturally relevant is your marketing – and particularly your advertising video content? Demographic change, socio-political division and social media are amplifying polarization, making it critically important for brands to understand and authentically connect with diverse consumers – or lose significant share. Many brands are still struggling to understand what resonates and what doesn't with key segments of the population, particularly when they are looking to reach people of color and younger generations. Brands that truly understand and stand (in an authentic way) with their audiences' cultural values and identity are winning at marketing. Those that don't understand or ignore them are being left behind – ignored by consumers at best or being brutally called out on social media at worst.


China Investing in 'Artificial Intelligence' Warfare to Threaten US Military Superiority

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NEW YORK--China is eroding America's military superiority and conventional deterrence through the integration of artificial intelligence (AI) systems in its military strategies, operations, and capabilities, an independent U.S. federal commission warned, adding that the United States needs to step up investment in the technology and apply it to national security missions. China's communist regime has established research and development institutes to advance its military applications of AI. Those institutes are equivalent to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)--a U.S. agency under the Department of Defense responsible for the development of emerging technologies for military use. Military applications of AI technologies are being developed by Chinese researchers in the areas of "swarming, decision support, and information operations," while the country's defense industry is pursuing the development of "increasingly autonomous weapons systems," an interim report released by The National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence said on Nov. 4. The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) declared it would be the world leader in AI by 2030, part of its broader strategy to challenge America's military and economic position in Asia, as Beijing also pursues a process of "intelligentization" as a new imperative of its military modernization.


Is China gaining an edge in artificial intelligence?

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"China is betting on AI and investing in AI and deploying AI on a scale no other country is doing," says Abishur Prakash, a futurist and author of books about the effect of artificial intelligence (AI) on geopolitics. As developments in AI accelerate, some in the US fear that the ability of China's powerful central government to marshal data and pour resources into the field will push it ahead. The country has announced billions in funding for start-ups, launched programmes to woo researchers from overseas and streamlined its data policies. It has announced news-reading robots and AI-powered strategy for foreign relations. Perhaps most alarming to the US are its efforts to incorporate it into its military.


Is China gaining an edge in artificial intelligence?

#artificialintelligence

"China is betting on AI and investing in AI and deploying AI on a scale no other country is doing," says Abishur Prakash, a futurist and author of books about the effect of artificial intelligence (AI) on geopolitics. As developments in AI accelerate, some in the US fear that the ability of China's powerful central government to marshal data and pour resources into the field will push it ahead. The country has announced billions in funding for start-ups, launched programmes to woo researchers from overseas and streamlined its data policies. It has announced news-reading robots and AI-powered strategy for foreign relations. Perhaps most alarming to the US are its efforts to incorporate it into its military.


Election security, Artificial Intelligence among future threats on Pentagon's radar br

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GRAVE NEW WORLD: The U.S. needs to tackle the challenges of adapting artificial intelligence systems for modern warfare, the same way the "titans of industry" transformed Detroit into an "arsenal of democracy" during World War II, Defense Secretary Mark Esper said at a conference hosted by the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence. "Mastering artificial intelligence will require similar vision, ambition and commitment," Esper said. "We need the full force of American intellect and ingenuity working in harmony across the public and private sectors." Artificial Intelligence, sometimes called "machine learning," refers to advanced computer algorithms that can use data to "learn" and therefore make choices without human input. Last week a Pentagon advisory board released proposed guidelines for the ethical deployment of AI-enabled weapons on the battlefield.


The Jobs Robots Can't Do (At Least Not Yet)

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In the age of artificial intelligence, predicting which jobs will fall to automation is as much about what machines can do as it is about what they can't. More than half of all jobs in America -- both blue and white-collar -- are resistant to automation, according to an acclaimed study published in 2013 by two Oxford University researchers. Co-author Carl Benedikt Frey, who directs Oxford's Technology and Employment program, broke down three areas where human intelligence still beats artificial intelligence: perception and manipulation, social intelligence; and creativity. Each type has what Frey calls a "bottleneck," which slows the pace at which certain workforces can be automated. The premise is simple: Technology won't replace human workers if it can't do the job.


I Asked An AI To Write An Article Like I Would And Here's What I Got

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I'm sure you've all read articles about how very soon robots will be coming to take our jobs: self-driving cars taking our driving jobs, self-assembling machines taking our manufacturing jobs, self-eating food taking our restaurant jobs, self-internet surfing AIs taking our office jobs, and so on. I've always thought that I, a noted idiot who babbles about car stuff all day, would be relatively safe from this robotic replacement campaign. There's a new article-writing AI that might prove me wrong, though. The AI system is known as Grover, like Muppets and Presidents, and was developed as a system to detect artificially-generated news stories, when the developers realized the best way to make a fake-news detector was to make a fake-news generator. From what I can tell, the AI does attempt to replicate the style of the website you'd like it to generate a story for, and it appears to even take into account the author.