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AI in Transportation: Top 3 Real-World Cases

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Artificial Intelligence is already impacting Manufacturing, Retail, Marketing, Healthcare, Food industries and more. Today we will take an in-depth look at another industry, that with proper AI expertise from development companies could be disrupted. Transportation is an industry that helps humanity with moving people their belongings from one location to the other. While doing that, this industry had experienced countless twists, turns, breakthroughs, and setbacks to get to the place where it is now. The year 1787 was the defining one for this industry because steamboat was introduced and changed everything.


Autonomous In Action: Self-Driving Cars Get All The Publicity, But Other Industries Are Already Getting Exceptional Value From Ai-based Systems

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Truly "autonomous" systems are starting to replace or augment many of the routine tasks and processes people perform every day, improving efficiency while freeing individuals for higher-level pursuits. But what's often overlooked is how much progress is happening in other areas and industries: healthcare, air travel, energy provision, retail, logistics, agriculture, and construction. Autonomous systems are even helping governments match refugees with the most suitable communities to live, as detailed in one of the four real-world vignettes we present below. Such optimism makes sense, given advances such as self-managing and self-patching databases in IT. But our survey's other findings might underestimate the pace of change: Just 24% say they expect to see significant use of autonomous tech in construction, for example, even though self-driving bulldozers already are in use on select projects.


Top 50 innovative spirits launches of 2019: 10-1

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English spirits producer Circumstance Distillery created the first gin using artificial intelligence (AI) last year, called Monker's Garkel. The Bristol‐based producer partnered with technology scientists Tiny Giant and Rewrite Digital to build the AI, called Ginette, a neural network and the'brains' behind the expression. Ginette was programmed by the team to analyse thousands of botanicals, understand gin recipes and learn a database of more than 500 gin names. The AI then selected a "fragranced" gin – and that was how Monker's Garkel came to be. Bottled at 40% ABV, Monker's Garkel is made with juniper berries, coriander seed, angelica root, raspberry leaf, gooseberry, prune, clementine zest, orange zest and marigold.


Weekly Top 10 Automation Articles - Latest, Trending Automation News

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The German government is facing a bill of around $887,000 (800,000 euros) for failing to upgrade to Windows 10 ahead of the Windows 7 end of support date last week. German newspaper Handelsblatt reports that the German Federal Ministry is looking to secure at least 33,000 machines still running Windows 7, which involves paying Microsoft a fee per device for a year of extended security protection. Lego is releasing an official International Space Station kit, which includes a scale model of the orbital platform, along with a miniature dockable Space Shuttle, a deployable satellite and two astronaut mini figurines. The kit is made up of 864 pieces, and celebrates the science station's more than 20 years in operation. It was originally suggested through Lego's Ideas platform, which crowdsources ideas from the Lego fan community.


Scientists have built the world's first living, self-healing robots

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Scientists have created the world's first living, self-healing robots using stem cells from frogs. Named xenobots after the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) from which they take their stem cells, the machines are less than a millimeter (0.04 inches) wide -- small enough to travel inside human bodies. They can walk and swim, survive for weeks without food, and work together in groups. These are "entirely new life-forms," said the University of Vermont, which conducted the research with Tufts University's Allen Discovery Center. Stem cells are unspecialized cells that have the ability to develop into different cell types.


These "xenobots" are living machines designed by an evolutionary algorithm

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Meet the xenobots: Tiny living robots have been created using cells taken from frog embryos. Each so-called xenobot is less than a millimeter across, but one can propel itself through water using two stumpy limbs, while another has a kind of pouch that it could use to carry a small load. The early research, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could help the development of useful soft robots that can heal themselves when damaged. Because they are made of living tissue, they also decay once they stop working. The researchers, from Tufts University, the University of Vermont, and the Wyss Institute at Harvard, hope such living robots could one day be used to clean up microplastics, digest toxic materials, or even deliver drugs inside our bodies (although this is obviously still all a long way off).


Four lessons from PwC's digital transformation, workforce upskilling efforts ZDNet

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PwC has been undergoing a large digital transformation effort that includes upskilling its workforce to become more technology and analytics savvy. The benefits of those efforts are starting to bubble up. At a demo day in New York City, PwC outlined a bevy of uses for robotic process automation, artificial intelligence and analytics and how those tools could be incorporated in audits and other services the firm provides. "The goal is to free up a lot of time for auditors to do the human things that they need to do and democratize innovation," said Sherri Guidone, US Assurance Technology Leader at PwC. "Our people can solve unique problems and we've seen change in just a few years in understanding technology." PwC is spending $3 billion to invest in tools, training and technologies to advance its business.


Is NeurIPS Getting Too Big?

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NeurIPS 2019, the latest incarnation of the Neural Information Processing Systems conference, wrapped up just over a week ago. Multiple great blog posts have already summarized various talks and key trends, so the goal of this piece is more humble: to reflect on the experience of attending the conference, and in particular whether its vast size is harmful to its purpose as a research conference. Thirteen thousand attendees, 1,428 accepted papers, and 57 workshops vast. This is 9 minutes condensed down to 15 seconds, and this is not even close to all the attendees! Is that a Rolling Stones concert?


Controversial facial recognition firm Clearview AI facing legal claims after damning NYT report

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Clearview AI, an artificial intelligence firm providing facial recognition technology to US law enforcement, may be overstating how effective its services are in catching terrorist suspects and preventing attacks, according to a report from BuzzFeed News. The company, which gained widespread recognition from a New York Times story published earlier this month, claims it was instrumental in identifying a New York suspect from video footage who had placed three rice cookers disguised as explosive devices around New York City last August, creating panic and setting off a citywide manhunt. BuzzFeed News found via a public records request that Clearview AI has been claiming in promotional material that law enforcement linked the suspect to an online profile in only five seconds using its database. But city police now say this is simply false. "The NYPD did not use Clearview technology to identify the suspect in the August 16th rice cooker incident," an NYPD spokesperson told BuzzFeed News.


Artificial Intelligence Needs Private Markets for Regulation--Here's Why

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A regulatory market approach would enable the dynamism needed for AI to flourish in a way consistent with safety and public trust. It seems the White House wants to ramp up America's artificial intelligence (AI) dominance. Earlier this month, the U.S. Office of Management and Budget released its "Guidance for Regulation of Artificial Intelligence Applications," for federal agencies to oversee AI's development in a way that protects innovation without making the public wary. The noble aims of these principles respond to the need for a coherent American vision for AI development--complete with transparency, public participation and interagency coordination. But the government is missing something key.