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Deepfake video: It takes AI to beat AI

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By now, most of us have shared a few chuckles over AI-generated deepfake videos, like those in which the face of comedian and impressionist Bill Hader gradually takes on the likenesses of Tom Cruise, Seth Rogen, and Arnold Schwarzenegger as he imitates the celebrities. We've seen actor Ryan Reynolds' mug superimposed over Gene Wilder's in the 1971 classic film "Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory." We've even marveled over businessman Elon Musk being turned into a baby. It all can be quite humorous, but not everyone is laughing. Tech companies, researchers, and politicians alike are growing concerned that the increasing sophistication of the artificial intelligence and machine learning technology powering deepfakes will outpace our ability to discern between genuine and doctored imagery.


The 5G report card: Building today's smart IoT ecosystem

Robohub

Almost every presentation began apologetically with the refrain, "In a 5G world" practically challenging the industry's rollout goals. At one point Brigitte Daniel-Corbin, IoT Strategist with Wilco Electronic Systems, sensed the need to reassure the audience by exclaiming, 'its not a matter of if, but when 5G will happen!' Frontier Tech pundits too often prematurely predict hyperbolic adoption cycles, falling into the trap of most soothsaying visions. The IoTC Summit's ability to pull back the curtain left its audience empowered with a sober roadmap forward that will ultimately drive greater innovation and profit. The industry frustration is understandable as China announced earlier this month that 5G is now commercially available in 50 cities, including: Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen.


US military says Russian air defenses shot down unarmed drone near Libyan capital: report

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 7 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com The U.S. military believes the unarmed drone that went missing over the Libyan capital last month was actually shot down by Russian air defenses. The U.S. Africa Command is demanding the return of the aircraft's wreckage, which had been part of an operation conducted in Libya to assess the area's security and monitor for violent extremist activity. The command didn't give a reason for the drone loss after the Nov. 21 incident, but they had been investigating, Reuters reported.


10 Ways AI And Machine Learning Are Improving Endpoint Security 7wData

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Gartner predicts $137.4B will be spent on Information Security and Risk Management in 2019, increasing to $175.5B in 2023, reaching a CAGR of 9.1%. Cloud Security, Data Security, and Infrastructure Protection are the fastest-growing areas of security spending through 2023. Spending on AI-based cybersecurity systems and services reached $7.1B in 2018 and is predicted to reach $30.9B in 2025, attaining a CAGR of 23.4% in the forecast period according to Zion Market Research. Traditional approaches to securing endpoints based on the hardware characteristics of a given device aren't stopping breach attempts today. Bad actors are using AI and Machine Learning to launch sophisticated attacks to shorten the time it takes to compromise an endpoint and successfully breach systems.


This weird roleplaying AI makes a great dungeon master

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When AI development firm OpenAI released its GPT-2 algorithm, it warned that the tech was capable of flooding the internet with fake news and propaganda. What it didn't predict, however, is that the algorithm can also make a pretty effective dungeon master. AI Dungeon 2 (playable here) uses the full-sized GPT-2 algorithm to bring players through a text adventure-style game that it writes in real-time based on the player's prompts and commands. The game isn't perfect -- in my playing, it for some reason decided to name every single character "Dan" -- but it's fascinating all the same to let a powerful AI system take the wheel and steer the game's journey. AI Dungeon 2 is a far cry from the first version of the game, which creator and Northwestern University grad student Nathan Whitmore built around a substantially weaker version of GPT-2.


Advanced AI and counter threat intelligence will evolve shifting the traditional advantage of cybercriminals - Express Computer

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Fortinet has unveiled predictions from the FortiGuard Labs team about the threat landscape for 2020 and beyond. These predictions reveal methods that Fortinet anticipates cybercriminals will employ in the near future, along with important strategies that will help organizations protect against these oncoming attacks. Changing the Trajectory of Cyberattacks Cyberattack methodologies have become more sophisticated in recent years magnifying their effectiveness and speed. This trend looks likely to continue unless more organizations make a shift as to how they think about their security strategies. With the volume, velocity, and sophistication of today's global threat landscape, organizations must be able to respond in real time at machine speed to effectively counter aggressive attacks.


How AI is helping spot wildfires faster

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Beyond that, the alerts can help first responders arrive more quickly, too. While a motorist or airplane pilot may call in a smoke report for a general area, Descartes' text-based tool narrows down where the fire is. "That's very beneficial," Griego said, "especially at night when it's hard to determine what mountain range this fire's actually on when you're on top of a peak 20 miles away." The need for all manner of fire-fighting solutions is growing as climate change worsens wildfires across California and the Southwestern US. Wildfires blazed through California's wine country and the Los Angeles area in October, less than a year after a devastating fire leveled the California town of Paradise.


Why Robotics is Changing the World

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Robotics is the field of engineering that is focused on developing machines – usually by combining knowledge from both the field of mechanics and electronics – that are able to either fully or partly take over tasks that would normally be carried out by humans. As technology advanced, components such as processors, electric motors and different kind of sensors have become increasingly more compact and precise, stimulating the use of robotics in other fields than only that of manufacturing. Robotics, fueled by artificial Intelligence (AI) is rapidly changing the way we work and interact with technology. Technological advances have drastically changed the capabilities of modern robotics, allowing them to be operational and effective in a wide range of industries. New technologies – such as artificial intelligence, machine learning, and advanced computer vision – form the basis of the further development of robotics, allowing them to be used in processes which were, up until today, deemed to only be executable by humans.


A notorious Iranian hacking crew is targeting industrial control systems

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Iranian hackers have carried out some of the most disruptive acts of digital sabotage of the last decade, wiping entire computer networks in waves of cyberattacks across the Middle East and occasionally even the US. But now one of Iran's most active hacker groups appears to have shifted focus. Rather than just standard IT networks, they're targeting the physical control systems used in electric utilities, manufacturing, and oil refineries. At the CyberwarCon conference in Arlington, Virginia, on Thursday, Microsoft security researcher Ned Moran plans to present new findings from the company's threat intelligence group that show a shift in the activity of the Iranian hacker group APT33, also known by the names Holmium, Refined Kitten, or Elfin. Microsoft has watched the group carry out so-called password-spraying attacks over the past year that try just a few common passwords across user accounts at tens of thousands of organizations.


How AI is helping spot wildfires faster

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San Francisco (CNN Business)As wildfire season raged in California this fall, a startup a few states away used artificial intelligence to pinpoint the location of blazes there within minutes -- in some cases far faster than these fires might otherwise be noticed by firefighters or civilians. Santa Fe-based Descartes Labs, which uses AI to analyze satellite imagery, launched its US wildfire detector in July. The company's AI software pores over images coming in roughly every few minutes from two different US government weather satellites, in search of any changes -- the presence of smoke, a shift in thermal infrared data showing hot spots -- that could indicate a fire has ignited. Descartes is testing its detector by sending alerts to select forestry officials in its home state of New Mexico and told CNN Business its wildfire detector has spotted about 6,200 total thus far. The company says it can often detect these fires when they're just about 10 acres in size.