Goto

Collaborating Authors

North America


Interview with Intelenz Co-Founder & Head of Product Development: Renzo Zagni

#artificialintelligence

Renzo Zagni is the Co-Founder and Head of Product Development at Intelenz, a Silicon Valley Founder Institute portfolio company. Intelenz leverages the power of AI and machine learning to automate workflows and day to day processes for large enterprise organizations. Process automation enables enterprises to design workflows that reduce manual work, minimize risk, and accelerate process execution times while increasing overall business productivity. In short, process automation allows business to do more, with less, while also eliminating the risk of employee burnout, human error and extended product delivery outcomes. Intelenz's platform includes a patented No-Code'Virtual Process Manager' software, which uses AI and machine learning models through an intuitive user interface.


Rep's bill would allow STEM ed to branch out

Boston Herald

Sometimes, vocations and avocations need a champion, and students in Massachusetts looking to further their knowledge of science, technology and robotics have one in state Rep. Danillo Sena. A House member representing the 37th Middlesex District, Sena filed a bill on Feb. 4 titled "An Act establishing an elementary and secondary school robotics grant program," meant to create a grant program that provides public and charter schools the necessary funding to increase robotics and STEM participation during and after school. STEM stands for science, technology, engineering and mathematics, a branch of education designed to help students to become better problem-solvers. "Money should not be a barrier between students and access to fun and engaging STEM education programs that foster creativity and have lasting positive effects on student achievement like these robotics teams," the Acton Democrat stated in a release. The bill was created in collaboration with Olivia Oestreicher, a member of Team 4905 Andromeda One Robotics at Ayer Shirley Regional High School and a Rep. Sena intern.


How to avoid being replaced by a robot at work

#artificialintelligence

Recently, I was at a party in San Francisco when a man approached me and introduced himself as the founder of a small artificial intelligence (AI) start-up. As soon as the founder figured out that I was a technology writer for The New York Times, he launched into a pitch for his company, which he said was trying to revolutionise the manufacturing sector using a new AI technique called "deep reinforcement learning". The founder explained that his company's AI could run millions of virtual simulations for any given factory, eventually arriving at the exact sequence of processes that would allow it to produce goods most efficiently. This AI, he said, would allow factories to replace entire teams of human production planners, along with most of the outdated software those people relied on. "We call it the Boomer Remover," he said.


Building AI for the Global South

#artificialintelligence

Harm wrought by AI tends to fall most heavily on marginalized communities. In the United States, algorithmic harm may lead to the false arrest of Black men, disproportionately reject female job candidates, or target people who identify as queer. In India, those impacts can further impact marginalized populations like Muslim minority groups or people oppressed by the caste system. And algorithmic fairness frameworks developed in the West may not transfer directly to people in India or other countries in the Global South, where algorithmic fairness requires understanding of local social structures and power dynamics and a legacy of colonialism. That's the argument behind "De-centering Algorithmic Power: Towards Algorithmic Fairness in India," a paper accepted for publication at the Fairness, Accountability, and Transparency (FAccT) conference, which begins this week. Other works that seek to move beyond a Western-centric focus include Shinto or Buddhism-based frameworks for AI design and an approach to AI governance based on the African philosophy of Ubuntu.


Canadian Agritech Startup Farmers Edge Inc. Files IPO to Raise CAD 100 Million

#artificialintelligence

Farmers Edge Inc, an AI startup to help growers increase crop yields, plans to go public on Canada's largest Toronto Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol "FDGE". The company seeks to raise CAD 100 million (approximately USD 79 million). Founded in 2005, Farmers Edge uses AI technology to collect and analyze local weather, soil moisture and satellite data to help farmers improve crop efficiency and yield. Besides the Canadian Prairie, the company currently hosts offices in the United States, Australia, Russia, Brazil and Ukraine. As of the end of 2020, more than 3,000 growers have used the Farmers Edge products, covering more than 23 million acres of land in six countries.


Latest 2021 Stanford AI Study Gives Deep Look into the State of the Global AI Marketplace

#artificialintelligence

Despite major disruptions from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, global investment in AI technologies grew by 40 percent in 2020 to $67.9 billion, up from $48.8 billion in 2019, as AI research and use continues to boom across broad segments of bioscience, healthcare, manufacturing and more. The figures, compiled as part of Stanford University's Artificlal Intelligence Index Report 2021 on the state of AI research, development, implementation and use around the world, help illustrate the continually changing scope of the still-maturing technology. The 222-page AI Index 2021 report, touted as the school's fourth annual study of AI impact and progress, was released March 3 by Stanford's Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence. The report provides a detailed portrait of the AI waterfront last year, including increasing AI investments and use in medicine and healthcare, China's growth in AI research, huge gains in AI capabilities across industries, concerns about diversity among AI researchers, ongoing debates about AI ethics and more. "The impact of AI this past year was both societal and economic, driven by the increasingly rapid progress of the technology itself," AI Index co-chair Jack Clark said in a statement.


AI reveals current drugs that may help combat Alzheimer's

#artificialintelligence

New York, March 7 (IANS) Researchers have developed a method based on Artificial Intelligence (AI) that rapidly identifies currently available medications that may treat Alzheimer's disease. The method could represent a rapid and inexpensive way to repurpose existing therapies into new treatments for this progressive, debilitating neurodegenerative condition. Importantly, it could also help reveal new, unexplored targets for therapy by pointing to mechanisms of drug action. "Repurposing FDA-approved drugs for Alzheimer's disease is an attractive idea that can help accelerate the arrival of effective treatment -- but unfortunately, even for previously approved drugs, clinical trials require substantial resources, making it impossible to evaluate every drug in patients with Alzheimer's disease," said researcher Artem Sokolov from Harvard Medical School. "We therefore built a framework for prioritising drugs, helping clinical studies to focus on the most promising ones," Sokolov added.


What Policies Should India Emulate From The US's AI Playbook?

#artificialintelligence

The National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence (NSCAI) recently published the Final Report for 2021 outlining an integrated national strategy to empower the US in the era of AI-accelerated competition and conflict. NSCAI worked with technologists, national security professionals, business executives and academic leaders to put out the report. According to the report, the US government is a long way from being "AI-ready." Based on the findings, the commission has proposed a set of policy recommendations. The US leads in almost all AI parameters than most countries, including India.


Marshall: Robot revolution is here

#artificialintelligence

In 2017, I returned to Canada from Sweden, where I had spent a year working on automation in mining. Shortly after my return, the New York Times published a piece headlined The Robots Are Coming, and Sweden Is Fine, about Sweden's embrace of automation while limiting human costs. Although Swedes are apparently optimistic about their future alongside robots, other countries aren't as hopeful. One widely cited study estimates 47 per cent of jobs in the United States are at risk of being replaced by robots and artificial intelligence. Whether we like it or not, the robot era is upon us.


FDA authorizes new test to detect past Covid-19 infections

#artificialintelligence

The Food and Drug Administration on Friday issued an emergency authorization for a new test to detect Covid-19 infections -- one that stands apart from the hundreds already authorized. Unlike tests that detect bits of SARS-CoV-2 or antibodies to it, the new test, called T-Detect COVID, looks for signals of past infections in the body's adaptive immune system -- in particular, the T cells that help the body remember what its viral enemies look like. Developed by Seattle-based Adaptive Biotechnologies, it is the first test of its kind. Adaptive's approach involves mapping antigens to their matching receptors on the surface of T cells. They and other researchers had already shown that the cast of T cells floating around in an individual's blood reflects the diseases they've encountered, in many cases years later.