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Daily Mail - Science & tech


Scientists develop retinal implants that could give artificial vision to the blind

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A retinal implant with more than 10,000 electrodes has been developed which could give blind people a form of vision. The implant connects wirelessly to a computer system which is in the frame of a custom-built pair of glasses that the person also wears. A camera attached to the frame beams signals to the implant via this computer and electrodes light up accordingly. Illuminated electrodes activate the eye's sight cells which sends an image to the brain. Vision comes in the form of black and white dots which, although vastly different to true sight, would allow people to distinguish shapes and, ultimately, objects. The technology is in the process of getting medical approval for humans and as yet has not been trialled in people.


SpaceX uses robotic dog to investigate wreckage of SN10 that exploded ten minutes after landing

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The SpaceX team is clearing a mangled Starship from the launch after the rocket exploded following its first high latitude test Wednesday evening. The crew returned to the site the day after Starship Serial Number 10 (SN10) exploded 10 minutes following its'soft landing' and they brought along some help – Zeus the robotic dog. The yellow, four-legged robot was spotted prancing around SpaceX's testing facility in Boca Chica, Texas Thursday as it inspected the aftermath of the fallen rocket. Images of the wreckage have also surfaced on Twitter, showing the crushed body of SN10 and smashed Raptor engines – each of which costs $150 million. SpaceX returned to the site the day after Starship Serial Number 10 (SN10) exploded 10 minutes following its'soft landing' and they brought along some help – Zeus the robotic dog SpaceX has yet to reveal what caused SN10 to burst into flames, but some speculate it was caused by landing legs that did not deploy.


One in five men prefer to date women at least FIVE YEARS younger

Daily Mail - Science & tech

From Hugh Heffner to Donald Trump, many male celebrities are known for their tendency to date younger women. Now, a new study has revealed that as many as one in five British men choose to date women at least five years younger. Researchers trawled through 120,000 dating profiles to understand whether men really do live up to the stereotype of preferring younger women. Their findings indicate that the stereotype is very much true, with men citing good looks and health as the main reasons they prefer ladies their junior. Many male celebrities are known for their tendency to date younger women.


Hybrid robot can 'hear' electrical signals using a dead locust's ear in a world's first experiment

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A robot has heard sounds through the ear of a dead locust in a world's first experiment that uses the Ear-on-a-Chip method to create a long-lasting sensory device. A team from Tel Aviv University announced their new'Ear-bot' that replaces an electronic microphone in a bio-hybrid robot with the insect's ear, allowing the machine to receive electrical signals from the environment and respond accordingly. The result is extraordinary, according to researchers, as when they clap once, the dead insect's ear hears the sound, the robot interprets the pulse and moves forward. Although the experiment seems bizarre, the team conducted the test to understand how biological systems, specifically sensory ones, can be more integrated into mechanical systems. To create the Ear-on-a-Chip, the team placed the insect's ear and nerve in an aquatic environment that allowed air and sound to flow through.


Pets: Cats are 'too socially inept' to stand with their owners, study warns

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Unlike their canine counterparts, cats may be'too socially inept' to stand with their owners against someone treating their human poorly, a study has warned. Researchers from Japan found that our feline friends will as gladly take food from someone who hinders their owner as one who helps them or acts neutrally. However, this might not be a simple case of treachery, the team said -- instead, it is possible that cats cannot read human social interactions the same way dogs can. Domestic cats evolved from solitary hunters, meaning that they likely lacked the kind of original social skills dogs were able to build on during domestication. Unlike their canine counterparts, cats may be'too socially inept' to stand with their owners against someone treating their human poorly, a study has warned (stock image) In the study, animal behaviour scientist Hitomi Chijiiwa of Kyoto University and colleagues had cat owners try -- unsuccessfully -- to open a transparent container to take out an object while their cats watched.


Cuttlefish pass the 'marshmallow test' in US experiments

Daily Mail - Science & tech

In an amazing show of self-control, cuttlefish can resist the impulse to eat a morsel of food if it means getting to eat two morsels later on, a new study shows. In experiments, the marine molluscs passed a variation of the'marshmallow test' – originally used in the 1970s to measure a child's ability to delay gratification. In the original Stanford experiment, pre-school kids were given one marshmallow and told they could eat it straight away, or, if they waited 20 minutes, have two marshmallows instead. For this new study, scientists performed a'fishy version' of the legendary experiment using shrimp instead of marshmallows. They found the creatures could wait over two minutes to get their preferred type of shrimp – and that the cuttlefish that could delay gratification the longest were the most intelligent, as determined by a another learning task.


'Deepfake' Tom Cruise takes over TikTok with some 11 million views but raises alarms with experts

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Tom Cruise has gone viral on the popular video-sharing app TikTok, but the clips featuring the'Mission Impossible' star are deepfakes that experts are calling the'most alarmingly lifelike examples' of the technology. An account appeared on the app last week, dubbed'deeptomcruise,' which shows a number of videos depicting Cruise doing a magic trick, playing golf and reminiscing about the time he met the former President of the Soviet Union. The series of clips have been seen more than 11 million times on TikTok as of Tuesday, with many millions more on other social media platforms. Although the clips are for entertainment, experts warn that such content'should worry us'. 'Seeing is no longer believing' rhetoric undermines real video.' An account appeared on the app last week, dubbed'deeptomcruise,' which shows a number of videos that have been viewed more than 11 million times.


Extinction of larger animals led to the human brain doubling in size around 30,000 years ago

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The extinction of large animals led to the human brain growing, a new study reveals. When humans first emerged in Africa 2.6 million years ago the average animal size was more than 1,000 pounds, making them easy prey. Throughout the Pleistocene era, creatures' sizes decreased by 90 percent, which forced our ancient ancestors to developing cunning and bold methods to capture their next meal. As they shifted to hunting small, swift prey animals, humans developed higher cognitive abilities and experienced a growth of brain volume from 650cc to 1,500cc. When humans first emerged in Africa 2.6 million years ago the average animal size was more than 1,000 pounds, making them easy prey Previous research shows that early humans survived by hunting large game, which provided them with the necessary fat and sources of energy to survive.


Single-celled slime mold has no brain or nervous system but remembers where it got its last meal

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The single-celled Physarum polcephalum, or slime mold, does not have a brain or nervous system, but is able to remember the location of a food source, a new study reveals. German scientist sound the bright yellow slime mold records where its last meal was by changing the shape of its tubular tendrils. If it encounters food while weaving around an environment, the mold will keep its specific structure in that area to know where to return to feast. The latest study builds on the'amazing' skills of the yellow mold, which can also solve mazes and perform other tasks that require intelligence. New research suggests P. polycephalum, a bright yellow slime mold with no brain or nervous system, 'remembers' records where a food source is by restructuring the shape of its tubular tendrils.


CIA developed underwater robotic spy, 'Charlie the Catfish' in the 1990s

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The US military is equipped with a number of stealthy underwater robots to spy on enemies, but these high-tech innovations come years after Charlie the robotic catfish. Developed in the 1990s by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), this unmanned underwater vehicle is operated remotely using a line-of-sight audio and fitted with sensors to spy on adversaries, along with collecting water samples. The'catfish' is also designed with a pressure hull, ballast system and communication system in the main part of its body and propulsion system in the tail. Details of Charlie's missions are still classified, but the technology led engineers to design robotic submarines and other aquatic inspired machines to investigate the seas. The robotic fish measures about two feet long and some of its specifications, according to the CIA website, include speed, endurance, depth control and navigational accuracy.