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B-52s again fly over Mideast in US military warning to Iran

Boston Herald

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) -- A pair of B-52 bombers flew over the Mideast on Sunday, the latest such mission in the region aimed at warning Iran amid tensions between Washington and Tehran. The flight by the two heavy bombers came as a pro-Iran satellite channel based in Beirut broadcast Iranian military drone footage of an Israeli ship hit by a mysterious explosion only days earlier in the Mideast. While the channel sought to say Iran wasn't involved, Israel has blamed Tehran for what it described as an attack on the vessel. The U.S. military's Central Command said the two B-52s flew over the region accompanied by military aircraft from nations including Israel, Saudi Arabia and Qatar. It marked the fourth-such bomber deployment into the Mideast this year and the second under President Joe Biden.


Teaching Home Robots

#artificialintelligence

At TRI, our goal is to make breakthrough capabilities in Artificial Intelligence (AI). Despite recent advancements in AI, the large amount of data collection needed to deploy systems in unstructured environments continues to be a burden. Data collection in computer vision can be both quite costly and time-consuming, largely due to the process of annotating. Annotating data is typically done by a team of labelers, who are provided a long list of rules for how to handle different scenarios and what data to collect. For complex systems like a home robot or a self-driving car, these rules must be constantly refined, which creates an expensive feedback loop.


Rep's bill would allow STEM ed to branch out

Boston Herald

Sometimes, vocations and avocations need a champion, and students in Massachusetts looking to further their knowledge of science, technology and robotics have one in state Rep. Danillo Sena. A House member representing the 37th Middlesex District, Sena filed a bill on Feb. 4 titled "An Act establishing an elementary and secondary school robotics grant program," meant to create a grant program that provides public and charter schools the necessary funding to increase robotics and STEM participation during and after school. STEM stands for science, technology, engineering and mathematics, a branch of education designed to help students to become better problem-solvers. "Money should not be a barrier between students and access to fun and engaging STEM education programs that foster creativity and have lasting positive effects on student achievement like these robotics teams," the Acton Democrat stated in a release. The bill was created in collaboration with Olivia Oestreicher, a member of Team 4905 Andromeda One Robotics at Ayer Shirley Regional High School and a Rep. Sena intern.


SARDO Is a Smartphone-Sniffing Search and Rescue Drone

#artificialintelligence

For anyone who has ever misplaced their iPhone, Apple's "Find My" app is a game-changer that borders on pure magic. Sign into the app, tap a button to sound an alarm on your MIA device, and, within seconds, it'll emit a loud noise -- even if your phone is set on silent mode -- that allows you to go find the missing handset. Yeah, it's usually stuck behind your sofa cushions or left facedown on a shelf somewhere. You can think of SArdo, a new drone project created by researchers at Germany's NEC Laboratories Europe GmbH, as Apple's "Find My" app on steroids. The difference is that, while finding your iPhone is usually just a matter of convenience, the technology developed by NEC investigators could be a literal lifesaver.


Affordable legal advice for all – from a robot

#artificialintelligence

An academic and a lawyer have teamed up to develop a robot lawyer, which, if successful, will make legal advice affordable to people from all backgrounds, while revolutionising the legal sector. Robots could take on significant parts of a lawyer's work, reducing the costs and barriers to access to legal services for everyone, rather than just those who can afford the high costs. The project, at the University of Bradford, is initially working on a machine learning-based application to provide immigration-related legal advice, but if successful, it could be replicated across the legal sector. The idea has received government backing in the form of a £170,000 grant from Innovate UK Knowledge Transfer Partnerships. Legal firm AY&J Solicitors is providing a further £70,000 as well as the vital knowledge of lawyers.


Annin Robotics - open source 6 axis robots you can build yourself

#artificialintelligence

The Annin Robotics AR2 and AR3 are free open plan low cost robots anyone can make themselves. They can be made using aluminum components or you can 3D print the parts yourself. The AR2 robot was the initial release of this robot and is the open loop version, The AR3 is the next generation and is identical to the AR2 with the exceptions of being closed loop (encoders) and having updated covers & spaces as well as an updated wiring harness. The 3D print files, operating software and assembly manuals can all be found on our downloads page for free. The goal of the AR2 and AR3 was to create a low cost option so that anyone could build a 6 axis robot for fun, educational purposes or small production operations.


How to avoid being replaced by a robot at work

#artificialintelligence

Recently, I was at a party in San Francisco when a man approached me and introduced himself as the founder of a small artificial intelligence (AI) start-up. As soon as the founder figured out that I was a technology writer for The New York Times, he launched into a pitch for his company, which he said was trying to revolutionise the manufacturing sector using a new AI technique called "deep reinforcement learning". The founder explained that his company's AI could run millions of virtual simulations for any given factory, eventually arriving at the exact sequence of processes that would allow it to produce goods most efficiently. This AI, he said, would allow factories to replace entire teams of human production planners, along with most of the outdated software those people relied on. "We call it the Boomer Remover," he said.


Marshall: Robot revolution is here

#artificialintelligence

In 2017, I returned to Canada from Sweden, where I had spent a year working on automation in mining. Shortly after my return, the New York Times published a piece headlined The Robots Are Coming, and Sweden Is Fine, about Sweden's embrace of automation while limiting human costs. Although Swedes are apparently optimistic about their future alongside robots, other countries aren't as hopeful. One widely cited study estimates 47 per cent of jobs in the United States are at risk of being replaced by robots and artificial intelligence. Whether we like it or not, the robot era is upon us.


Collaborative Intelligence: Humans and AI Are Joining Forces

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is becoming good at many "human" jobs--diagnosing disease, translating languages, providing customer service--and it's improving fast. This is raising reasonable fears that AI will ultimately replace human workers throughout the economy. Never before have digital tools been so responsive to us, nor we to our tools. While AI will radically alter how work gets done and who does it, the technology's larger impact will be in complementing and augmenting human capabilities, not replacing them. Certainly, many companies have used AI to automate processes, but those that deploy it mainly to displace employees will see only short-term productivity gains. In our research involving 1,500 companies, we found that firms achieve the most significant performance improvements when humans and machines work together. Through such collaborative intelligence, humans and AI actively enhance each other's complementary strengths: the leadership, teamwork, creativity, and social skills of the former, and the speed, scalability, and quantitative capabilities of the latter. What comes naturally to people (making a joke, for example) can be tricky for machines, and what's straightforward for machines (analyzing gigabytes of data) remains virtually impossible for humans.


A.I. Here, There, Everywhere

#artificialintelligence

I wake up in the middle of the night. "Hey, Google, what's the temperature in Zone 2," I say into the darkness. A disembodied voice responds: "The temperature in Zone 2 is 52 degrees." "Set the heat to 68," I say, and then I ask the gods of artificial intelligence to turn on the light. Many of us already live with A.I., an array of unseen algorithms that control our Internet-connected devices, from smartphones to security cameras and cars that heat the seats before you've even stepped out of the house on a frigid morning.