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Argo AI and Ford to Launch Self-Driving Vehicles on Lyft Network by End of 2021 - Argo AI

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DEARBORN, Mich., JULY 21, 2021 – In an industry-first collaboration, Argo AI, Lyft and Ford Motor Company are working together to commercialize autonomous ride hailing at scale. The unique collaboration brings together all of the parts necessary to create a viable autonomous ride hailing service, including the self-driving technology, vehicle fleet and transportation network needed to support a scalable business and deliver an exceptional experience for riders. "This collaboration marks the first time all the pieces of the autonomous vehicle puzzle have come together this way," Lyft co-founder and CEO Logan Green said. "Each company brings the scale, knowledge and capability in their area of expertise that is necessary to make autonomous ride-hailing a business reality." As vehicles are deployed, Lyft users within the defined service areas will be able to select a Ford self-driving vehicle to hail a ride.


Ford, Argo AI launching self-driving Lyft service in Miami this year

FOX News

The 2022 Ford Maverick pickup has been revealed with a standard hybrid powertrain and a starting price of $19,995. Fox News Autos Editor Gary Gastelu visited Ford's Michigan Proving Ground to get an up close look. Ford Motor Co. and a self-driving vehicle company it partly owns will join with the Lyft ride-hailing service to offer autonomous rides on the Lyft network. The service using Ford vehicles and a driving system developed by Pittsburgh-based Argo AI will begin in Miami later this year and start in Austin, Texas, in 2022. It will start with human backup drivers and go fully autonomous at an unspecified date.


The Computer Scientist Training AI to Think With Analogies

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The Pulitzer Prize-winning book Gödel, Escher, Bach inspired legions of computer scientists in 1979, but few were as inspired as Melanie Mitchell. After reading the 777-page tome, Mitchell, a high school math teacher in New York, decided she "needed to be" in artificial intelligence. She soon tracked down the book's author, AI researcher Douglas Hofstadter, and talked him into giving her an internship. She had only taken a handful of computer science courses at the time, but he seemed impressed with her chutzpah and unconcerned about her academic credentials. Mitchell prepared a "last-minute" graduate school application and joined Hofstadter's new lab at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.


The Best 5 Courses in this Specialization

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This Specialization 160,486 recent views The 5 courses in this University of Michigan specialization introduce learners to data science through the python programming language. This skills-based specialization is intended for learners who have a basic python or programming background, and want to apply statistical, machine learning, information visualization, text analysis, and social network analysis techniques through popular python toolkits such as pandas, matplotlib, scikit-learn, nltk, and networkx to gain insight into their data. Introduction to Data Science in Python (course 1), Applied Plotting, Charting & Data Representation in Python (course 2), and Applied Machine Learning in Python (course 3) should be taken in order and prior to any other course in the specialization. After completing those, courses 4 and 5 can be taken in any order. All 5 are required to earn a certificate.


Decoding Crop Genetics with Artificial Intelligence - Seed World

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We live in a time when it's never been easier or less expensive to sequence a plant's complete genome. But knowing all a plant's genes is not the same thing as knowing what all those genes do. Michigan State experts in plant biology and computer science plan to close that gap with the help of artificial intelligence and a new $1.4 million grant from the National Science Foundation. Ultimately, the goal is to help farmers grow crops with genes that give their plants the best chance to withstand threats such as drought and disease. To get to that point, though, researchers still need to reveal the fundamental role of many of the genes found in plants.


Backlash to retail use of facial recognition grows after Michigan teen unfairly kicked out of skating rink

ZDNet

Multiple civil rights groups banded together this week to end the use of facial recognition tools by large retailers. According to advocacy group Fight For the Future, companies like Apple, Macy's, Albertsons, Lowes and Ace Hardware use facial recognition software in their stores to identify shoplifters. The group created a scorecard of retailers that they update based on whether the company is currently using facial recognition, will in the future or never will. Stores like Walmart, Kroger, Home Depot, Target, Costco, CVS, Dollar Tree and Verizon have all committed to never using facial recognition in their stores in statements to Fight For the Future. Walgreens, McDonald's, 7-Eleven, Best Buy, Publix, Aldi, Dollar General, Kohl's, Starbucks, Shoprite and Ross are just a few of the companies that Fight For the Future believes may use facial recognition software in the future.


Toyota strengthens autonomous vehicle play with Carmera acquisition

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Carmera and Toyota collaborated on a mapping project in Detroit in 2019. Less than three months after acquiring Lyft's autonomous vehicle unit for $550 million, Toyota subsidiary Woven Planet Holdings made another acquisition to strengthen its position in the market. Woven Planet is acquiring HD mapping startup Carmera for an undisclosed amount. Carmera and Toyota are already quite familiar with each other. The companies collaborated on multiple projects from 2018-2020 in Detroit, Michigan, and Japan.


Machine Learning Model Predicts COVID-19 Severity, Helps in Decision-Making, Says Study

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New York, July 14: A centralised repository of COVID-19 health records built by US researchers, last year, has been helpful in tracing the progression of the disease over time and could eventually be used as the basis for decision-making tools. The National COVID-19 Cohort Collaborative (N3C) is a centralised, harmonised, high-granularity electronic health record repository that is the largest, most representative COVID-19 cohort to date. 'Treatment With Blood Thinners May Reduce Death in COVID-19 Patients', Says Study This multicenter data set can support robust evidence-based development of predictive and diagnostic tools and inform clinical care and policy, said a team of researchers from those including at Universities of Colorado, Michigan, Rochester Medical Center, and Johns Hopkins. The cohort study, published in the JAMA Network, used data from 34 medical centers and included over 1 million adults -- 174,568 who tested positive for COVID-19 and 1,133,848 who tested negative between January 2020 and December 2020. "This cohort study found that COVID-19 mortality decreased over time during 2020 and that patient demographic characteristics and comorbidities were associated with higher clinical severity," said Tellen D. Bennett, from Department of Pediatrics at Colorado's School of Medicine.


Decoding crop genetics with artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

IMAGE: Be "decoding " plant genetics, the MSU researchers hope to help farmers grow crops with genes that give their plants the best chance to withstand threats like drought and disease. We live in a time when it's never been easier or less expensive to sequence a plant's complete genome. But knowing all a plant's genes is not the same thing as knowing what all those genes do. Michigan State experts in plant biology and computer science plan to close that gap with the help of artificial intelligence and a new $1.4 million grant from the National Science Foundation. Ultimately, the goal is to help farmers grow crops with genes that give their plants the best chance to withstand threats such as drought and disease.


The future of self-driving? Maybe less like Elon Musk and more like Domino's pizza robots

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As companies like Tesla and its CEO Elon Musk come to Austin, Texas, the booming city and new tech hub has grown so much it has struggled to make good on its "keep it weird" motto. But since early June, when residents of the South Congress, Downtown, or Travis Heights neighborhoods order pizza from Southside Flying Pizza, their pies might arrive inside a three-wheeled robot -- the REV-1. But it is no full self-driving Tesla. About two dozen REV-1 vehicles now trundle down the roads of Austin and Ann Arbor, Michigan, where the company behind the robots -- Refraction AI -- first launched in 2019 in a bid to harness driverless technology in a new way. Autonomous vehicles, and their potential to disrupt the way people get around, have hovered on the horizon for years. But the technology hasn't matured as dramatically as early investors had hoped.