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US lagging in critical artificial intelligence: panel

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The United States is dangerously behind in artificial intelligence critical to its future including national security, according to a commission that includes a former head of Google and the future chief of Amazon. A report released by the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence called for the country to invest $40 billion to win a strategic AI competition with China. "America is not prepared to defend or compete in the AI era," ex-Google chief Eric Schmidt and former US deputy secretary of defense Robert Work said in a letter included with the 756-page report. "This is the tough reality we must face," the chairs of the commission said in the report released late Monday. The commission formed by Congress in 2018 is made up of technologists, national security professionals, business executives, and academic leaders including Oracle chief executive Safra Katz, an Andrew Jassy, who will take over head of Amazon later this year.


Potential early diagnostic biomarkers of sepsis

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Objective: The goal of this article was to identify potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of sepsis in order to improve their survival. Methods: We analyzed differential gene expression between adult sepsis patients and controls in the GSE54514 dataset. Coexpression analysis was used to cluster coexpression modules, and enrichment analysis was performed on module genes. We also analyzed differential gene expression between neonatal sepsis patients and controls in the GSE25504 dataset, and we identified the subset of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to neonates and adults. All samples in the GSE54514 dataset were randomly divided into training and validation sets, and diagnostic signatures were constructed using least absolute shrink and selection operator (LASSO) regression.


Budget 2021: Reactions From The Tech Industry

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Marking a significant shift in India's digital journey, the Union Finance Minister, Nirmala Sitharaman, has presented the first-ever digital budget for the upcoming fiscal year starting April 2021. Her budget speech touched upon "proliferation of technologies, especially analytics, machine learning, robotics, bioinformatics, and artificial intelligence." The budget has come at a time when the country is still struggling with the massive economic slowdown precipitated by COVID pandemic. However, despite this downturn, businesses have seen a significant push towards digitisation, including acknowledging the importance of artificial intelligence across industries. As a matter of fact, India is considered one of the fastest-growing digital markets globally.


Are Psychologists The Next Target For AI & Machine Learning?

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According to a WHO prediction, by 2020, roughly 20% of India will suffer from some mental illness and 450 million people currently suffer from a mental illness, worldwide. These numbers are a wake-up call that psychology as an issue and psychologists as a profession must be taken seriously. Such helping professions are often considered as human channels. Unlike manual workers whose job responsibilities are being taken over by machines and AI bots, psychiatrists and counselors see no threat to their professions with the advancements of machine learning and artificial intelligence. According to an influential survey of the future of employment by Carl Benedikt Frey and Micheal Osborne who are Oxford economists, the probability that psychology could be automated in the future is only 0.43%.


Here's how opinions on the impact of artificial intelligence differ around the world

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As with AI, Asian publics surveyed stand out for their relatively positive views of the impact of job automation. Many Asian publics have made major strides in the development of robotics and AI. The South Korean and Singaporean manufacturing industries, for instance, have the highest and second highest robot density of anywhere in the world. Singapore is also pursuing its goal of becoming the world's first "smart nation," and the government has identified AI as one of many key development areas necessary to reach that goal. Japan has also long been a world leader in robotics manufacturing and development, and robots and AI are increasingly integrated into everyday life there to help with tasks ranging from household chores to elder care.


Smile for the camera: dark side of China's emotion-recognition tech

The Guardian

"Ordinary people here in China aren't happy about this technology but they have no choice. If the police say there have to be cameras in a community, people will just have to live with it. So says Chen Wei at Taigusys, a company specialising in emotion recognition technology, the latest evolution in the broader world of surveillance systems that play a part in nearly every aspect of Chinese society. Emotion-recognition technologies – in which facial expressions of anger, sadness, happiness and boredom, as well as other biometric data are tracked – are supposedly able to infer a person's feelings based on traits such as facial muscle movements, vocal tone, body movements and other biometric signals. It goes beyond facial-recognition technologies, which simply compare faces to determine a match. But similar to facial recognition, it involves the mass collection of sensitive personal data to track, monitor and profile people and uses machine learning to analyse expressions and other clues. The industry is booming in China, where since at least 2012, figures including President Xi Jinping have emphasised the creation of "positive energy" as part of an ideological campaign to encourage certain kinds of expression and limit others. Critics say the technology is based on a pseudo-science of stereotypes, and an increasing number of researchers, lawyers and rights activists believe it has serious implications for human rights, privacy and freedom of expression. With the global industry forecast to be worth nearly $36bn by 2023, growing at nearly 30% a year, rights groups say action needs to be taken now. The main office of Taigusys is tucked behind a few low-rise office buildings in Shenzhen. Visitors are greeted at the doorway by a series of cameras capturing their images on a big screen that displays body temperature, along with age estimates, and other statistics. Chen, a general manager at the company, says the system in the doorway is the company's bestseller at the moment because of high demand during the coronavirus pandemic. Chen hails emotion recognition as a way to predict dangerous behaviour by prisoners, detect potential criminals at police checkpoints, problem pupils in schools and elderly people experiencing dementia in care homes. Taigusys systems are installed in about 300 prisons, detention centres and remand facilities around China, connecting 60,000 cameras. "Violence and suicide are very common in detention centres," says Chen. "Even if police nowadays don't beat prisoners, they often try to wear them down by not allowing them to fall asleep.


MarqVision enables real-time counterfeit goods detection with technology.

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When you found an excellent luxury product at an affordable price from an eCommerce platform, what makes you hesitate? Most of the customers hesitate if the product is a fraud or counterfeit one. "The counterfeit market has been on the rise for quite some time and, according to a Forbes study, sales from counterfeit and pirated goods total around $1.7 trillion every year -- more than drugs and human trafficking." MarqVision, A South Korean startup based in Boston and Seoul, was accepted by Y Combinator as YC 21 this January. The company provides an AI-powered platform to protect brands from counterfeits and an AI-enhanced video verification system for online retailers.


China eyes next-generation chip technology to take on global rivals

The Japan Times

In just two decades, China sent people into space, built its own aircraft carrier and developed a stealth fighter jet. Now the world's youngest superpower is setting out to prove its capabilities once more -- this time in semiconductors. At stake is nothing less than the future of the world's No. 2 economy. Beijing's blueprint for chip supremacy is enshrined in a five-year economic vision, set to be unveiled during a summit of top leaders in the capital this week. It's a multi-layered strategy both pragmatic and ambitious in scope, embracing aspirations to replace pivotal U.S. suppliers -- and fend off Washington -- while molding homegrown champions in emergent technologies.


How will Singapore ensure responsible AI use?

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Since 2019, government-sponsored initiatives around AI have proliferated across Asia Pacific. Such initiatives include the setting up of cross-domain AI ethics councils, guidelines and frameworks for the responsible use of AI, and other initiatives such as financial and technology support. The majority of these initiatives builds on the country's respective data privacy and protection acts. This is a clear sign that governments see the need to expand existing regulations when it comes to leveraging AI as a key driver for digital economies. All initiatives to date are voluntary in nature, but there are indications already that existing data privacy and protection laws will be updated and expanded to include AI.


What is The Potential for Machine Learning in The Future

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Machine Learning works on the principles of computer algorithms that learn in a reflex manner through trials and experiences. It is an application of Artificial Intelligence that permits program applications to anticipate results with utmost precision. It makes a distinction to create computer programs and to assist computers to memorize without human intercession. The future of machine learning is exceptionally exciting. At present, almost every common domain is powered by machine learning applications.