Government


Drone, AI And Big Data: Govt's Plan To Digitally Map India By Investing INR 1000 Cr In 5 Years

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Prof Ashutosh Sharma, secretary to the government (Ministry of Science and Technology) reportedly said that the government has initiated a project to digitally map the country with a resolution of 10 centimetres, using drones and technologies such as artificial intelligence and big data. The Survey of India, a part of the Department of Science and Technology, started on the project a few months ago and has chalked out a five-year plan to complete the project. The survey has started the exercise in Maharashtra, Karnataka and Haryana. "The project will be extended to other states but the respective government should show interest and also provide some financial support," Sharma said. The project, which is expected to cost INR 1000 Cr, is also mapping the entire Ganga basin from the beginning to the end, 25 km from either sides of the banks with an accuracy of 10 cm.


Ethics guidelines for trustworthy AI - Digital Single Market - European Commission

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The Guidelines put forward a set of 7 key requirements that AI systems should meet in order to be deemed trustworthy. The AI HLEG has also prepared a document which elaborates on a Definition of Artificial Intelligence used for the purpose of the Guidelines. The document also provides an assessment list that operationalises the key requirements and offers guidance to implement them in practice. Starting from the 26th of June, this assessment list undergoing a piloting process, to which all stakeholders are invited to test the assessment list and provide practical feedback on how it can be improved.


How IOT and AI can help identify flailing trees and prevent accidents

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New Delhi: In June 2019, a strong dust storm killed 17 people and injured 11 in Uttar Pradesh. According to the state government's findings, the accidents were caused by overturning of trees or collapsing buildings on the victims. During storms and heavy rain, bigger and older trees often lose branches or even fall down completely due to weak roots. People often grow trees in their garden or backyard of the house for the greenery, fruits or aesthetic value. However, proper management including the risk assessment of big trees are not taken seriously by many.


How IOT and AI can help identify flailing trees and prevent accidents

#artificialintelligence

New Delhi: In June 2019, a strong dust storm killed 17 people and injured 11 in Uttar Pradesh. According to the state government's findings, the accidents were caused by overturning of trees or collapsing buildings on the victims. During storms and heavy rain, bigger and older trees often lose branches or even fall down completely due to weak roots. People often grow trees in their garden or backyard of the house for the greenery, fruits or aesthetic value. However, proper management including the risk assessment of big trees are not taken seriously by many.


Fury as viral 'ImageNet' app gives racist labels and calls people a 'rape suspect'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A viral app which classifies selfies using its in-built artificial intelligence has been spewing out vile and racist labels and enraging users. Many took to social media to condemn the racist and offensive software but makers of the app, at Princeton University, say causing offence was exactly the intention. It was intended to be deliberately provocative to draw attention to the in-built prejudice and discrimination in many forms of machine learning. However, many users, it seems, didn't fully get the idea of the art project and were outraged at what their images were labelled as. One MailOnline staffer who tried the app was grotesquely dubbed a'rape suspect' from an innocuous picture.


How climate scientists harness artificial intelligence to handle big data

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A book from 1984 bears testimony to Dr Carsten Brockmann's long interest in artificial intelligence (AI). Today he is applying this knowledge at an ever-increasing pace to his other interest, climate change. "What was theoretical back then is now becoming best practice," says Brockmann, who believes AI has the power to address pressing challenges facing climate researchers. Orbiting our planet with sensors pointing Earthwards are over 700 Earth observation satellites, transmitting hundreds of terabytes each day to downlink stations. Processing and extracting useful information is a huge data challenge, with volumes rising quasi-exponentially.


Killer robots: why do so many people think they are a good idea? Stuart Heritage

The Guardian

Laura Nolan is a modern hero. A former Google software engineer, Nolan resigned from her job last year after being asked to dramatically enhance the artificial intelligence used in US military drones. She is now calling for a ban on all forms of autonomous weapons on the basis that they might accidentally initiate a catastrophic global war. She said this as part of her role as a member of the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots. Now, listen, sometimes I'm able to kid myself about the goodness of people.


AI Mimics CEOs Voice To Steal £201000 – GMA

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A recent Wall Street Journal report has highlighted how, in March this year, a group of hackers were able to use AI software to mimic an energy company CEO's voice in order to steal £201,000. Reports indicate that the CEO of an unnamed UK-based energy company received a phone call from someone that he believed to be the German chief executive of the parent company. The person on the end of the phone ordered the CEO of the UK-based energy company to immediately transfer €220,000 (£201,000) into the bank account of a Hungarian supplier. The voice was reported to have been so accurate in its sound, that the CEO of the energy company even recognised what he thought was the subtleties of the German accent of his boss, and even "melody" of the accent. The call was so convincing that the energy company made the transfer of funds as requested.


AI can't protect us from deepfakes, argues new report

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A new report from Data and Society raises doubts about automated solutions to deceptively altered videos, including machine learning-altered videos called deepfakes. Authors Britt Paris and Joan Donovan argue that deepfakes, while new, are part of a long history of media manipulation -- one that requires both a social and a technical fix. Relying on AI could actually make things worse by concentrating more data and power in the hands of private corporations. "The panic around deepfakes justifies quick technical solutions that don't address structural inequality," says Paris. "It's a massive project, but we need to find solutions that are social as well as political so people without power aren't left out of the equation."


Judge Andrew Napolitano: Police surveillance cameras and facial recognition technology threaten our privacy

FOX News

Judge Napolitano's Chambers: Judge Andrew Napolitano breaks down why the Fourth Amendment is an intentional obstacle to government, an obstacle shown necessary by history to curtail tyrants. A trial in Great Britain has just concluded with potentially dangerous implications for personal freedom in the U.S. Great Britain is currently one of the most watched countries in the Western world – watched, that is, by its own police forces. In London alone, one study found that more than 420,000 surveillance cameras were present in public places in 2017. What do the cameras capture? Everything done and seen in public.