One week of unhealthy eating could 'damage a part of the brain which normally stops us eating MORE'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Eating a diet of junk food for just one week was enough to damage part of the brain that stops us eating more when we are already full, research suggests. Study participants who ate an abundance of fast food and high-fat milkshakes had increased cravings for more after seven days. They performed worse on cognitive tests, with results suggesting an area of the brain called the hippocampus was impaired. The hippocampus normally stops us from gorging on more food when we are full by suppressing memories of how tasty it is. When it's not working properly, the memories are more powerful and we are left unable to resist more cake, chocolates and crisps in front of us, the researchers believe.


Leiden University's computer algorithm spots ELEVEN asteroids that could hit Earth

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A computer algorithm from Leiden University in the Netherlands has spotted eleven asteroids that could eventually hit Earth and cause'unprecedented devastation'. All were missed by NASA software thanks to their chaotic orbits, which are difficult for current techniques to predict and identify as being potentially dangerous. Each are more than 328 feet (100 metres) in diameter and will pass closer to our planet than ten times the distance between the Earth and the moon. For comparison, the Tunguska object which flattened 772 square miles of forest in Siberia had a diameter of around 164–262 feet (50–80 metres). However, these space rocks won't pose a threat in our lifetime, however -- for they will only get worryingly near to Earth between the years 2131 and 2923.


Match.com rolls out safety feature that relays details of your next date to three emergency contacts

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Online dating going mainstream hasn't made the potential dangers of meeting up with an internet stranger any less alarming. That's why Match.com is rolling out a check-in feature that lets users shoot over their date details to trusted confidantes, including the name of the person they're meeting up with, the location of the date and the time. Once check-in is turned on, users will receive an automated text message during their date asking them if everything is going alright and if they'd like to notify their previously listed emergency contacts if it's not. Match.com is letting users notify emergency contacts if their date is showing any red flags. Check-in sends users a text that users can reply to and send trusted contacts their date's name, the location of the date and the time The user can then reply'yes' to the text message and all three contacts will be notified.


Tesla cars tricked into accelerating up to 85 MPH in a 35 MPH zone using just a strip of tape

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A Tesla vehicle has been tricked into spontaneously accelerating over the speed limit with just a simply strip of tape. Researchers at McAfee placed a two-inch long piece of electrical tape horizontally across the middle of the '3' on a 35 mph speed limit sign, causing the car's camera system to misread it as 85 mph. When the 2016 Tesla Model X drove toward the altered sign in cruise control it automatically accelerated to 50 mph before being stopped by the driver – the same occurred in a 2016 Model S. The findings come just a month after Tesla found itself under investigation after 127 complaints were sent to the National Highway Safety Administration (NHTSA) claiming certain models experienced'sudden unintended acceleration'. Researchers at McAfee placed a two-inch long piece of electrical tape horizontally across the middle of the '3' on a 35 mph (left) speed limit sign, causing the car's camera system to misread it as 85 mph (right) The flaw is said to have caused 110 crashes and 52 injuries, with many drivers stating the incident occurred when they attempted to park in a garage or at a curb. However, Tesla has noted that'the car accelerates if, and only if, the driver told it to do so, and it slows or stops when the driver applies the brake'.


Devices found in Houthi missiles and Yemen drones link Iran to attacks

The Japan Times

DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – A small instrument inside the drones that targeted the heart of Saudi Arabia's oil industry and those in the arsenal of Yemen's Houthi rebels match components recovered in downed Iranian drones in Afghanistan and Iraq, two reports say. These gyroscopes have only been found inside drones manufactured by Iran, Conflict Armament Research said in a report released on Wednesday. That follows a recently released report from the United Nations saying its experts saw a similar gyroscope from an Iranian drone obtained by the U.S. military in Afghanistan, as well as in weapons shipments seized in the Arabian Sea bound for Yemen. The discovery further ties Iran to an attack that briefly halved Saudi Arabia's oil output and saw energy prices spike by a level unseen since the 1991 Gulf War. It also ties Iran to the arming of the rebel Houthis in Yemen's long civil war.


Is Text Analysis key to Renaissance's Success? - Alternative Data Sources

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Jim Simons is the greatest moneymaker in modern financial history, and no other investor – Warren Buffett, Peter Lynch, Ray Dalio, Steve Cohen, or George Soros – can touch his record. His firm has earned profits of more than $100 billion, and between 1994 and 2004, its signature fund, The Medallion Fund, averaged 70 per cent annual return. Medallion's returns don't seem to correlate with known factors and the only thing most people get to know is that the strategy is "statistical arbitrage". People are confounded by the fact that the proliferation of other quantitative hedge funds in recent years hasn't caused Medallion's performance to deteriorate. Last year, there was a very readable book about Jim Simons: On the man who solved the markets – How Jim Simons Launched the Quant Revolution, Penguin 2019.


Automation Anywhere revamps its process discovery technology - SiliconANGLE

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Robotic process automation company Automation Anywhere Inc. is beefing up its platform today with a new Discovery Bot tool that can identify and automate more business processes for enterprises. Automation Anywhere is a heavily funded startup that has emerged as one of the early leaders in the red-hot RPA market. RPA is gaining traction because enterprises can reap massive benefits by speeding up mundane business processes, freeing up workers to focus on more pressing tasks. The company is chasing what analysts believe is a massive opportunity in RPA, with SiliconANGLE's sister research firm Wikibon forecasting that the total market capitalization for RPA software could be worth as much as $75 billion by 2025. But although there's a huge pot of gold up for grabs, it might not be big enough for everyone: Wikibon warns that RPA is still likely to be a winner-take-all market with room for a couple of players at best.


How Trip Inferences and Machine Learning Optimize Delivery Times on Uber Eats - Machine Learning Times - machine learning & data science news

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In Uber's ride-hailing business, a driver picks up a user from a curbside or other location, and then drops them off at their destination, completing a trip. Uber Eats, our food delivery service, faces a more complex trip model. When a user requests a food order in the app, the specified restaurant begins preparing the order. When that order is ready, we dispatch a delivery-partner to pick it up and bring it to the eater. Modeling the real world logistics that go into an Uber Eats trip is a complex problem.


Google Brain and DeepMind researchers attack reinforcement learning efficiency

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Reinforcement learning, which spurs AI to complete goals using rewards or punishments, is a form of training that's led to gains in robotics, speech synthesis, and more. Unfortunately, it's data-intensive, which motivated research teams -- one from Google Brain (one of Google's AI research divisions) and the other from Alphabet's DeepMind -- to prototype more efficient means of executing it. In a pair of preprint papers, the researchers propose Adaptive Behavior Policy Sharing (ABPS), an algorithm that allows the sharing of experience adaptively selected from a pool of AI agents, and a framework -- Universal Value Function Approximators (UVFA) -- that simultaneously learns directed exploration policies with the same AI, with different trade-offs between exploration and exploitation. The teams claim ABPS achieves superior performance in several Atari games, reducing variance on top agents by 25%. As for UVFA, it doubles the performance of base agents in "hard exploration" in many of the same games while maintaining a high score across the remaining games; it's the first algorithm to achieve a high score in Pitfall without human demonstrations or hand-crafted features.


Elevating the Human Enterprise with a Machine-First Mindset - InformationWeek

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At Bank of America, Erica reminds thousands of customers when their bills are due. She also helps people balance budgets and search for past transactions. Customers love Erica, even though she's not a person -- she's a bot. But she also represents how businesses can forge successful digital transformations using a machine-first approach. The purpose of adopting a machine-first approach is to bring together diverse technologies, including automation, AI and analytics in a holistic way.