Goto

Collaborating Authors

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories


World's first 3D printed steel bridge weighing 4.9 tons opens to public in Amsterdam

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

You may have heard of 3D movies and paintings, but would you dare walk on a 3D steel printed bridge? Amsterdam has just installed the world's first, built to withstand heavy pedestrian traffic. The bridge, which is now open to pedestrians and cyclists, was created by the Imperial College London and took over four years to build, according to a press release. The bridge was publicly revealed by Her Majesty Queen Máxima of the Netherlands. The almost 40-foot structure weights 4.9 tons and will be carefully monitored using installed sensors.


'Dead Space' is alive: Electronic Arts to release remake of horror classic

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Electronic Arts' horror classic "Dead Space" is being resurrected. The video game publisher announced Thursday plans to remake the popular survival horror video game for PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X S and PC. No release date was revealed. The game is being developed by the EA studio Motive, which previous worked on "Star Wars Squadrons." The original "Dead Space" from 2008 starred an engineer named Isaac Clarke sent on a mission to repair a stranded space ship.


Video game 'FIFA 22' gets more realism thanks to 22-player motion capture matches

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

To bring more realism to "FIFA 22," EA Sports went to extremes on the pitch – and brought inclusivity to its announcing team. The video game publisher had 22 players put on Xsens motion capture suits and then play competitive matches in Spain. All that data – more than 8.7 million frames of advanced match capture, EA Sports says – will be used to create real-time soccer gameplay animations as players mash controller buttons. And the game maker also is bringing its first female announcer to the game: Alex Scott, who played for the English national team and Arsenal of the Women's Super League. "This is a big moment for FIFA, for football and women and girls across the world," she said on Twitter and Instagram.


California sues Activision Blizzard over equal pay violations, sexual harassment

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

The state of California is suing Activision Blizzard, alleging the video game publisher violated equal pay laws and "fostered a sexist culture" within the workplace. In a statement released by the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing, the lawsuit filed in Los Angeles Superior Court claims Activision Blizzard paid women less than men despite doing more work, and fired or forced women to quit at higher frequencies than men. The agency also says women of color were "particularly impacted" by the company's practices. The suit also alleges women working at Activision Blizzard were subject to constant sexual harassment including groping, comments and advances. 'All of a sudden ... a villain':How online harassment turned to public health officials "All employers should ensure that their employees are being paid equally and take all steps to prevent discrimination, harassment, and retaliation," said Kevin Kish, director of the Department of Fair Employment and Housing, in a statement.


Tokyo Olympics: Google is rolling out these updates to get into the Summer Games spirit

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Ready to participate in your own Summer Games? Google will roll out a new interactive game Friday available through its Search logo, one of several updates planned to keep visitors up to date on the Tokyo Olympics. The company's interactive Doodle game will have players competing in several competitions including skateboarding, rugby and climbing. The games, made in partnership with Studio 4 C, will feature a "16-bit" visual style resembling classic home video game console titles. Interactive games available through Google's logo is nothing new.


Netflix will press start on video game 'expansion' with games for smartphones, tablets

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Mobile video games will be the focus of the Netflix's video game initiative. These future mobile games will be included in members' subscriptions at no additional cost, the Los Gatos, California-based streaming TV provider company said in its second quarter 2021 shareholder letter Tuesday. "We view gaming as another new content category for us, similar to our expansion into original films, animation and unscripted TV," the company said. "We're excited as ever about our movies and TV series offering and we expect a long runway of increasing investment and growth across all of our existing content categories, but since we are nearly a decade into our push into original programming, we think the time is right to learn more about how our members value games. Netflix:The 50 best TV shows to watch right now: 'Never Have I Ever' Season 2 in July Streaming TV:Can you have too much of a good thing? Netflix last week hired video game executive Mike Verdu as its vice president of game development. He had previously been at Facebook-owned VR company Oculus, where he oversaw games. Prior to that, he had worked at Electronic Arts and Zynga. The company is in "the early stages of further expanding into games, building on our earlier efforts around interactivity," Netflix said, noting its Black Mirror Bandersnatch "choose your own adventure" film and "Stranger Things" video games. This news about video games comes as Netflix sees its growth slowing. Worldwide, Netflix added 1.5 million new subscribers in the April-June period, beating their own 1.2M forecast. But the net TV provider lost 430,000 subscribers in the U.S. and Canada during the period. In the same period a year ago, Netflix added 10 million new global subscribers with about 2.9 million new additions from the U.S. and Canada. And the company's forecast of 3.5 million new subscribers expected for the current quarter (July-Sept.) is below what analysts hoped (5 million or more). "The pandemic has created unusual choppiness in our growth and distorts year-over-year comparisons as acquisition and engagement per member household spiked in the early months of COVID," the company said. Netflix shares were down 1% in after-hours trading. As for growing competition in the streaming market, Netflix pointed to the Warner Media-Discovery merger and Amazon's acquisition of studio MGM of "the ongoing industry consolidation as firms adapt to a world where streaming supplants linear TV." Such consolidation not affected Netflix's growth "much, if at all," the company said. "While we are continually evaluating opportunities, we don't view any assets as "must-have" and we haven't yet found any large scale ones to be sufficiently compelling to act upon.


Fitness company Peloton is making its own video game, called Lanebreak

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Add Peloton to the list of companies experimenting with a move into video games. The fitness giant revealed its first endeavor called Lanebreak. In a statement published to Peloton's website, David Packles, the company's senior director of product management, said the game requires players to match or sustain their cadence or resistance during a workout to get the highest possible score. Riders can control their cadence with their leg speed, said Packles, and switch lanes by turning the resistance knob on their bikes. Players will also face multiple obstacles all synchronized to the beat of the music.


Valve unveils Steam Deck, a portable gaming PC that looks like a Nintendo Switch

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

The company behind the Steam video game marketplace plans to launch a portable gaming PC that looks similar in design to the Nintendo Switch. Valve announced Thursday the Steam Deck, a portable all-in-one PC they say compares to a gaming laptop and can run the latest video games. Along with the ability to play any games available on Steam, users can also install or add any additional software or hardware. The device is slated to launch this December starting at $399. "We think Steam Deck gives people another way to play the games they love on a high-performance device at a great price," said Valve founder Gabe Newell in a statement.


Theme parks may never be the same after the pandemic, and that's just what fans want

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Whether it's using QR codes to pull up menus at restaurants or ordering groceries for pickup or delivery online, people have gotten used to navigating the world at their own pace and in their own space during the pandemic. Now they're expecting the same types of experiences at theme parks, according to a newly released survey by Oracle and Merlin Entertainments, which operates various theme parks and attractions across the globe, including Legoland parks and Madame Tussauds. "COVID impacted how people interact," said Simon de Montfort Walker, General Manager of Oracle Food and Beverage. Oracle's point of sale software is used at concession and retail operations across Merlin theme parks and other major businesses like Marriott and Outback Steakhouse. Disney World holidays:Mickey's Very Merry Christmas Party being replaced with new Very Merriest event "We've all spent a lot less time waiting in lines," he said.


Two-thirds of Americans, 227 million, play video games. For many games were an escape, stress relief in pandemic

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Yes, we did play more video games during the coronavirus pandemic. Hey, when you are asked to stay at home and social distance as a way to stop or at least slow the spread of COVID-19, who could blame you for bingeing on "Animal Crossing," "Call of Duty" or "Fortnite." More than half of players (55%) said they played more games during the pandemic, and most players (90%) said they will continue playing after the country opens up, according to a survey of 4,000 U.S. adults conducted by market research firm Ipsos in February 2021 for the Entertainment Software Association. For players during the pandemic, video games were a source of stress relief (55%) and distraction (48%), the survey found. Video games also served as an escape and a break for children, 71% of parents surveyed said.